Log24

Monday, February 23, 2015

Symbolic Poetry*

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 11:00 AM

“When life itself seems lunatic,
who knows where madness lies?

Man of La Mancha

Windmill of Time and Diamond of Eternity

Perhaps the late Sidney Lumet?

           The setting for the Sidney Lumet film "Deathtrap" (1982)

* Continued from yesterday's Backstory and Sermon.

Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Diabolically Complex

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:00 PM

The title is from a Log24 post, "Diabolically Complex Riddle," of Sept. 27, 2014.

(See also a search for "Diabolic"  in this journal, which yields an application to
"magic" squares.)

From 'The Lost Theorem,' by Lee Sallows

Friday, October 10, 2014

Both Hands and an Ass Map

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 12:00 AM

(Continued from Grids and Space and posts tagged Riddle for Caltech)

IMAGE- Scene from 'Deathtrap,' with subtitle

Tuesday, October 7, 2014

Grids and Space

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:00 PM

In honor of the late Sidney Lumet

(See Makom Kadosh , April 9, 2011.)

IMAGE- Christopher Reeve in the 1982 film 'Deathtrap,' illustrating concepts of space

Saturday, September 27, 2014

Sweet Sixteen

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:01 AM

Google celebrates its 16th birthday today.

Here are some family values found with its help.

The father-in-law of the late Thomas A. Tombrello
(previous post) was sociologist Robert K. Merton.
See a tribute to Merton by his daughter Stephanie,
Tombrello's widow. See also a Log24 post mentioning
Merton from Oct. 19, 2005. That post leads to a
post from the date of Merton's death, Feb. 23, 2003.

From that 2003 post:

“Her wall is filled with pictures,
She gets ‘em one by one.”

— “Sweet Little Sixteen,” by Chuck Berry
(Chess Records, January 1958)

Diabolically Complex Riddle

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 AM

Steve Chawkins in the Los Angeles Times
Friday, September 26, 2014, 12:09 PM LA time —

"Tom Tombrello, a Caltech physics professor for more than
50 years and an inspiration for freshmen who had to grapple
with diabolically complex riddles to enter his legendary class
on scientific thinking [Physics 11], has died. He was 78.

Tombrello collapsed Tuesday [Sept. 23, 2014] on a bus
between terminals at London's Heathrow airport, his wife,
Stephanie, said. The cause of his death has not yet been determined….

… Tombrello accepted only a handful of students for each year's
session of Physics 11."

How many students is a handful?

Related material from this journal on the day of the professor's death:

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