Log24

Tuesday, February 6, 2018

For Times Square Church*

Filed under: General — m759 @ 1:01 AM

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10A/100506-Hcube_fold.gif

Image--Chess game from 'The 
Seventh Seal'

The metaphor for metamorphosis no keys unlock.
— Steven H. Cullinane, "Endgame"

* See Times Square Church in this journal and
   the posts of July 2010.  Related material:

   A Monday night death —

Wednesday, December 20, 2017

Departed

Filed under: General — m759 @ 1:28 AM

(Tuesday, Boston time; early Wednesday, Rome time.)

"The metaphor for metamorphosis no keys unlock."

Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Middle March:

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:02 PM

The Key to All Mythologies  in a Cartoon Graveyard

This is a sequel to yesterday's post Review, which
suggested a look at Lévi-Strauss's The Raw and The Cooked  
in Derrida's “Structure, Sign, and Play," and then a look at the

Financial Times  of February 26, 2010

"The metaphor for metamorphosis no keys unlock."

Steven H. Cullinane, November 7, 1986

Friday, October 4, 2013

For the Feast of St. Francis

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 1:06 PM

"According to Vladimir Nabokov, Salvador Dalí
 was 'really Norman Rockwell’s  twin brother
 kidnapped by gypsies in babyhood.'
 But actually there were triplets: the third one is
 Stephen King."

 — Margaret Atwood, "Shine On,"  
      online Sept. 19, 2013

"The metaphor for metamorphosis
  no keys unlock."

 — Steven H. Cullinane, Nov. 7, 1986

Saturday, August 20, 2011

Castle Rock

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 6:29 PM

Happy birthday to Amy Adams
(actress from Castle Rock, Colorado)

"The metaphor for metamorphosis…" —Endgame

Related material:

"The idea that reality consists of multiple 'levels,' each mirroring all others in some fashion, is a diagnostic feature of premodern cosmologies in general…."

Scholarly paper on "Correlative Cosmologies"

"How many layers are there to human thought? Sometimes in art, just as in people’s conversations, we’re aware of only one at a time. On other occasions, though, we realize just how many layers can be in simultaneous action, and we’re given a sense of both revelation and mystery. When a choreographer responds to music— when one artist reacts in detail to another— the sensation of multilayering can affect us as an insight not just into dance but into the regions of the mind.

The triple bill by the Mark Morris Dance Group at the Rose Theater, presented on Thursday night as part of the Mostly Mozart Festival, moves from simple to complex, and from plain entertainment to an astonishingly beautiful and intricate demonstration of genius….

'Socrates' (2010), which closed the program, is a calm and objective work that has no special dance excitement and whips up no vehement audience reaction. Its beauty, however, is extraordinary. It’s possible to trace in it terms of arithmetic, geometry, dualism, epistemology and ontology, and it acts as a demonstration of art and as a reflection of life, philosophy and death."

— Alastair Macaulay in today's New York Times

SOCRATES: Let us turn off the road a little….

Libretto for Mark Morris's 'Socrates'

See also Amy Adams's new film "On the Road"
in a story from Aug. 5, 2010 as well as a different story,
Eightgate, from that same date:

A 2x4 array of squares

The above reference to "metamorphosis" may be seen,
if one likes, as a reference to the group of all projectivities
and correlations in the finite projective space PG(3,2)—
a group isomorphic to the 40,320 transformations of S8
acting on the above eight-part figure.

See also The Moore Correspondence from last year
on today's date, August 20.

For some background, see a book by Peter J. Cameron,
who has figured in several recent Log24 posts—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11B/110820-Parallelisms60.jpg

"At the still point, there the dance is."
               — Four Quartets

Thursday, July 8, 2010

Toronto vs. Rome

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 9:00 PM

or: Catullus vs. Ovid

(Today's previous post, "Coxeter vs. Fano,"
might also have been titled "Toronto vs. Rome.")

ut te postremo donarem munere mortis

Catullus 101

Explicatio

Unfolding

Image by Christopher Thomas at Wikipedia
Unfolding of a hypercube and of a cube —

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10A/100506-Hcube_fold.gif

Image--Chess game from 'The 
Seventh Seal'

The metaphor for metamorphosis no keys unlock.
— Steven H. Cullinane, "Endgame"

The current New Yorker  has a translation of
  the above line of Catullus by poet Anne Carson.
According to poets.org, Carson "attended St. Michael's College
at the University of Toronto and, despite leaving twice,
received her B.A. in 1974, her M.A. in 1975 and her Ph.D. in 1981."

Carson's translation is given in a review of her new book Nox.

The title, "The Unfolding," of the current review echoes an earlier
New Yorker  piece on another poet, Madeleine L'Engle—

Cynthia Zarin in The New Yorker, issue dated April 12, 2004–

“Time, for L’Engle, is accordion-pleated. She elaborated,
‘When you bring a sheet off the line, you can’t handle it
until it’s folded, and in a sense, I think, the universe can’t
exist until it’s folded– or it’s a story without a book.’”

(See also the "harrow up" + Hamlet  link in yesterday's 6:29 AM post.)

Powered by WordPress