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Friday, December 3, 2004

Friday December 3, 2004

Filed under: General — m759 @ 2:56 PM

Crimson
on St. Cecilia’s Day

“… from the Age that is past,
To the Age that is waiting before.”
— Samuel Gilman, “Fair Harvard

Published by The Harvard Crimson
on Monday, November 22, 2004:

Dylan Performs
for Sold-Out Crowd

By KATHERINE CHAN
Harvard Crimson Contributing Writer

Shouts of “Make way! Moses is here!” filled a restless crowd as legendary musician Bob Dylan closed off his College tour last night jamming in front of a sold out audience of Harvard undergraduates and Cambridge residents….

The turnout for last night’s two-hour show was greater than many of the student audience members anticipated…

But despite the legendary hits and massive crowds, several students said they were disappointed with the show.

“I love Bob Dylan. I just don’t know what he’s saying,” said Alexander A.C. De Carvalho ’08.

Recommended reading
for Harvard students:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix04B/041203-Lyrics.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Click on picture
for details.

From an entry of October 29, 2004:

“Each epoch has its singer.”
Jack London, Oakland, California, 1901

“Anything but the void. And so we keep hoping to luck into a winning combination, to tap into a subtle harmony, trying like lock pickers to negotiate a compromise with the ‘mystery tramp,’ as Bob Dylan put it….”
— Dennis Overbye, Quantum Baseball,
    New York Times, Oct.  26, 2004

“You said you’d never compromise
With the mystery tramp,
    but now you realize
He’s not selling any alibis
As you stare into
    the vacuum of his eyes
And ask him do you want to
    make a deal?”
— Bob Dylan, Like a Rolling Stone

From The New York Times today:

“It’s official, I guess. Forty years after he recorded it, Bob Dylan’s ‘Like a Rolling Stone’ was just named the greatest rock ‘n’ roll song of all time….”

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