Log24

Friday, April 6, 2018

Watching the Zero

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:00 PM

From "The Blacklist" Season 5, Episode 11 —

– Remind me again what it is that we think we're doing here.
– The phone acts as a passive packet sniffer.
It's a trick Tom taught me.
– Packet sniffer? Ugh.
– The FBI uses them.
I'm sure your tech people know all about them.
It can intercept and log traffic that passes over a digital network.
– It is an absolute mystery to me how these gadgets work —
the Dick Tracy phones, these blueteeth connections.
Quite frankly, I miss the rotary phone.
Except for that zero.
Watching that zero crawl back.
Oh, my God.
It was painful.
– We have the code.
– Great.

Read more:  https://www.springfieldspringfield.co.uk/
view_episode_scripts.php?
tv-show=the-blacklist&episode=s05e11

And more:

Philip J. Davis reportedly turned 86 on January 2, 2009.
An image from this journal on that date

Rotary telephone dial

“You have the incorrect number.
I will tell you what you are doing:
you are turning the letter O
instead of the zero.”

— "Symbols and Signs,"
Vladimir Nabokov, 1948

Plan 9

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:18 PM

Salinger's 'Nine Stories,' paperback with 3x3 array of titles on cover, adapted in a Jan. 2, 2009, Log24 post on Nabokov's 1948 'Signs and Symbols'

Friday, January 2, 2009

Friday January 2, 2009

Filed under: General — m759 @ 5:48 AM
Signs and Symbols

continued…
from the five entries
ending on June 3, 2008
and from yesterday,
New Year’s Day

The end of a story by Vladimir Nabokov in The New Yorker of May 15, 1948:

Rotary telephone dial

“You have the incorrect number. I will tell you what you are doing: you are turning the letter O instead of the zero.”

They sat down to their unexpected festive midnight tea. The birthday present stood on the table. He sipped noisily; his face was flushed; every now and then he imparted a circular motion to his raised glass so as to make the sugar dissolve more thoroughly. The vein on the side of his bald head where there was a large birthmark stood out conspicuously and, although he had shaved that morning, a silvery bristle showed on his chin. While she poured him another glass of tea, he put on his spectacles and re-examined with pleasure the luminous yellow, green, red little jars. His clumsy moist lips spelled out their eloquent labels: apricot, grape, beech plum, quince. He had got to crab apple, when the telephone rang again.

Art based on a cover of Salinger's 'Nine Stories'

Click for details.

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