Log24

Sunday, October 2, 2016

Neville Marriner, 1924-2016

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 8:00 PM

The Washington Post  online today —

Neville Marriner, who led renowned
Academy of St. Martin in the Fields, dies at 92
.

Meanwhile …

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 7:00 PM

Some Old Philosophy from Rome

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 6:45 PM

See also Log24 posts from the above reported date of death —
posts now tagged Wittgenstein's Pentagram.

Sermon

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:00 AM

"I don't care about what anything was designed  to do,
 I care about what it can  do."

Ed Harris in "Apollo 13"

Westworld

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:45 AM

On a new HBO series that opens at 9 PM ET tonight —

Watching Westworld , you can sense a grand mythology unfolding before your eyes. The show’s biggest strength is its world-building, an aspect of screenwriting that many television series have botched before. Often shows will rush viewers into plot, forgetting to instill a sense of place and of history, that you’re watching something that doesn’t just exist in a vacuum but rather is part of some larger ecosystem. Not since Lost  can I remember a TV show so committed to immersing its audience into the physical space it inhabits. (Indeed, Westworld  can also be viewed as a meta commentary on the art of screenwriting itself: brainstorming narratives, building characters, all for the amusement of other people.)

Westworld  is especially impressive because it builds two worlds at once: the Western theme park and the futuristic workplace. The Western half of Westworld  might be the more purely entertaining of the two, with its shootouts and heists and chases through sublime desert vistas. Behind the scenes, the theme park’s workers show how the robot sausage is made. And as a dystopian office drama, the show does something truly original.

Adam Epstein at QUARTZ, October 1, 2016

"… committed to immersing its audience
  into the physical space it inhabits…."

See also, in this journal, the Mimsy Cube

"Mimsy Were the Borogoves,"
classic science fiction story:

"… he lifted a square, transparent crystal block, small enough to cup in his palm– much too small to contain the maze of apparatus within it. In a moment Scott had solved that problem. The crystal was a sort of magnifying glass, vastly enlarging the things inside the block. Strange things they were, too. Miniature people, for example– They moved. Like clockwork automatons, though much more smoothly. It was rather like watching a play."

A Crystal Block —

Cube, 4x4x4

Happy Birthday, Wallace Stevens

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 8:28 AM

Log24 in review — Logos and Logic,  Crystal and Dragon .

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