Log24

Wednesday, November 4, 2020

The Summerfield Prize . . .

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 3:45 PM

Continues.

The author of A Piece of Justice , a 1995 novel about mathematics
and quilts, has died.

Walsh died on St. Luke’s Day.  Cf.  Luke in this journal.

Saturday, September 19, 2020

The Summerfield Prize

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 3:01 PM

“Like Coleridge” . . .

Related material:  Bloomsday 2006.

Wednesday, June 27, 2018

The Letterman Intro

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:28 AM

"Summerfield, Kummerhenge.  Kummerhenge, Summerfield."

Saturday, September 11, 2010

At Play in the Field

Filed under: General — m759 @ 3:24 AM

For Bent Larsen, Danish chess Grandmaster, who died on Thursday, September 9, 2010—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/100910-AtPlayInTheField-Lg.png

See also "Patrick Blackburn, meet Gideon Summerfield" in Building a Mystery.

"As you read, watch for patterns." — Nabokov

Thursday, September 9, 2010

Breakthrough

Filed under: General — m759 @ 3:48 PM

A film director's obituary in today's New York Times

"Mr. Donner broke through as a director in 1963 with a low-budget black-and-white film of Harold Pinter’s play 'The Caretaker,' with Alan Bates, Donald Pleasence and Robert Shaw. Since he couldn’t find traditional backing for the film, a group of well-wishers that included Elizabeth Taylor, Richard Burton, Peter Sellers and Noël Coward financed it."

   A lower-budget version:

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/100909-TheShining.jpg

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/100909-Caretaker.jpg

All work and no play 

makes Jack a dull boy.

 

See also "Patrick Blackburn, meet Gideon Summerfield" in Building a Mystery.

Building a Mystery

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 2:02 PM

Notes on Mathematics and Narrative, continued

Patrick Blackburn, meet Gideon Summerfield

From a summary of a politically correct 1995 feminist detective novel about quilts, A Piece of Justice

The story deals with “one Gideon Summerfield, deceased.” Summerfield, a former tutor at (the fictional) St. Agatha’s College, Cambridge University, “is about to become the recipient of the Waymark prize. This prize is awarded in Mathematics and has the same prestige as the Nobel. Summerfield had a rather lackluster career at St. Agatha’s, with the exception of one remarkable result that he obtained. It is for this result that he is being awarded the prize, albeit posthumously.”  Someone is apparently trying to prevent a biography of Summerfield from being published.

The following page contains a critical part of the solution to the mystery:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06B/PieceOfJustice138.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Compare and contrast with an episode from the resume of a real  Gideon Summerfield

Head of Strategy, Designer City (May 1999 — January 2002)

Secured Web agency business from new and existing clients with compelling digital media strategies and oversaw delivery of creative, production and technical teams…. Clients included… Greenfingers  and Lord of the Dance .

For material related to Greenfingers  and Lord of the Dance , see Castle Kennedy Gardens at Wicker Man  Locations.

Monday, July 27, 2009

Monday July 27, 2009

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 2:29 PM
Field Dance

The New York Times
on June 17, 2007:

 Design Meets Dance,
and Rules Are Broken

Yesterday's evening entry was
on the fictional sins of a fictional
mathematician and also (via a link
to St. Augustine's Day, 2006), on
the geometry of the I Ching* —

The eternal
combined with
the temporal:

Circular arrangement of I Ching hexagrams based on Singer 63-cycle in the Galois field GF(64)

The fictional mathematician's
name, noted here (with the Augustine-
I Ching link as a gloss) in yesterday's
evening entry, was Summerfield.

From the above Times article–
"Summerspace," a work by
 choreographer Merce Cunningham
and artist Robert Rauschenberg
that offers a competing
 vision of summer:

Summerspace — Set by Rauschenberg, choreography by Cunningham

Cunningham died last night.

John Cage, Merce Cunningham, Robert Rauschenberg in the 1960's

From left, composer John Cage,
choreographer Merce Cunningham,
and artist Robert Rauschenberg
in the 1960's

"When shall we three meet again?"

* Update of ca. 5:30 PM 7/27– today's online New York Times (with added links)– "The I Ching is the 'Book of Changes,' and Mr. Cunningham's choreography became an expression of the nature of change itself. He presented successive images without narrative sequence or psychological causation, and the audience was allowed to watch dance as one might watch successive events in a landscape or on a street corner."

Sunday, July 26, 2009

Sunday July 26, 2009

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 8:28 PM

Happy Birthday,
Inspector Tennison

'Prime Suspect'-- Helen Mirren as Inspector Tennison
(See entries of
November 13, 2006)

Library Thing book list: 'An Awkward Lie' and 'A Piece of Justice'

Related material
for Prospera:

  1. Jung’s Collected Works
  2. St. Augustine’s Day, 2006
    (as a gloss on the name
    Summerfield” in
    A Piece of Justice and on
    Inspector Tennison’s age today)
  3. Quilt Geometry

Sunday, December 10, 2006

Sunday December 10, 2006

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 PM
On This Date

“… in 1896 Alfred Nobel,
the inventor of dynamite and
founder of the Nobel prizes,
died in San Remo, Italy,
at age 63.”

