Log24

Friday, September 1, 2017

Krell’s Journal

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 11:45 AM

See references to Krell in this journal.

IMDb > Chief Quinn (Character)
From Forbidden Planet (1956) —
Chief Engineer Quinn I'll bet any quantum mechanic
in the service would give the rest of his life to fool around
with this gadget. 

Related material from the above search for Krell

Monday, April 10, 2017

Heidegger for Passover

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 12:00 PM

From this  journal on August 7, 2010  (footnotes added today) —

The title of this post, "Rift Designs," is taken from Heidegger.

From a recent New Yorker  review of Absence of Mind  by Marilynne Robinson—

"Robinson is eloquent in her defense of the mind’s prerogatives, but her call for a renewed metaphysics might be better served by rereading Heidegger than by dusting off the Psalms."

Following this advice, we find—

"Propriation1 gathers the rift-design2 of the saying and unfolds it3  in such a way that it becomes the well-joined structure4 of a manifold showing."

— p. 415 of Heidegger's Basic Writings , edited by David Farrell Krell, HarperCollins paperback, 1993

"Das Ereignis versammelt den Aufriß der Sage und entfaltet ihn zum Gefüge des vielfältigen Zeigens." 

— Heidegger, Weg zur Sprache

1. "Mirror-Play of the Fourfold"

2. "Christ descending into the abyss"

3. Barrancas of Cuernavaca

4. Combinatorics, Philosophy, Geometry

Friday, December 11, 2015

Science and Opinion

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 9:23 PM

For readers of recent Log24 posts mentioning artificial intelligence
(Church for Rebecca) and Pluto (Street View) —

Times Wire  this afternoon

The post mentioning Pluto contained David Farrell Krell's
misleading conflation of Goethe's "Plutus, god of plenty" 
with Pluto, "king of the domain of the dead."

For some background on Plutus, see Wikipedia.

For some background on Pluto by an author I much prefer to Krell,
see A Shadow for Groundhog Day  (this journal, February 2, 2014).

Spoilers

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 2:23 PM

In memory of Michael Crichton, Harvard '64.

Those who have not yet seen the 1956 classic Forbidden Planet
should skip this post. For those who know and love it, here is an
aide-mémoire .

Street View

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 2:00 PM

Continued from Once Upon a Matrix  (November 27, 2015).

Click image below to enlarge.

“… Which makes it a gilt-edged priority that one  of us 
 gets into that Krell lab and takes that brain boost.”

— American adaptation of Shakespeare's Tempest , 1956

Midrash —

"Remember me to Herald Square."

Friday, November 27, 2015

Once Upon a Matrix

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 10:20 PM

Or:  The Strife of Luminosity and Obscurity

(Continued from "Once Upon a Time," November 25, 2015)

Diamond Theory version of 'The Square Inch Space' with yin-yang symbol for comparison


Einstein and Geometry

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 2:01 PM

(A Prequel to Dirac and Geometry)

"So Einstein went back to the blackboard.
And on Nov. 25, 1915, he set down
the equation that rules the universe.
As compact and mysterious as a Viking rune,
it describes space-time as a kind of sagging mattress…."

— Dennis Overbye in The New York Times  online,
     November 24, 2015

Some pure  mathematics I prefer to the sagging Viking mattress —

Readings closely related to the above passage —

Thomas Hawkins, "From General Relativity to Group Representations:
the Background to Weyl's Papers of 1925-26
," in Matériaux pour
l'histoire des mathématiques au XXe siècle:
Actes du colloque
à la mémoire de Jean Dieudonné
, Nice, 1996  (Soc. Math.
de France, Paris, 1998), pp. 69-100.

The 19th-century algebraic theory of invariants is discussed
as what Weitzenböck called a guide "through the thicket
of formulas of general relativity."

Wallace Givens, "Tensor Coordinates of Linear Spaces," in
Annals of Mathematics  Second Series, Vol. 38, No. 2, April 1937, 
pp. 355-385.

Tensors (also used by Einstein in 1915) are related to 
the theory of line complexes in three-dimensional
projective space and to the matrices used by Dirac
in his 1928 work on quantum mechanics.

For those who prefer metaphors to mathematics —

"We acknowledge a theorem's beauty
when we see how the theorem 'fits' in its place,
how it sheds light around itself, like a Lichtung ,
a clearing in the woods." 
— Gian-Carlo Rota, Indiscrete Thoughts ,
Birkhäuser Boston, 1997, page 132

Rota fails to cite the source of his metaphor.
It is Heidegger's 1964 essay, "The End of Philosophy
and the Task of Thinking" —

"The forest clearing [ Lichtung ] is experienced
in contrast to dense forest, called Dickung  
in our older language." 
— Heidegger's Basic Writings 
edited by David Farrell Krell, 
Harper Collins paperback, 1993, page 441

Friday, May 4, 2012

That Krell Lab (continued)

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 12:00 PM

“… Which makes it a gilt-edged priority that one  of us
 gets into that Krell lab and takes that brain boost.”

