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Saturday, November 3, 2018

The Space Theory of Truth

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:00 PM

Earlier posts have discussed the "story theory of truth"
versus the "diamond theory of truth," as defined by 
Richard Trudeau in his 1987 book The Non-Euclidean Revolution.

In a New York Times  opinion piece for tomorrow's print edition,*
novelist Dara Horn touched on what might be called 
"the space theory of truth."

When they return to synagogue, mourners will be greeted
with more ancient words: “May God comfort you
among the mourners of Zion and Jerusalem.”
In that verse, the word used for God is hamakom 
literally, “the place.” May the place comfort you.

[Link added.]

The Source —

See Dara Horn in this  journal, as well as Makom.

* "A version of this article appears in print on ,
on Page A23 of the New York edition with the headline: 
American Jews Know This Story."

Friday, September 30, 2016

Desmic Midrash

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:19 AM

The author of the review in the previous post, Dara Horn, supplies
below a midrash on "desmic," a term derived from the Greek desme 
δεσμή , bundle, sheaf, or, in the mathematical sense, pencil —
French faisceau ), which is apparently related to the term desmos , bond 

(The term "desmic," as noted earlier, is relevant to the structure of
Heidegger's Sternwürfel .)

The Horn midrash —

(The "medieval philosopher" here is not the remembered pre-Christian
Ben Sirah (Ecclesiasticus ) but the philosopher being read — Maimonides:  
Guide for the Perplexed , 3:51.)

Here of course "that bond" may be interpreted as corresponding to the
Greek desmos  above, thus also to the desmic  structure of the
stellated octahedron, a sort of three-dimensional Star of David.

See "desmic" in this journal.

“Profound archaeological wells”

Filed under: General — m759 @ 8:30 AM

From a review by Dara Horn of

Critics, Monsters, Fanatics, & Other Literary Essays
by Cynthia Ozick
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 224 pp., $25

" the credo that has emerged throughout her career:
against idolatry, yes, but also in favor of the particular,
context, rootedness, the profound archaeological wells
from which no writer can be removed without removing
his or her greatest powers.

For Ozick herself, that archaeological well is not only Anglo-
American literature, but the far deeper well of Judaism." 

— "Cynthia Ozick:  Or, Immortality,"
Jewish Review of Books , Fall 2016

See also Michener's The Source  in this journal.

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