Log24

Monday, January 20, 2014

Chinese Oracle

Filed under: General — m759 @ 8:30 PM

For Time Cube  fans —

The Conductor and the Cube

Japanese Oracle

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:57 AM

Review —

From a Jan. 20, 2011, Emory University press release —
"Finite formula found for partition numbers" —

"We found a function, that we call P, that is like
a magical oracle," Ono says. "I can take any number,
plug it into P, and instantly calculate the partitions
of that number. P does not return gruesome numbers
with infinitely many decimal places. It's the finite,
algebraic formula that we have all been looking for."

Some may prefer Chinese  oracles.

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

Museum Quality

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:00 AM

For Marissa, continued from Jan. 13

"Killer App" —

By David Barboza in today's print NY Times.
Stephanie Yifan Yang contributed research.

A version of this article appears in print on January 21, 2014,
on page B1 of the New York edition with the headline:
A Popular Chinese Social Networking App Blazes Its Own Path.

Another path —

See also Chinese Oracle.

Tuesday, September 26, 2006

Tuesday September 26, 2006

Filed under: General — m759 @ 8:48 AM
Today’s Birthdays:
T. S. Eliot and Linda Hamilton

From Eliot’s
Ash Wednesday“–

“Prophesy to the wind,
    to the wind only for only
The wind will listen.
    And the bones sang chirping
With the burden of the grasshopper,
    saying….”         

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06A/060926-Eliot.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

From The Man in the High Castle:

“Juliana said, ‘Oracle, why did you write The Grasshopper Lies Heavy? What are we supposed to learn?’

‘You have a disconcertingly superstitious way of phrasing your question,’ Hawthorne said. But he had squatted down to witness the coin throwing. ‘Go ahead,’ he said; he handed her three Chinese brass coins with holes in the center. ‘I generally use these.’

She began throwing the coins; she felt calm and very much herself. Hawthorne wrote down her lines for her. When she had thrown the coins six times, he gazed down and said:

‘Sun at the top. Tui at the bottom. Empty in the center.’

‘Do you know what hexagram that is?’ she said. ‘Without using the chart?’

‘Yes,’ Hawthorne said.

‘It’s Chung Fu,’ Juliana said. ‘Inner Truth. I know without using the chart, too. And I know what it means.'”

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06A/060926-Lady.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Our Lady of
Judgment Day

“One of the illusions is that the present hour is not the critical, decisive hour. Write it on your heart that every day is the best day in the year. No man has learned anything rightly until he knows that every day is Doomsday.”

Emerson, Ch. VII, “Works and Days,” in The Complete Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson, Vol. VII, Society and Solitude (1870)

Monday, September 20, 2004

Monday September 20, 2004

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Pi continued:

(see 9/15/04)

Above:

Renegade mathematician Max Cohen (Sean Gullette, left) and the leader of the Kabbalah sect, Lenny Meyer (Ben Shenkman) have a chance encounter on a Chinatown street corner.

The Magic Schmuck

"Confucius is said to have received only one inappropriate answer, i.e., hexagram 22, GRACE — a thoroughly aesthetic hexagram. This is reminiscent of the advice given to Socrates by his daemon — 'You ought to make more music' — whereupon Socrates took to playing the flute. Confucius and Socrates compete for first place as far as reasonableness and a pedagogic attitude to life are concerned; but it is unlikely that either of them occupied himself with 'lending grace to the beard on his chin,' as the second line of this hexagram advises. Unfortunately, reason and pedagogy often lack charm and grace, and so the oracle may not have been wrong after all."

— Carl Jung, Foreword to the I Ching 

Yesterday, class, in keeping with our morning German lesson, our evening (5:01:22 PM ET) entry was Hexagram 22, Pi (pronounced "bee"). The Chinese term pi may be translated in various ways… As ornament, as adornment, or as in a German web page:

I-Ching 22 Pi Der Schmuck

The Wilhelm translation of pi is "grace."  This suggests we examine yesterday's evening lottery number in the State of Grace, Pennsylvania:

408.