— American adaptation of Shakespeare's Tempest , 1956

From "The Onto-theological Origin of Play:
Heraclitus and Plato," by Yücel Dursun, in
Lingua ac Communitas  Vol 17 (October 2007)—

"Heraclitus’s Aion and His Transformations

 The saying is as follows:

αἰὼν παῖς ἐστι παίζων, πεττεύων·
παιδὸς ἡ βασιληίη

(Aion is a child playing draughts;
the kingship is the child’s)

(Krell 1972: 64).*

 * KRELL, David Farrell.
   “Towards an Ontology of Play:
   Eugen Fink’s Notion of Spiel,”
   Research in Phenomemology ,
   2, 1972: 63-93.

This is the translation of the fragment in Greek by Krell.
There are many versions of the translation of the fragment….."

See also Child's Play and Froebel's Magic Box.

Update of May 5— For some background
from the date May 4 seven years ago, see
The Fano Plane Revisualized.

For some background on the word "aion,"
see that word in this journal.

Friday, March 30, 2012

Meanwhile… (continued)

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 9:09 AM

In memory of actor Warren Stevens

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10A/100711-LanguageLab.jpg

“… Which makes it a gilt-edged priority that one  of us
 gets into that Krell lab and takes that brain boost.”

— American adaptation of Shakespeare's Tempest , 1956

Some other dialogue—

"Where is the cat?" he asked at last.

"Where is the box?"

"Here."

"Where's here?"

"Here is now."

"We used to think so," I said,
"but really we should use larger boxes."

— "Schrödinger's Cat,"
by Ursula K. Le Guin (1974)

Saturday, August 7, 2010

Rift Designs

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 8:28 PM

From the current index to obituaries at Telegraph.co.uk—

Teufel is also featured in today's New York Times

"Mr. Teufel became a semicelebrity, helped in no small part by his last name, which means 'devil' in German."

From Group Analysis ,  June 1993, vol. 26 no. 2, 203-212—

The Problem of Good and Evil

by Ronald Sandison, Ledbury, Herefordshire HR8 2EY, UK

In my contribution to the Group Analysis Special Section: "Aspects of Religion in Group Analysis" (Sandison, 1993) I hinted that any consideration of a spiritual dimension to the group involves us in a discussion on whether we are dealing with good or evil spirits. But if we say that God is in the group, why is not the Devil there also? Can good and evil coexist in the same group matrix? Is the recognition of evil "nothing but" the ability to distinguish between good and bad? If not, then what is evil? Is it no more than the absence of good?

These and other questions were worked on at a joint Institute of Group Analysis and Group-Analytic Society (London) Workshop entitled "The Problem of Good and Evil." We considered the likelihood that good and evil coexist in all of us, as well as in the whole of the natural world, not only on earth, but in the cosmos and in God himself What we actually do with good and evil is to split them apart, thereby shelving the problem but at the same time creating irreconcilable opposites. This article examines this splitting and how we can work with it psychoanalytically.

This suggests a biblical remark—

"Now there was a day… when the sons of God
came to present themselves before the Lord,
and Satan came also among them."

Job 1:6, quoted by Chesterton in The Man Who Was Thursday

Sandison died on June 18. See the Thursday, August 5, Log24 post "The Matrix."

Teufel died on July 6. See the Log24 posts for that day.

The title of this  post, "rift designs," refers to a recurring theme in the July 6 posts. It is taken from Heidegger.

From a recent New Yorker  review of Absence of Mind  by Marilynne Robinson—

"Robinson is eloquent in her defense of the mind’s prerogatives, but her call for a renewed metaphysics might be better served by rereading Heidegger than by dusting off the Psalms."

Following this advice, we find—

"Propriation gathers the rift-design of the saying and unfolds it  in such a way that it becomes the well-joined structure of a manifold showing."

p. 415 of Heidegger's Basic Writings , edited by David Farrell Krell, HarperCollins paperback, 1993

"Das Ereignis versammelt den Aufriß der Sage und entfaltet ihn zum Gefüge des vielfältigen Zeigens." 

— Heidegger, Weg zur Sprache

Sunday, July 11, 2010

Language Lab

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 11:02 AM

From a search in this journal for "Krell"—

Dialogue from an American adaptation of Shakespeare's Tempest

“… Which makes it a gilt-edged priority that one  of us
 gets into that Krell lab and takes that brain boost.”

