Log24

Saturday, August 17, 2013

The Story of N…

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 8:28 PM

Continues.

IMAGE- Marissa Mayer on numbers in Vogue magazine

— Marissa Mayer in the current Vogue  online

Tuesday, August 13, 2013

The Story of N

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:00 PM

(Continued from this morning)

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110107-The1950Aleph-Sm.jpg

The above stylized "N," based on
an 8-cycle in the 9-element Galois field
GF(9), may also be read as
an Aleph.

Graphic designers may prefer a simpler,
bolder version:

Plan 9

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 11:00 AM

(Continued from August 28 last year)

Backstory— 

Reflections from today's date, August 13, in 2003, that included
the following remark by Aldous Huxley on an artist's work:

"All the turmoil, all the emotions of the scenes
have been digested by the mind into a
grave intellectual whole. It is as though
Bach had written the 1812 Overture."

Related art—

Josefine Lyche, from her 2013 Crackquarelle  series:

IMAGE- From the 2013 Josefine Lyche 'Crackquarelle' series

Steven H. Cullinane, The Story of N ,
from The Misalignment of Mars and Venus series:

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11B/110720-Misaligned.jpg

See, too, previous posts on The Story of N.

Tuesday, July 26, 2011

Venus at St. Anne’s

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 7:20 PM

The title is that of a chapter in the C.S. Lewis classic  That Hideous Strength .

A search suggested by this afternoon's NY Lottery four-digit number,
8002, yields a forum post at WebOfNarcissism.com—

"a book that changed my life"—

"Here is the book:

http://www.amazon.com/What-Loved-Novel-Siri-Hustvedt/dp/0312421192

Warning.  It is dark.  But it is also lovely."

Whether it is deep as well, the reader may judge.

The quoted review is from a discussion by an anonymous user
of her relationship with someone called N. See also, in this journal,
The Story of N.

Happy St. Anne's Day.

Wednesday, July 20, 2011

Cover Art

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 8:00 AM

The Misalignment of Mars and Venus

A death in Sarasota on Sunday leads to a weblog post from Tuesday
that suggests a review of Dan Brown's graphic philosophy—

From The Da Vinci Code :

Langdon pulled a pen from his pocket.  “Sophie are you familiar with the modern icons for male and female?”  He drew the common male symbol ♂ and female symbol ♀.

“Of course,” she said.

“These,” he said quietly, are not the original symbols for male and female.  Many people incorrectly assume the male symbol is derived from a shield and spear, while the female represents a mirror reflecting beauty.  In fact, the symbols originated as ancient astronomical symbols for the planet-god Mars and the planet-goddess Venus.  The original symbols are far simpler.”  Langdon drew another icon on the paper.

 

 

 

“This symbol is the original icon for male ,” he told her.  “A rudimentary phallus.”

“Quite to the point,” Sophie said.

“As it were,” Teabing added.

Langdon went on.  “This icon is formally known as the blade , and it represents aggression and manhood.  In fact, this exact phallus symbol is still used today on modern military uniforms to denote rank.”

“Indeed.”  Teabing grinned.  “The more penises you have, the higher your rank.  Boys will be boys.”

Langdon winced.  “Moving on, the female symbol, as you might imagine, is the exact opposite.”  He drew another symbol on the page.  “This is called the chalice .”

 

 

Sophie glanced up, looking surprised.

Langdon could see she had made the connection.  “The chalice,” he said, “resembles a cup or vessel, and more important, it resembles the shape of a woman’s womb.  This symbol communicates femininity, womanhood, and fertility.”

Langdon's simplified symbols, in disguised form, illustrate
a musical meditation on the misalignment of Mars and Venus—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11B/110720-Misaligned.jpg

This was adapted from an album cover by "Meyers/Monogram"—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11B/110720-BladeAndChalice-RomeoAndJuliet-500w.jpg

  See also Secret History and The Story of N.

Sunday, April 17, 2011

Sunday School

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 7:00 AM

Apollo and the Tricksters

From The Story of N (Oct. 15, 2010)—

Roberta Smith on what she calls "endgame art"—

"Fear of form above all means fear of compression— of an artistic focus that condenses experiences, ideas and feelings into something whole, committed and visually comprehensible."

Margaret Atwood on tricksters and art—

"If it’s a seamless whole you want, pray to Apollo."