— “Today in History,”
by The Associated Press

… And the Nobel Prize
     for Bullshit goes to…

David Titcher,

author and co-producer of
The Librarian: Quest for the Spear.


First Runner-up

A Piece of Justice.

From a summary of the novel:

The story deals with “one Gideon Summerfield, deceased.” Summerfield, a former tutor at (the fictional) St. Agatha’s College, Cambridge University, “is about to become the recipient of the Waymark prize. This prize is awarded in Mathematics and has the same prestige as the Nobel….”

Wednesday, December 6, 2006

Wednesday December 6, 2006

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 3:15 AM
Mathematical Imagery

From the current
American Mathematical Society
“Mathematical Imagery” page:

AMS Mathematical Imagery

From today’s New York Times:

Rosie Lee Tompkins obituary

“Rosie Lee Tompkins, a renowned African-American quiltmaker whose use of dazzling color and vivid geometric forms made her work internationally acclaimed despite her vehement efforts to remain completely unknown, was found dead on Friday at her home in Richmond, Calif. She was 70.” —Margalit Fox, NY Times 12/6/06
Tompkins was found dead
on December 1, 2006.
 From Log24 on that date:
The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06B/061201-DayWithout.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

That entry contained an excerpt from
Tom Wolfe’s The Painted Word

“What I saw before me was the critic-in-chief of The New York Times saying: In looking at a painting today, ‘to lack a persuasive theory is to lack something crucial.’ I read it again. It didn’t say ‘something helpful’ or ‘enriching’ or even ‘extremely valuable.’ No, the word was crucial….”

Related material:

Diamond Theory
 
and a politically correct
1995 feminist detective novel
about quilts,

A Piece of Justice.

From a summary of the novel:

The story deals with “one Gideon Summerfield, deceased.” Summerfield, a former tutor at (the fictional) St. Agatha’s College, Cambridge University, “is about to become the recipient of the Waymark prize. This prize is awarded in Mathematics and has the same prestige as the Nobel. Summerfield had a rather lackluster career at St. Agatha’s, with the exception of one remarkable result that he obtained. It is for this result that he is being awarded the prize, albeit posthumously.”  Someone is apparently trying to prevent a biography of Summerfield from being published.

The following page contains
a critical part of the solution
to the mystery:
The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06B/PieceOfJustice138.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Meanwhile, back in real life…

It is said that the late Ms. Tompkins
liked to work while listening to the
soundtrack of “Saturday Night Fever.”

“It’s just your jive talkin’
you’re telling me lies, yeah
Jive talkin’
you wear a disguise
Jive talkin’
so misunderstood, yeah
Jive talkin’
You really no good”

These lyrics may also serve
to summarize reviews
of Diamond Theory written
in the summer of 2005.

For further details, see
Mathematics and Narrative.

 

Friday, June 16, 2006

Friday June 16, 2006

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:00 AM

For Bloomsday 2006:

Hero of His Own Story

“The philosophic college should spare a detective for me.”

Stephen Hero.  Epigraph to Chapter 2, “Dedalus and the Beauty Maze,” in Joyce and Aquinas, by William T. Noon, S. J., Yale University Press, 1957 (in the Yale paperback edition of 1963, page 18)

“Dorothy Sayers makes a great deal of sense when she points out in her highly instructive and readable book The Mind of the Maker that ‘to complain that man measures God by his own measure is a waste of time; man measures everything by his own experience; he has no other yardstick.'”

— William T. Noon, S. J., Joyce and Aquinas (in the Yale paperback edition of 1963, page 106)

Related material:

  • Dorothy Sayers and Jill Paton Walsh
  • Jill Paton Walsh‘s detective novel A Piece of Justice (1995):
    “The mathematics of tilings and quilting play background
    roles in this mystery in which a graduate student attempts
    to write a biography of the (fictitious) mathematician
    Gideon Summerfield. Summerfield is about to posthumously
    receive the prestigious (and, I should point out, also fictitious)
    Waymark Prize in mathematics…but it soon becomes clear
    that someone with evil intentions does not want the student’s
    book to be published!
    By all accounts this is a well written mystery…the second by
    the author with college nurse Imogen Quy playing the role of
    the detective.”
    Mathematical Fiction by Alex Kasman,
    College of Charleston

AD PULCHRITUDINEM TRIA REQUIRUNTUR:
INTEGRITAS, CONSONANTIA, CLARITAS.

St. Thomas Aquinas

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