– Taken from a video, Forbidden Planet Monster Attack

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10A/100711-LanguageLab.jpg

From yesterday's A Manifold Showing

"Propriation gathers the rift-design of the saying and unfolds it
in such a way that it becomes the well-joined structure of a manifold showing."
(p. 415 of Heidegger's Basic Writings, edited by David Farrell Krell,
HarperCollins paperback, 1993)

German versions found on the Web—

„Das Ereignis versammelt den Aufriß der Sage und entfaltet ihn zum Gefüge des vielfältigen Zeigens.“ 323

323 Heidegger, Weg zur Sprache, S. 259.

"Das Regende im Zeigen der Sage ist das Eignen. Es erbringt das An- und Abwesen in sein jeweilig Eigenes, aus dem dieses sich an ihm selbst zeigt und nach seiner Art verweilt. Das erbringende Eignen, das die Sage als die Zeige in ihrem Zeigen regt, heiße das Ereignen. Es er-gibt das Freie der Lichtung, in die Anwesendes anwähren, aus der Abwesendes entgehen und im Entzug sein Währen behalten kann. Was das Ereignen durch die Sage ergibt, ist nie Wirkung einer Ursache, nicht die Folge eines Grundes. Das erbringende Eignen, das Ereignen, ist gewährender als jedes Wirken, Machen und Gründen. Das Ereignende ist das Ereignis selbst – und nichts außerdem. Das Ereignis, im Zeigen der Sage erblickt, läßt sich weder als ein Vorkommnis noch als ein Geschehen vorstellen, sondern nur im Zeigen der Sage als das Gewährende erfahren. Es gibt nichts anderes, worauf das Ereignis noch zurückführt, woraus es gar erklärt werden könnte. Das Ereignen ist kein Ergebnis (Resultat) aus anderem, aber die Er-gebnis, deren reichendes Geben erst dergleichen wie ein `Es gibt' gewährt, dessen auch noch `das Sein' bedarf, um als Anwesen in sein Eigenes zu gelangen. Das Ereignis versammelt den Aufriß der Sage und entfaltet ihn zum Gefüge des Vielfältigen Zeigens. Das Ereignis ist das Unscheinbarste des Unscheinbaren, das Einfachste des Einfachen, das Nächste des Nahen und das Fernste des Fernen, darin wir Sterbliche uns zeitlebens aufhalten." 8

8 M. Heidegger: Unterwegs zur Sprache. S. 258 f.

From Google Translate:

"The event brings together the outline of the legend and unfolds it to the structure of the manifold showing."

Saturday, July 10, 2010

A Manifold Showing

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 7:11 AM

"Heidegger suggests that we experience the saying of language as a shining forth:

'It lets what is coming to presence shine forth, lets what is withdrawing into absence vanish.  The saying is by no means the supplemental linguistic expression of what shines forth; rather, all shining and fading depend on the saying that shows.' (pp. 413-414).

But what is the basis and origin of this possibility of saying?  The happening of saying in the clearing, its allowing things to shine forth, can also be called an 'owning.' Owning is the event of a thing’s coming into its own, of its showing itself as itself. Heidegger also calls it 'propriating,' 'en-owning,' or Ereignis:

'Propriation gathers the rift-design of the saying and unfolds it in such a way that it becomes the well-joined structure of a manifold showing. (p. 415)'"

— "Heidegger: On the Way to Language," by Paul Livingston

Page references are apparently to Heidegger's Basic Writings, edited by David Farrell Krell, HarperCollins paperback, 1993.

See also Shining Forth.

Wednesday, July 29, 2009

Wednesday July 29, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 12:21 PM
Kaleideion

Adam and God (Sistine Chapel), with Jungian Self-Symbol and Ojo de Dios (The Diamond Puzzle)

Related material:

“A great deal has been made of the fact that Forbidden Planet is essentially William Shakespeare’s The Tempest (1611) in an science-fiction setting. It is this that transforms Forbidden Planet into far more than a mere pulp science-fiction story” — Richard Scheib

Dialogue from Forbidden Planet


“… Which makes it a gilt-edged priority that one of us gets into that Krell lab and takes that brain boost.”

Dialogue from another story —

“They thought they were doing a linear magnification, sort of putting me through a  magnifying glass.”

“Sizewise?”

“Brainwise, but what they did was multiply me by myself into a quadratic.”

Psychoshop, by Bester and Zelazny, 1998 paperback, p. 7

“… which would produce a special being– by means of that ‘cloned quadratic crap.’ [P. 75] The proper term sounds something like ‘Kaleideion‘….”

“So Adam is a Kaleideion?”

She shook her head.

“Not a Kaleideion. The Kaleideion….”

Psychoshop, 1998 paperback, p. 85


See also

Changing Woman:

“Kaleidoscope turning…

Juliette Binoche in 'Blue'  The 24 2x2 Cullinane Kaleidoscope animated images

Shifting pattern within   
unalterable structure…”
— Roger Zelazny, Eye of Cat  

“When life itself seems lunatic,
who knows where madness lies?”

