Log24

Sunday, April 28, 2013

Red October’s Sermon

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:30 AM

For the Harvard Arts Weekend:

"Grids, You Say?" by Josefine Lyche, with
Lyche's quotation from Rosalind Krauss in October
(Vol. 9, Summer 1979) —

IMAGE- 'Grids, You Say?' by Josefine Lyche, with Lyche's quotation of Rosalind Krauss

See also last evening's Elevation of the Host, with Vampire Weekend.

"For every kind of vampire, there is a kind of cross." — Gravity's Rainbow

Saturday, October 6, 2012

Red October, continued*

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 11:00 AM

"At Cambridge, where he studied in the 30s, he had
a reputation for omniscience. Running the local
Communist party cell from the set of college rooms
beneath Wittgenstein's, the youthful Hobsbawm was
invited to join the exclusive Apostles society."

Mark Mazower  in The Guardian , Oct. 1, 2012

* See related posts from Oct. 1, 2, and 5, 2012.

Tuesday, October 2, 2012

Red October

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:00 PM

(Continued)

IMAGE- Klein-group picture by Rosalind Krauss in essay titled 'In the Master's Bedroom'

"In the master's bedroom, they gathered for the feast…."
— Suggested by the current film Hotel Transylvania

"For every kind of vampire, there is a kind of cross."
– Thomas Pynchon, Gravity's Rainbow

Related material— the Feast of Saint Patrick in 2009.

Saturday, July 14, 2018

Enchantment Under the Sea*

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:37 PM

The title is that of a fictional high school dance on November 12, 1955,
in the 1985 film “Back to the Future.”

A real  high school dance from that era —

“The Class History was reviewed by Scott Mohr.”

See also Scott Mohr in Log24 posts tagged Back to the Future.

“… the Prom carried out a Moonlight and Roses theme….”
Warren Times Mirror, Warren, PA, 2 June 1958, page 7 (above)

Related musical themes from a few years earlier —

See as well the 1955 film “Blackboard Jungle” in this journal.

*For some variations on the title theme, see Red October.

Saturday, October 14, 2017

In Principio:

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Red October  continues …

See also Molloy in this  journal.

Related art  theory —

Geometry of the 4×4 Square 

Thursday, March 30, 2017

The Internet Abyss

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 3:09 PM

Suggested by the previous post, The Crimson Abyss

“Wer mit Ungeheuern kämpft, mag zusehn, dass er nicht dabei
zum Ungeheuer wird. Und wenn du lange in einen Abgrund blickst,
blickt der Abgrund auch in dich hinein.”

“He who fights with monsters should look to it that he himself
does not become a monster. And if you gaze long into an abyss,
the abyss also gazes into you.”

—  Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil , Aphorism 146

From the Internet Abyss on Red October Day, October 25, 2010 —

An image reproduced in this  journal on that same day

Image-- 'Then a miracle occurs' cartoon

Cartoon by S.Harris

Sunday, September 27, 2015

Box Office

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 2:01 PM

This suggests the recent link (in the Sept. 22 post Geometry for Jews)
to the post Red October (Oct. 2, 2012).  That post mentioned the first
version of Hotel Transylvania.

See also Mary Karr's look at American culture in today's NY Times
Sunday Book Review .

Tuesday, September 22, 2015

Geometry for Jews

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 2:01 PM

(Continued)

Remarks by an ignorant professor quoted here
yesterday suggest a Log24 search for "Lost in Translation."
That search yields instances of the following figure

Klein four-group

See also the post Red October (Oct. 2, 2012).

Wednesday, October 2, 2013

Color News

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:25 AM

See also "Red October" in this  journal.

Monday, October 8, 2012

This Poet You’ve Snatched

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:09 PM

IMAGE- Oct. 7, 2012 post by Margaret Soltan with passages by Salinger on education and DeLillo on hat measurements

Some background from today's New York Times

IMAGE- Oct. 8, 2012, NY Times obituary for Vietnamese imprisoned poet

From DeLillo's novel Mao II  in  the paragraph immediately preceding
the Ritz-hat passage quoted by Soltan—

"He could have told George he was writing about the hostage to bring him back, to return a meaning that had been lost to the world when they locked him in that room. Maybe that was it. When you inflict punishment on someone who is not guilty, when you fill rooms with innocent victims, you begin to empty the world of meaning and erect a separate mental state, the mind consuming what's outside itself, replacing real things with plots and fictions. One fiction taking the world narrowly into itself, the other fiction pushing out toward the social order, trying to unfold into it. He could have told George a writer creates a character as a way to reveal consciousness, increase the flow of meaning. This is how we reply to power and beat back our fear. By extending the pitch of consciousness and human possibility. This poet you've snatched. His detention drains the world of one more thimble of meaning."

