Log24

Wednesday, December 13, 2017

Trends

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 2:04 AM

"The philosopher Jerry Fodor was important for the same reason
you’ve probably never heard of him: he was unimpressed,
to put it politely, by the intellectual trends of the day."

—  Stephen Metcalf in The New Yorker , Dec. 12, 2017

See also "The French Invasion," a Dec. 11 Quarterly Conversation
essay about Derrida in Baltimore in 1966, and the Dec. 10 posts
in this  journal tagged Interlacing Derrida. (The deplorable Derrida
trend is apparently still alive in Buffalo.)

According to Metcalf, Fodor's "occasional review-essays in the L.R.B. 
were masterpieces of a plainspoken and withering sarcasm. To Steven
Pinker’s suggestion that we read fiction because ' it supplies us with a
mental catalogue of the fatal conundrums we might face someday,' for
instance, Fodor replied, ' What if it turns out that, having just used the ring
that I got by kidnapping a dwarf to pay off the giants who built me my
new castle, I should discover that it is the very ring that I need in order to
continue to be immortal and rule the world? ' "

In the Fodor-Pinker dispute, my sympathies are with Pinker.

Related material — Google Sutra (the previous Log24 post) and earlier posts
found in a Log24 search for Ring + Bear + Jung —

Four Colours and Waiting for Logos.

Sunday, December 10, 2017

Geometry

Filed under: G-Notes,General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 8:45 PM

Google search result for Plato + Statesman + interlacing + interweaving

See also Symplectic in this journal.

From Gotay and Isenberg, “The Symplectization of Science,”
Gazette des Mathématiciens  54, 59-79 (1992):

“… what is the origin of the unusual name ‘symplectic’? ….
Its mathematical usage is due to Hermann Weyl who,
in an effort to avoid a certain semantic confusion, renamed
the then obscure ‘line complex group’ the ‘symplectic group.’
… the adjective ‘symplectic’ means ‘plaited together’ or ‘woven.’
This is wonderfully apt….”

IMAGE- A symplectic structure -- i.e. a structure that is symplectic (meaning plaited or woven)

The above symplectic  figure appears in remarks on
the diamond-theorem correlation in the webpage
Rosenhain and Göpel Tetrads in PG(3,2). See also
related remarks on the notion of  linear  (or line ) complex
in the finite projective space PG(3,2) —

Anticommuting Dirac matrices as spreads of projective lines

Ron Shaw on the 15 lines of the classical generalized quadrangle W(2), a general linear complex in PG(3,2)

Numbers

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 4:10 PM

See also The Derrida Reader: Writing Performances, edited by
Julian Wolfreys (U. of Nebraska Press, 1998), pages 112-113,
discussed here in the previous two posts, and this  journal on
1/12-1/13. Related material: Polytropos .

Algebra

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:55 PM

Derrida quote from the previous post

See also Black + Algebra + Metaphor.

Interlacing, Interweaving

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:00 PM

The above title should be sung to the following tune

"Right through hell
 there is a path…."
 — Malcolm Lowry,
Under the Volcano

Tuesday, May 16, 2017

For Westworld’s Man in Black

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:00 PM

From University of Chicago Press in 1984:

'Erring,' by Mark C. Taylor, U. of Chicago Press, 1984

"Drawing on Hegel, Nietzsche, Derrida,
and others, Mark Taylor extends—and
goes well beyond—pioneering efforts. . . . "
—G. Douglas Atkins, 
Philosophy and Literature

Update at noon on May 16 —

"Follow the Blood Arroyo to the place
where the snake lays its eggs."

— Westworld, Season 1, Episode 2,
air date October 9, 2016

This suggests a review of Derrida + Serpent 
in this journal.

Sunday, August 9, 2015

Nine is a Vine

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 6:50 AM

Backstory:  That phrase in this journal.

““The serpent’s eyes shine
As he wraps around the vine….”
– Don Henley

With Derrida, as usual, playing the role of
the serpent, see a philosophical meditation from
October 9, 2014, by a perceptive and thoughtful Eve
that includes the following passage:

“But, before this and first of all, there is
the resistance posed by the work itself,
the hard kernel formed when the intelligibility
of a universal ‘message’ is joined to the
unintelligible secret of a singularity.”