— For the source, see 
Joyce’s Nightmare Continues.

Sunday, April 12, 2009

Sunday April 12, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 3:09 AM
Where Entertainment
Is God
, continued

Dialogue from the classic film Forbidden Planet

“… Which makes it a gilt-edged priority that one of us gets into that Krell lab and takes that brain boost.”

— Taken from a video (5:18-5:24 of 6:09) at David Lavery’s weblog in the entry of Tuesday, April 7.

(Cf. this journal on that date.)

Thanks to Professor Lavery for his detailed notes on his viewing experiences.

My own viewing recently included, on the night of Good Friday, April 10, the spiritually significant film Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull.

The mystic circle of 13 aliens at the end of that film, together with Leslie Nielsen’s Forbidden Planet remark quoted above, suggests the following:

“The aim of Conway’s game M13 is to get the hole at the top point and all counters in order 1,2,…,12 when moving clockwise along the circle.” —Lieven Le Bruyn

http://www.log24.com/log/pix09/090411-M13.gif

The illustration is from the weblog entry by Lieven Le Bruyn quoted below. The colored circles represent 12 of the 13 projective points described below, the 13 radial strokes represent the 13 projective lines, and the straight lines in the picture, including those that form the circle, describe which projective points are incident with which projective lines. The dot at top represents the “hole.”

From “The Mathieu Group M12 and Conway’s M13-Game” (pdf), senior honors thesis in mathematics by Jeremy L. Martin under the supervision of Professor Noam D. Elkies, Harvard University, April 1, 1996–

“Let P3 denote the projective plane of order 3. The standard construction of P3 is to remove the zero point from a three-dimensional vector space over the field F3 and then identify each point x with -x, obtaining a space with (33 – 1)/2 = 13 points. However, we will be concerned only with the geometric properties of the projective plane. The 13 points of P3 are organized into 13 lines, each line containing four points. Every point lies on four lines, any two points lie together on a unique line, and any two lines intersect at a unique point….

Conway [3] proposed the following game…. Place twelve numbered counters on the points… of P3 and leave the thirteenth point… blank. (The empty point will be referred to throughout as the “hole.”) Let the location of the hole be p; then a primitive move of the game consists of selecting one of the lines containing the hole, say {p, q, r, s}. Move the counter on q to p (thus moving the hole to q), then interchange the counters on r and s….

There is an obvious characterization of a move as a permutation in S13, operating on the points of P3. By limiting our consideration to only those moves which return the hole to its starting point…. we obtain the Conway game group. This group, which we shall denote by GC, is a subgroup of the symmetric group S12 of permutations of the twelve points…, and the group operation of GC is concatenation of paths. Conway [3] stated, but did not prove explicitly, that GC is isomorphic to the Mathieu group M12. We shall subsequently verify this isomorphism.

The set of all moves (including those not fixing the hole) is given the name M13 by Conway. It is important that M13 is not a group….”

[3] John H. Conway, “Graphs and Groups and M13,” Notes from New York Graph Theory Day XIV (1987), pp. 18–29.


Another exposition (adapted to Martin’s notation) by Lieven le Bruyn (see illustration above):

“Conway’s puzzle M13 involves the 13 points and 13 lines of P3. On all but one point numbered counters are placed holding the numbers 1,…,12 and a move involves interchanging one counter and the ‘hole’ (the unique point having no counter) and interchanging the counters on the two other points of the line determined by the first two points. In the picture [above] the lines are represented by dashes around the circle in between two counters and the points lying on this line are those that connect to the dash either via a direct line or directly via the circle. In the first part we saw that the group of all reachable positions in Conway’s M13 puzzle having the hole at the top position contains the sporadic simple Mathieu group M12 as a subgroup.”

For the religious significance of the circle of 13 (and the “hole”), consider Arthur and the 12 knights of the round table, et cetera.

But seriously…
 
Delmore Schwartz, 'Starlight Like Intuition Pierced the Twelve'

Wednesday, October 11, 2006

Wednesday October 11, 2006

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 11:07 AM
Ticket Home

  

Yesterday’s Pennsylvania
Lottery numbers:

Mid-day 266
Evening 529

Related material:

The 266-Day Method

and

The Shining of May 29

(Wednesday, May 29, 2002)

Commentary on Hexagram 29:
“K’an represents…
the principle of light
inclosed in the dark.”

— Richard Wilhelm,
Translation of the I Ching

“How do we explain
the mathematical
if not by mathematics?”

  — Rhetorical question 
of Martin Heidegger

(Page 273 of Heidegger’s
Basic Writings,
edited by David Farrell Krell,
Harper Collins paperback, 1993)

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