Log24

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Time and Chance

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 5:55 AM

(For Qohen Leth)

Monday, August 28, 2017

Narratives

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 3:00 PM

See Captain America's special  breakfast
in posts tagged Aesthetic Distance.

See as well Taylor Swift in the previous post and
The School of the New York Times on creating
great branded content:

Friday, July 28, 2017

Aesthetic Distance

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , — m759 @ 11:23 AM

In memory of a Disney "imagineer" who reportedly died yesterday.

From the opening scene  of a 2017 film, "Gifted":

Frank calls his niece Mary to breakfast on the morning she is 
to enter first grade. She is dressed, for the first time, for school —

- Hey! Come on. Let's move!
- No!
- Let me see.
- No.
- Come on, I made you special breakfast.
- You can't cook.
- Hey, Mary, open up. 
(She opens her door and walks out.)
- You look beautiful.
- I look like a Disney character.
  Where's the special?
- What?
- You said you made me special breakfast.

Read more: http://www.springfieldspringfield.co.uk/
movie_script.php?movie=gifted

Cube symmetry subgroup of order 8 from 'Geometry and Symmetry,' Paul B. Yale, 1968, p.21

Tuesday, December 7, 2010

The Tiffany Puzzle

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 5:00 AM

Suggested by Dan Brown's remarks in today's Science Times  special section on puzzles—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101202-DreidelAndStoneSm.jpg

For a fanciful linkage of the dreidel 's concept of chance
to The Stone 's concept of invariant law, note that the
New York Lottery evening number on Dec. 1 (the
beginning of Hanukkah) was 840. See also the number
840 in the final post (July 20, 2002) of a search for
Solomon's Cube.

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101207-FifthAve5AM.jpg

Friday, May 19, 2006

Friday May 19, 2006

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 4:07 PM
Women-Only
Meeting at Princeton

From May 15 through May 26, there is a women-only meeting on zeta functions at the  Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey.  Today’s activities:

8:00- 9:45 a.m. Breakfast (Dining Hall)
9:00- 9:30 a.m. T-shirt Sale, Harry’s Bar – Dining Hall
9:30-10:00 a.m. Depart for Princeton University (talks, lunch, campus and art museum tour, and dinner)

No movie?

From Log24, July 27, 2003:

“…my despair with words as instruments of communion is often near total.”

— Charles Small, Harvard ’64 25th Anniversary Report, 1989 (See 11/21/02).

Perhaps dinner and a movie?
The dinner — 
at Formaggio in Cuernavaca.
The movie —
Michael.

Lucero
(Bright Star),
portrayed by
Megan Follows

 

Hoc est enim
corpus meum…

See also
A Mass for Lucero.


Related material:

Women’s History Month–
Global and Local: One Small Step

Saturday, September 11, 2004

Saturday September 11, 2004

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 12:00 PM

September Morn

“Now is the time for turning. The leaves are beginning to turn from green to red to orange. The birds are beginning to turn and are heading once more toward the south. The animals are beginning to turn to storing their food for the winter. For leaves, birds and animals, turning comes instinctively. But for us, turning does not come so easily.”

President Clinton,
Prayer Breakfast,
September 11, 1998

Tuesday, June 22, 2004

Tuesday June 22, 2004

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 9:00 AM

Dirty Trick

Some quotations in memory of philosopher Stuart Hampshire, who died on June 13, 2004.

From the Hampshire obituary in The Guardian:

I

He frequently told the story of how, towards the end of the war, he had to interrogate a French traitor (imprisoned by the Free French), who refused to cooperate unless he was allowed to live. Should Hampshire, knowing the man was condemned to die, promise him a reprieve, which he was in no position to give, or truthfully refuse it, thereby jeopardising the lives of Resistance fighters?

“If you’re in a war,” said Hampshire, “you can’t start thinking, ‘Well I can’t lie to a man who’s going to be shot tomorrow and tell him that he isn’t.’ ”

But what the whole anecdote, and its incessant retelling, revealed was that Hampshire had, in fact, thought precisely what he said was unthinkable, and that whichever of the two decisions he finally took lay heavy on his conscience ever afterwards. Indicatively, too, it was especially loathsome to him because, although he did not say this in so many words, the traitor was almost a mirror image of himself – a cultivated young intellectual, looking like a film star, much influenced by elegant literary stylists – except that, in the traitor’s case, his literary mentors were fascist.

II

It is hard to know how Hampshire’s academic career was vitiated by the scandal over his affair with Ayer’s wife Renee, whom he married in 1961 after a divorce in which he was named as co-respondent. Even if less a matter of the dons’ moral conviction than their concern over how All Souls would appear, the affair caused a massive furore….

From a log24 entry on the day before Hampshire’s death:

I

“Hemingway called it a dirty trick.  It might even be an ancient Ordeal laid down on us by an evil Inquisitor in Space…. the dirty Ordeal by Death….”

— Jack Kerouac in Desolation Angels

II

The New Yorker of June 14  & 21, 2004:

…in ‘The Devil’s Eye,’ Bergman’s little-known comedy of 1960. Pablo seduces the wife of a minister, and then, sorrowful and sated, falling to his knees, he addresses her thus:

‘First, I’ll finish off that half-dug vegetable patch I saw. Then I’ll sit and let the rain fall on me. I shall feel wonderfully cool. And I’ll breakfast on one of those sour apples down by the gate. After that, I shall go back to Hell.’ “

Whether Hampshire is now in Hell, the reader may surmise.  Some evidence in Hampshire’s  favor:

His review of On Beauty and Being Just, by Elaine Scarry, in The New York Review of Books of November 18, 1999.  Note particularly his remarks on Fred Astaire, and the links to Astaire and the Four Last Things in an earlier entry of June 12, which was, as noted above, the day before Hampshire’s death.

As for the day of death itself, consider the  following  remark with which Hampshire concludes his review of Scarry’s  book:

“But one must occasionally fly the flag, and the flag, incorrigibly, is beauty.”

In this connection, see the entry of the Sunday Hampshire died, Spider Web, as well as entries on the harrowing of hell — Holy Saturday, 2004 — and on beauty —  Art Wars for Trotsky’s Birthday and A Mass for Lucero (written, as it happens, on June 13, 2002).

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