Log24

Sunday, March 17, 2019

Another Lying Rhyme…

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:29 PM

For Tom Stoppard, author of "Jumpers"

"Seven is Heaven


          From a webpage of Bill Cherowitzo

" … the Fano plane ,
a set of seven points
grouped into seven lines
that has been called
'the combinatorialist’s coat of arms.' "

— Blake Stacey in a March 14 post 

Tuesday, August 7, 2018

Seventh

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:00 AM

 A Requiem Chord

Tom StoppardJumpers —

Heaven, how can I believe in Heaven?” 
she sings at the finale.

“Just a lying rhyme for seven!”

Perhaps.

http://www.log24.com/log/pix18/180807-Gage_Averill-Four_Parts-p-164.gif

Thursday, December 8, 2016

Space News

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 4:56 PM

"Bad news on the doorstep…." — American Pie


Update of 5:24 PM ET — A requiem chord

Tom StoppardJumpers —

Heaven, how can I believe in Heaven?” 
she sings at the finale.

“Just a lying rhyme for seven!”

Perhaps.

Sunday, July 19, 2015

Lying Rhyme

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 6:45 PM
 

Tom StoppardJumpers —

Heaven, how can I believe in Heaven?” 
she sings at the finale.
“Just a lying rhyme for seven!”

“To begin at the beginning: Is God?…”
[very long pause]

Leave a space.”

See as well a search for "Heaven.gif" in this journal.

For the more literate among us —

     … and the modulation from algebra to space.

Saturday, September 20, 2014

Seven*

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:01 PM

Google News at 7:

* The title refers to Tom Stoppard’s “lying rhyme” .

Monday, April 7, 2008

Monday April 7, 2008

Filed under: General — m759 @ 1:00 PM
“LegacyPlus™:
 
The Class,
 Without the Classes”

The New York Times
on the date of
Charlton Heston’s death

Leave a space.”
 — Tom Stoppard      
in “Jumpers

NY Times obituaries April 7, 2008: Charlton Heston, Helen Yglesias, George Switzer

Heaven is a state, a sort of
   metaphysical state.”
— John O’Hara,
Hope of Heaven

Tuesday, February 26, 2008

Tuesday February 26, 2008

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 8:00 PM

Eight is a Gate (continued)

Tom Stoppard, Jumpers:
"Heaven, how can I believe in Heaven?" she sings at the finale. "Just a lying rhyme for seven!"
"To begin at the beginning: Is God?…" [very long pause]

 
From "Space," by Salomon Bochner

Makom. Our term “space” derives from the Latin, and is thus relatively late. The nearest to it among earlier terms in the West are the Hebrew makom and the Greek topos (τόπος). The literal meaning of these two terms is the same, namely “place,” and even the scope of connotations is virtually the same (Theol. Wörterbuch…, 1966). Either term denotes: area, region, province; the room occupied by a person or an object, or by a community of persons or arrangements of objects. But by first occurrences in extant sources, makom seems to be the earlier term and concept. Apparently, topos is attested for the first time in the early fifth century B.C., in plays of Aeschylus and fragments of Parmenides, and its meaning there is a rather literal one, even in Parmenides. Now, the Hebrew book Job is more or less contemporary with these Greek sources, but in chapter 16:18 occurs in a rather figurative sense:

O earth, cover not thou my blood, and let my cry have no place (makom).

Late antiquity was already debating whether this makom is meant to be a “hiding place” or a “resting place” (Dhorme, p. 217), and there have even been suggestions that it might have the logical meaning of “occasion,” “opportunity.” Long before it appears in Job, makom occurs in the very first chapter of Genesis, in:

And God said, Let the waters under the heaven be gathered together unto one place (makom) and the dry land appear, and it was so (Genesis 1:9).

This biblical account is more or less contemporary with Hesiod's Theogony, but the makom of the biblical account has a cosmological nuance as no corresponding term in Hesiod. Elsewhere in Genesis (for instance, 22:3; 28:11; 28:19), makom usually refers to a place of cultic significance, where God might be worshipped, eventually if not immediately. Similarly, in the Arabic language, which however has been a written one only since the seventh century A.D., the term makām designates the place of a saint or of a holy tomb (Jammer, p. 27). In post-biblical Hebrew and Aramaic, in the first centuries A.D., makom became a theological synonym for God, as expressed in the Talmudic sayings: “He is the place of His world,” and “His world is His place” (Jammer, p. 26). Pagan Hellenism of the same era did not identify God with place, not noticeably so; except that the One (τὸ ἕν) of Plotinus (third century A.D.) was conceived as something very comprehensive (see for instance J. M. Rist, pp. 21-27) and thus may have been intended to subsume God and place, among other concepts. In the much older One of Parmenides (early fifth century B.C.), from which the Plotinian One ultimately descended, the theological aspect was only faintly discernible. But the spatial aspect was clearly visible, even emphasized (Diels, frag. 8, lines 42-49).

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Paul Dhorme, Le livre de Job (Paris, 1926).

H. Diels and W. Kranz, Die Fragmente der Vorsokratiker, 6th ed. (Berlin, 1938).

Max Jammer, Concepts of Space (Cambridge, Mass., 1954).

J. M. Rist, Plotinus: The Road to Reality (Cambridge, 1967).

Theologisches Wörterbuch zum Neuen Testament (1966), 8, 187-208, esp. 199ff.

— SALOMON BOCHNER

Related material: In the previous entry — "Father Clark seizes at one place (page eight)
upon the fact that…."

Father Clark's reviewer (previous entry) called a remark by Father Clark "far fetched."
This use of "place" by the reviewer is, one might say, "near fetched."

Saturday, July 7, 2007

Saturday July 7, 2007

Filed under: General — m759 @ 1:48 AM
Seven is Heaven


John Lahr, review
of a production of Tom Stoppard’s “Jumpers”–

The play is about a philosophy professor, George, and his wife, Dotty, who “exudes a sumptuous sexuality…. She has a pert round head, high cheekbones, and a deep voice, which, like her acting, is full of playfulness and longing. George is lost in thought; Dotty is just lost. ‘Heaven, how can I believe in Heaven?’ she sings at the finale. ‘Just a lying rhyme for seven!’ She is promise and heartbreak in one.”

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix07/070707-Obits.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

“With a name like Frigo…”

Related material:

Eight is a Gate

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