For related ways of draining the world of meaning, see the politically loaded leftist vocabulary of International Art English

IAE has a distinctive lexicon: aporia , radically , space , proposition , biopolitical , tension , transversal , autonomy . An artist’s work inevitably interrogates, questions, encodes, transforms, subverts, imbricates, displaces—though often it doesn’t do these things so much as it serves to, functions to, or seems to (or might seem to) do these things.  [Alix Rule and David Levine, July 30, 2012]

See also this evening's post Issue 16.

Issue 16

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , — m759 @ 8:14 PM

From triplecanopy, Issue 16 —

International Art English, by Alix Rule and David Levine (July 30, 2012)

… In what follows, we examine some of the curious lexical, grammatical, and stylistic features of what we call International Art English. We consider IAE’s origins, and speculate about the future of this language through which contemporary art is created, promoted, sold, and understood. Some will read our argument as an overelaborate joke. But there’s nothing funny about this language to its users. And the scale of its use testifies to the stakes involved. We are quite serious….*

Space  is an especially important word in IAE and can refer to a raft of entities not traditionally thought of as spatial (the space of humanity ) as well as ones that are in most circumstances quite obviously spatial (the space of the gallery ). An announcement for the 2010 exhibition “Jimmie Durham and His Metonymic Banquet,” at Proyecto de Arte Contemporáneo Murcia in Spain, had the artist “questioning the division between inside and outside in the Western sacred space”—the venue was a former church—“to highlight what is excluded in order to invest the sanctum with its spatial purity. Pieces of cement, wire, refrigerators, barrels, bits of glass and residues of ‘the sacred,’ speak of the space of the exhibition hall … transforming it into a kind of ‘temple of confusion.’”

Spatial and nonspatial space are interchangeable in IAE. The critic John Kelsey, for instance, writes that artist Rachel Harrison “causes an immediate confusion between the space of retail and the space of subjective construction.” The rules for space  in this regard also apply to field , as in “the field of the real”—which is where, according to art historian Carrie Lambert-Beatty, “the parafictional has one foot.” (Prefixes like para -, proto -, post -, and hyper – expand the lexicon exponentially and Germanly, which is to say without adding any new words.) It’s not just that IAE is rife with spacey terms like intersection , parallel , parallelism , void , enfold , involution , and platform …

* Footnote not in the original—
  See also Geometry and Death from the date of the above article.

Air America

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 4:00 AM

Related entertainment—

The song being performed in the above trailer 
for Air America  is "A Horse with No Name."

See  "Instantia Crucis" and "Winning."

Friday, October 5, 2012

Where Madness Lies

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 7:29 PM

(Continued from Tuesday, Oct. 2)

From today's online New York Times

"The Schoenberg proved the highlight of the evening,
sandwiched between polished but otherwise routine
performances of Bach’s Keyboard Concerto No. 1
in D minor and Mozart’s Symphony No. 36 ('Linz'),
which ended the evening."

From a Wikipedia article— 

The Jew of Linz  is a controversial 1998 book by Australian writer Kimberley Cornish. It alleges that the Austrian philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein had a profound effect on Adolf Hitler when they were both pupils at the Realschule (lower secondary school) in Linz, Austria, in the early 1900s.