See as well the word “kernel” here.

Wednesday, April 8, 2015

For Students of the Forked Tongue

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 8:42 PM

IMAGE- Daily Princetonian- U. acquires personal library of philosopher Jacques Derrida

See also "Derrida + Serpent" in this journal.

Tuesday, December 23, 2014

Stoicheia*

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:02 PM

See also Derrida + Serpent in this journal.

* See Stoicheia (Elements) in this journal.

Thursday, October 16, 2014

A Forkèd Tongue

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 5:20 PM

This post was suggested by today's previous posts, Broom Bridge Day
and Taking the Fork, as well as by Alyssa is  Wonderland.

For the meaning of the title, see Serpent + Derrida and Symbology.

Tuesday, January 17, 2012

Khora as Synchronicity

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 11:01 AM

A search for khora  + tao  yields a paper on Derrida

http://www.log24.com/log/pix12/120117-IanEdwards-OnKhora.gif

http://www.log24.com/log/pix12/120117-IanEdwards.jpg

A check of the above date— Nov. 18, 2010— yields…

Thursday, November 18, 2010

Frontiers of Speculation

 m759 @ 8:02 AM

Peter Woit has a post on Scientific American 's new Garrett Lisi article, "A Geometric Theory of Everything."

The Scientific American  subtitle is "Deep down, the particles and forces of the universe are a manifestation of exquisite geometry."

See also Rhetoric (Nov. 4, 2010) and Exquisite Geometries (May 19, 2009).

Related material on the temptation of physics
for a pure mathematician—

This morning's post on khora  and Cardinal Manning, and,
from Hawking's birthday this year, Big Apple.

Within this  post, by leading us to the apple,
Derrida as usual plays the role of Serpent.

Saturday, March 6, 2010

Deconstructing Alice

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Alyssa is  Wonderland

Manohla Dargis in The New York Times  yesterday

"Of course the character of Carroll’s original Alice is evident in each outrageous creation she dreams up in 'Wonderland' and in the sequel, 'Through the Looking-Glass,' which means that she’s a straight man to her own imagination. (She is  Wonderland.)"

Alyssa Milano as a child, with fork

From Inside the White Cube

"The sacramental nature of the space becomes clear, and so does one of the great projective laws of modernism: as modernism gets older, context becomes content. In a peculiar reversal, the object introduced into the gallery 'frames' the gallery and its laws."

From Yogi Berra–

"When you come to a fork in the road, take it."

Related material:  For Baron Samedi and…

Symbology
Robert Langdon (played by Tom Hanks) and a corner of Solomon's Cube
Jacques Derrida on the Looking-Glass garden, 'The Time before First,' and Solomon's seal

Friday, December 19, 2008

Friday December 19, 2008

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , , — m759 @ 1:06 PM
Inside the
White Cube

Part I: The White Cube

The Eightfold Cube

Part II: Inside
 
The Paradise of Childhood'-- Froebel's Third Gift

Part III: Outside

Mark Tansey, 'The Key' (1984)

Click to enlarge.

Mark Tansey, The Key (1984)

For remarks on religion
related to the above, see
Log24 on the Garden of Eden
and also Mark C. Taylor,
"What Derrida Really Meant"
(New York Times, Oct. 14, 2004).

For some background on Taylor,
see Wikipedia. Taylor, Chairman
of the Department of Religion
at
Columbia University, has a
1973 doctorate in religion from
Harvard University. His opinion
of Derrida indicates that his
sympathies lie more with
the serpent than with the angel
in the Tansey picture above.

For some remarks by Taylor on
the art of Tansey relevant to the
structure of the white cube
(Part I above), see Taylor's
The Picture in Question:
Mark Tansey and the
Ends of Representation

(U. of Chicago Press, 1999):

From Chapter 3,
"Sutures* of Structures," p. 58:

"What, then, is a frame, and what is frame work?

This question is deceptive in its simplicity. A frame is, of course, 'a basic skeletal structure designed to give shape or support' (American Heritage Dictionary)…. when the frame is in question, it is difficult to determine what is inside and what is outside. Rather than being on one side or the other, the frame is neither inside nor outside. Where, then, Derrida queries, 'does the frame take place….'"