Here is some related material In memory of CIA officer Clare Edward Petty, who died at 90 on March 18—

A review of a sort of storyteller's MacGuffin — the 3×3 grid. This is, in Smith's terms, an "artistic focus" that appears  to be visually comprehensible but is not as simple as it seems.

The Hesse configuration can serve as more than a sort of Dan Brown MacGuffin. As a post of January 14th notes, it can (rather fancifullly) illustrate the soul—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110417-AlderTilleyColoredSm.jpg

" … I feel I understand
Existence, or at least a minute part
Of my existence, only through my art,
In terms of combinational delight…."

— Vladimir Nabokov, Pale Fire

Friday, October 15, 2010

Mathematics and Narrative, continued

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 6:29 AM
 

The Story of N

http://www.log24.com/log/pix09/090109-Stories.jpg

Roberta Smith in the New York Times  of July 7, 2006

Art Review

Endgame Art? It's Borrow, Sample and Multiply in an Exhibition at Bard College

"… The show has an endgame, end-time mood, as if we are looking at the end of the end of the end of Pop, hyperrealism and appropriation art. The techniques of replication and copying have become so meticulous that they are beside the point. This is truly magic realism: the kind you can't see, that has to be explained. It is also a time when artists cultivate hybridism and multiplicity and disdain stylistic coherence, in keeping with the fashionable interest in collectivity, lack of ego, the fluidity of individual identity. But too often these avoidance tactics eliminate the thread of a personal sensibility or focus.

I would call all these strategies fear of form, which can be parsed as fear of materials, of working with the hands in an overt way and of originality. Most of all originality. Can we just say it? This far from Andy Warhol and Duchamp, the dismissal of originality is perhaps the oldest ploy in the postmodern playbook. To call yourself an artist at all is by definition to announce a faith, however unacknowledged, in some form of originality, first for yourself, second, perhaps, for the rest of us.

Fear of form above all means fear of compression— of an artistic focus that condenses experiences, ideas and feelings into something whole, committed and visually comprehensible. With a few exceptions, forms of collage and assemblage dominate this show: the putting together (or simply putting side by side) of existing images and objects prevails. The consistency of this technique in two and three dimensions should have been a red flag for the curators. Collage has driven much art since the late 1970's. Lately, and especially in this exhibition, it often seems to have become so distended and pulled apart that its components have become virtually autonomous and unrelated, which brings us back to square one. This is most obvious in the large installations of graphic works whose individual parts gain impact and meaning from juxtaposition but are in fact considered distinct artworks."

Margaret Atwood on art and the trickster

"The pleasures of fabulation, the charming and playful lie— this line of thought leads Hyde* to the last link in his subtitle, the connection of the trickster to art. Hyde reminds us that the wall between the artist and that American favourite son, the con-artist, can be a thin one indeed; that craft and crafty rub shoulders; and that the words artifice, artifact, articulation  and art  all come from the same ancient root, a word meaning 'to join,' 'to fit,' and 'to make.'  If it’s a seamless whole you want, pray to Apollo, who sets the limits within which such a work can exist.  Tricksters, however, stand where the door swings open on its hinges and the horizon expands: they operate where things are joined together, and thus can also come apart."

* Lewis Hyde, Trickster Makes This World: Mischief, Myth, and Art,  Farrar Straus & Giroux, January 1998

Smith mentions "an artistic focus that condenses experiences, ideas and feelings into something whole, committed and visually comprehensible."

Atwood mentions "a seamless whole."

For some related remarks, see "A Study in Art Education" and the central figure pictured above. (There "N" can stand for "number," "nine," or "narrative.")

Friday, January 9, 2009

Friday January 9, 2009

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 5:01 PM
Stories
for Mary Karr

"In reality, my prose books
probably sit between
I Was a Teenage Sex Slave
and some other contemporary
memoir written in five minutes…."

Mary Karr in the NY Times
of July 6, 2007

Story of M, Story of N, Story of O

See also
Ballet Blanc
and the true story
0, 1, 2, 3, ….

"In a dream scenario, my memoirs…
would find another shelf.
They’d sit between St. Augustine
  and Nabokov’s Speak, Memory…."

— Mary Karr, loc. cit.

Recall the
mnemonic rhyme
"Nine is a Vine."

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