One section of the article—

No-ownership theory of mind
Other sections of the book deal with Cornish's theories about what he claims are the common roots of Wittgenstein's and Hitler's philosophies in mysticism, magic, and the "no-ownership" theory of mind. Cornish sees this as Wittgenstein's generalisation of Schopenhauer's account of the Unity of the Will, in which despite appearances, there is only a single Will acting through the bodies of all creatures. This doctrine, generalized to other mental faculties such as thinking, is presented in Ralph Waldo Emerson's "Essays". The doctrine, writes Cornish, was also held by the Oxford philosopher R. G. Collingwood who was one of Wittgenstein's electors to his Cambridge chair. Cornish tries to tie this to Wittgenstein's arguments against the idea of "mental privacy" and in conclusion says "I have attempted to locate the source of the Holocaust in a perversion of early Aryan religious doctrines about the ultimate nature of man". Cornish also suggests that Hitler's oratorical powers in addressing the group mind of crowds and Wittgenstein's philosophy of language and denial of mental privacy, are the practical and theoretical consequences of this doctrine.

See also Dreamcatcher in this journal.

Tuesday, October 2, 2012

Tradition!

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , — m759 @ 2:56 PM

“And how do we keep our balance?
That I can tell you in one word!”
Tevye in Fiddler on the Roof

“The object and characteristic of ‘traditions,’
including invented ones, is invariance.”
Eric Hobsbawm, introduction (link added)
to The Invention of Tradition

“Math is all about questions and answers.”
Prof. John D. McCarthy, Michigan State U.,
Monday afternoon, October 1, 2012

“Who knows where madness lies?”
Man of La Mancha
    (linked to here Monday morning)

Monday, October 1, 2012

Review

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 4:19 PM

"Self-evidently true and just"

The late Stephen Jay Gould
on a book by the late Barry Commoner.

Commoner reportedly died on Sunday.

Update of 5:42 PM ET—

Another academic death, this one from today—

» more

Wednesday, April 30, 2008

Wednesday April 30, 2008

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:30 AM

Lucy in the Sky
with Diamonds
and Sacred Heart

PARIS — Albert Hofmann, the mystical Swiss chemist who gave the world LSD, the most powerful psychotropic substance known, died Tuesday at his hilltop home near Basel, Switzerland. He was 102.

Related material:

Star and Diamond: A Tombstone for Plato

and
a film by Julie Taymor,
Across the Universe:

Across the Universe DVD

Detail of the
Strawberry Fields Forever
Sacred Heart:

Strawberry Fields Sacred Heart from 'Across the Universe'


A song:

Julie Taymor

Julie Taymor

Shinin’ like a diamond,
she had tombstones
in her eyes.

Album “The Dark,”
by Guy Clark

For related tombstones,
see May 16-19, 2006,
and April 19, 2008.

Further background:
Art Wars for
Red October.

Sunday, November 7, 2004

Sunday November 7, 2004

Filed under: General — m759 @ 5:55 PM
Big Fish

In honor of the reversion of Leningrad
to its former name, St. Petersburg,
and in honor of the late Howard Keel,
who died this morning:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix04B/041107-Keel3.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix04B/041107-Dallas2.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

SSN 700, The USS Dallas:

“USS Dallas is the 13th Los Angeles class
nuclear powered attack submarine.
The boat plays a very prominent part
in Tom Clancy’s Hunt for Red October.”

Saturday, November 1, 2003

Saturday November 1, 2003

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 1:05 PM

Symmetry in Diamond Theory:
Robbing Peter to Pay Paul

"Groups arise in most areas of pure and applied mathematics, usually as a set of operators or transformations of some structure. The appearance of a group generally reflects some kind of symmetry in the object under study, and such symmetry may be considered one of the fundamental notions of mathematics."

Peter Webb

"Counter-change is sometimes known as Robbing Peter to Pay Paul."

Helen Kelley Patchwork

Paul Robeson in
King Solomon's
Mines

Counterchange
symmetry

For a look at the Soviet approach
to counterchange symmetry, see

The Kishinev School of Discrete Geometry.

The larger cultural context:

See War of Ideas (Oct. 24),
The Hunt for Red October (Oct. 25),
On the Left (Oct. 25), and
ART WARS for Trotsky's Birthday (Oct. 26).
 

Saturday, October 25, 2003

Saturday October 25, 2003

Filed under: General — m759 @ 6:38 AM

Rummy, here’s your
“war of ideas”

The Hunt for Red October

Today is the anniversary of the triumph of Lenin in the October Revolution.

General background on the two sides:

News
    Politics
        Conservative
        Progressive and Left

In today’s news: March on Washington

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