Log24

Wednesday, May 9, 2018

On April 2, 2005 . . .

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:19 AM

Nostalgie de la Boue

 "Odd-numbered (recto) pages
read from the gutter (inside margin)
towards the fore-edge;
even-numbered (verso) pages
read towards the gutter."

— From The Golden Compasses 
     "Appendix 8: Impositions and
     Folding Schemes" (page 526).

For Wrinkle in Time  fans —

Enthusiasts of la boue  may consult Log24 posts about the above date.

From a Log24 post of April 2, 2005

Sunday, August 7, 2016

The Lauper Sermon

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:00 AM

"Confusion is nothing new." 
 

Illustrations —

http://www.log24.com/log/pix08/080525-Alethiometer.jpg

Alethiometer from "The Golden Compass"

Monday, October 20, 2014

The Library

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 PM

The online Harvard Crimson  today:

“ ‘I don’t like how they check your bags
when you leave the library
even though you have to swipe your
student ID to get in.’

But what else would I be carrying in this
Gutenberg Bible-sized backpack? ”

Nicole Kidman at the end of “Hemingway & Gellhorn” (2012)

Perhaps the I Ching ?

Sunday, May 25, 2008

Sunday May 25, 2008

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 8:28 AM
"Caught up 
    in circles…"

— Song lyric,  
Cyndi Lauper

http://www.log24.com/log/pix08/080525-Alethiometer.jpg

Alethiometer from
"The Golden Compass"

 

The 64 hexagrams of the I Ching in a circular arrangement suggested by a Singer 63-cycle

The I Ching
as Alethiometer

Update:

See also this morning's
later entry, illustrating
the next line of Cyndi
Lauper's classic lyric
"Time After Time" —

"… Confusion is    
  nothing new."

Friday, December 14, 2007

Friday December 14, 2007

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:00 AM
“Well, it changes.”

Nicole Kidman at a press conference
for the London premiere of
“The Golden Compass” on November 27:

Nicole Kidman'-- kittens and tiger

A related Log24 link from
that same date, November 27:

Deep Beauty

See also Zen and the Art of
Motorcycle Maintenance

“Plato hadn’t tried to destroy areté. He had encapsulated it; made a permanent, fixed Idea out of it; had converted it to a rigid, immobile Immortal Truth. He made areté the Good, the highest form, the highest Idea of all. It was subordinate only to Truth itself, in a synthesis of all that had gone before.That was why the Quality that Phaedrus had arrived at in the classroom had seemed so close to Plato’s Good. Plato’s Good was taken from the rhetoricians. Phaedrus searched, but could find no previous cosmologists who had talked about the Good. That was from the Sophists. The difference was that Plato’s Good was a fixed and eternal and unmoving Idea, whereas for the rhetoricians it was not an Idea at all. The Good was not a form of reality. It was reality itself, ever changing, ultimately unknowable in any kind of fixed, rigid way.”

— as well as Cold Mountain 

Page 48: “It’s claimed that if
you take a mirror and look
backwards into a well, you’ll
see your future down in the water.”

“So in short order Ada found herself bent backward over the mossy well lip, canted in a pose with little to recommend it in the way of dignity or comfort, back arched, hips forward, legs spraddled for balance.  She held a hand mirror above her face, angled to catch the surface of the water below.

Ada had agreed to the well-viewing as a variety of experiment in local custom and as a tonic for her gloom. Her thoughts had been broody and morbid and excessively retrospective for so long that she welcomed the chance to run counter to that flow, to cast forward and think about the future, even though she expected to see nothing but water at the bottom of the well.

She shifted her feet to find better grip on the packed dirt of the yard and then tried to look into the mirror.  The white sky above was skimmed over with backlit haze, bright as a pearl or as a silver mirror itself.  The dark foliage of oaks all around the edges framed the sky, duplicating the wooden frame of the mirror into which Ada peered, examining its picture of the well depths behind her to see what might lie ahead in her life. The bright round of well water at the end of the black shaft was another mirror.  It cast back the shine of sky and was furred around the edges here and there with sprigs of fern growing between stones.

Ada tried to focus her attention on the hand mirror, but the bright sky beyond kept drawing her eye away.  She was dazzled by light and shade, by the confusing duplication of reflections and of frames. All coming from too many directions for the mind to take account of. The various images bounced against each other until she felt a desperate vertigo, as if she could at any moment pitch backward and plunge head first down the well shaft and drown there, the sky far above her, her last vision but a bright circle set in the dark, no bigger than a full moon.

Her head spun and she reached with her free hand and held to the stonework of the well.  And then just for a moment things steadied, and there indeed seemed to be a picture in the mirror.”

— and Log24 on December 3 —

I Ching Hexagram 48: The Well
The above Chinese character
stands for Hexagram 48, “The Well.”
For further details, click on the well.

Wednesday, December 12, 2007

Wednesday December 12, 2007

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:00 AM
Found in Translation:
Words and Images

NY Times obituaries, Dec. 12, 2007: Whitney and Mailer

From today’s New York Times:

“Thomas P. Whitney, a former diplomat and writer on Russian affairs who was best known for translating the work of the dissident writer Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn into English, died on [Sunday] Dec. 2 in Manhattan. He was 90….

During World War II, he was an analyst in Washington with the Office of Strategic Services, a forerunner of the Central Intelligence Agency….

In the late 1960s and afterward, he bred thoroughbred horses….

On one occasion, Mr. Whitney took Mr. Solzhenitsyn to Saratoga Racetrack….”

Margalit Fox

Related material:

Words

Adam Gopnik on C. S. Lewis
in The New Yorker, issue
dated Nov. 21, 2005:

Prisoner of Narnia

“Lewis began with
a number of haunted images….”

“The best of the books are the ones…
where the allegory is at a minimum
and the images just flow.”

“‘Everything began with images,’
Lewis wrote….”


Images

Yesterday’s entry on
Solzhenitsyn and The Golden Compass
and the following illustrations…

from Sunday in the Park with Death,
a Log24 entry commemorating
Trotsky’s birthday–

By Diego Rivera: Frida Kahlo holding yin-yang symbol

–and from Log24 on the date
of Whitney’s death,
Sunday, Dec. 2, 2007

Dark and light horses, personal emblem of Harry Stack Sullivan

Personal Emblem
of psychiatrist
Harry Stack Sullivan

The horses may refer to
 the Phaedrus of Plato.

See also Art Wars.

Tuesday, December 11, 2007

Tuesday December 11, 2007

Filed under: General — m759 @ 8:00 AM
The Solzhenitsyn Compass

The Golden Compass is a $180 million movie that opens this weekend….

In the book, the golden compass is actually called ‘the alethiometer.’ As any student of Greek would expect, this instrument has to do with alethia— the truth. In the fourth chapter of the book, the Master of Jordan College tells Lyra, the protagonist of the story, that the alethiometer ‘tells you the truth. As for how to read it, you’ll have to learn by yourself.'”

Sermon by Paul Lundberg, Holy Cross Greek Orthodox Seminary, Tuesday, December 4, 2007.

“Harvard’s motto is Veritas. Many of you have already found out, and others will find out in the course of their lives, that truth eludes us as soon as our concentration begins to flag, all the while leaving the illusion that we are continuing to pursue it. This is the source of much discord. Also, truth seldom is sweet; it is almost invariably bitter.”

Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, commencement address, Harvard University, June 8, 1978

Solzhenitsyn is 89 today.
Happy birthday.

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