* P. 61:
"… the frame forms the suture of structure. A suture is 'a seamless [sic**] joint or line of articulation,' which, while joining two surfaces, leaves the trace of their separation."

 ** A dictionary says "a seamlike joint or line of articulation," with no mention of "trace," a term from Derrida's jargon.

Friday, December 12, 2008

Friday December 12, 2008

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:24 PM
Back to the Garden
of Forking Paths

“Somehow it seems to fill my head with ideas– only I don’t exactly know what they are!…. Let’s have a look at the garden first!”

— A passage from Lewis Carroll’s Through the Looking-Glass. The “garden” part– but not the “ideas” part– was quoted by Jacques Derrida in Dissemination in the epigraph to Chapter 7, “The Time before First.”

“‘For you… he… we aren’t meaning…’ She was almost stammering, as if she were trying to say several things at once…. Suddenly she gave a little tortured scream. ‘O!’ she cried, ‘O! I can’t keep up! it keeps dividing! There’s too many things to think of!'”

— A passage from Charles Williams’s The Place of the Lion, Chapter 12.

“He was thinking faster than he had ever done, and questions rose out of nothing and followed each other– what was to will? Will was determination to choose– what was choice? How could there be choice, unless there was preference, and if there was preference there was no choice, for it was not possible to choose against that preferring nature which was his being; yet being consisted in choice, for only by taking and doing this and not that could being know itself, could it indeed be; to be then consisted in making an inevitable choice, and all that was left was to know the choice, yet even then was the chosen thing the same as the nature that chose, and if not… So swiftly the questions followed each other that he seemed to be standing in flashing coils of subtlety, an infinite ring of vivid intellect and more than intellect, for these questions were not of the mind alone but absorbed into themselves physical passion and twined through all his nature on an unceasing and serpentine journey.”

— A passage from The Place of the Lion, Chapter 10.

Do you like apples?

Good Will Hunting

Tuesday, March 22, 2005

Tuesday March 22, 2005

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 4:00 PM
The Enemy

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050322-Derrida.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

See Remembering Jacques Derrida.

"There is no teacher but the enemy."

— Orson Scott Card, Ender's Game,
   Tor paperback reprint, 1994, p. 262

"Différance is, for Derrida, the key concept
in order to understand what is here at stake."

Lacan The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050322-Diamond.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors. Derrida, by Frida Saal

The following entries from October 2004
are related to the death of Jacques Derrida.

 

Saturday, October 9, 2004  6:40 PM

Derrida Dead

"Jacques Derrida, the Algerian-born, French intellectual who became one of the most celebrated and unfathomable philosophers of the late 20th century, died Friday at a Paris hospital, the French president's office announced. He was 74."

— Jonathan Kandell, New York Times

"There is no teacher but the enemy."

— Orson Scott Card, Ender's Game,
   Tor paperback reprint, 1994, p. 262
 


Saturday, October 9, 2004  2:22 AM

Belief

KERRY: "I'm going to be a president who believes in science."

KERRY: "I'm a Catholic – raised a Catholic. I was an altar boy. Religion has been a huge part of my life, helped lead me through a war, leads me today."

BUSH: "Trying to decipher that."
 


Friday, October 8, 2004  5:07 PM

Behush the Bush
 

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix04A/041008-JoyceBush.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
James Joyce statue, Zurich

"There's where. First.
We pass through grass
behush the bush to."
— Final page of
Finnegans Wake

"… we all gain an appreciation of how each of us can provide readings that others are blind to and how each of us is temporarily blind to other feasible readings. Reading the text becomes a communal act of discovery….

No one has much to say, for now, about the grass reference…."

Reading Finnegans Wake (1986)

The phrase "snake in the grass" seems relevant, as does the opening of Finnegans Wake:

riverrun, past Eve and Adam's….

Related material:

Joyce and Tao,

Why Me?,

Serpent's Tail Publishing,

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix04A/041008-Serpent.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

and, for Matt Damon,
whose birthday is today —

The Joyce Identity.
 

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