As kabbalists know, there are many ways of interpreting numbers.  In keeping with the viewpoint of Ecclesiastes — "time and chance happeneth" — let us interpret this instance of chance as an instance of time… namely, 4/08.  Striving for consistency in our meditations, let us examine the lessons for…

4/08 2003 — Death's Dream Kingdom

and 4/08 2004 — Triple Crown

From the former:

"When smashing monuments, save the pedestals; they always come in handy."

Stanislaw J. Lec

From the latter: 

"The tug of an art that unapologetically sees itself as on a par with science and religion is not to be underestimated…. Philosophical ambition and formal modesty still constitute Minimalism's bottom line."

Michael Kimmelman

In keeping with the above, from
this year's Log24.net
Rosh Hashanah service

A Minimalist
Pedestal:

 

For a poetic interpretation
of this symbol, see
Hexagram 20,
Contemplation (View).

Sunday, June 6, 2004

Sunday June 6, 2004

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 1:29 PM
From
The Man in
the High Castle

by Philip K. Dick

Juliana said, “Oracle, why did you write The Grasshopper Lies Heavy? What are we supposed to learn?”

“You have a disconcertingly superstitious way of phrasing your question,” Hawthorne said. But he had squatted down to witness the coin throwing. “Go ahead,” he said; he handed her three Chinese brass coins with holes in the center. “I generally use these.”

She began throwing the coins; she felt calm and very much herself. Hawthorne wrote down her lines for her. When she had thrown the coins six times, he gazed down and said:

“Sun at the top. Tui at the bottom. Empty in the center.”

“Do you know what hexagram that is?” she said. “Without using the chart?”

“Yes,” Hawthorne said.

“It’s Chung Fu,” Juliana said. “Inner Truth. I know without using the chart, too. And I know what it means.”

From
The Book of
Ecclesiastes

12:5 … and the almond tree shall flourish, and the grasshopper shall be a burden, and desire shall fail: because man goeth to his long home, and the mourners go about the streets

 

Saturday, November 15, 2003

Saturday November 15, 2003

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Aes Triplex

The title, from a Robert Louis Stevenson essay, means “triple brass” (or triple bronze):

From the admirable site of J. Nathan Matias:

Aes Triplex means Triple Bronze, from a line in Horace’s Odes that reads ‘Oak and triple bronze encompassed the breast of him who first entrusted his frail craft to the wild sea.’ ”

From Philip K. Dick’s The Man in the High Castle:

Juliana said, “Oracle, why did you write The Grasshopper Lies Heavy? What are we supposed to learn?”

“You have a disconcertingly superstitious way of phrasing your question,” Hawthorne said. But he had squatted down to witness the coin throwing. “Go ahead,” he said; he handed her three Chinese brass coins with holes in the center. “I generally use these.”

This passage, included in my earlier entry of Friday, combined with the opening of yet another major motion picture starring Russell Crowe, suggests three readings for that young man, who is perhaps the true successor to Marlon Brando.

Oracle, for Crowe as John Nash (A Beautiful Mind):

Understanding the I Ching

Mutiny, for Crowe as Jack Aubrey (Master and Commander):

Bartleby, the Scrivener

Storm, for Crowe as Maximus (Gladiator):

Pharsalia, Book V:
The Oracle, the Mutiny, the Storm

As background listening, one possibility is Sinatra’s classic “Three Coins”:

“Three hearts in the fountain,
Each heart longing for its home.
There they lie in the fountain
Somewhere in the heart of Rome.*” 

Personally, though, I prefer, as a tribute to author Joan Didion (who also wrote of coins and the Book of Transformations), the even more classic Sinatra ballad

Angel Eyes.”

 * Horace leads to “Acroceraunian shoals,” which leads to Palaeste, which leads to Pharsalia and to the heart of Rome.  (With a nod to my high school Latin teacher, the late great John Stachowiak.)

Friday, November 14, 2003

Friday November 14, 2003

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:56 AM

Philip K. Dick Meets Joan Didion

From the ending of
The Man in the High Castle:

Juliana said, “I wonder why the oracle would write a novel. Did you ever think of asking it that?” ….

“You may say the question aloud,” Hawthorne said. “We have no secrets here.”

Juliana said, “Oracle, why did you write The Grasshopper Lies Heavy? What are we supposed to learn?”

“You have a disconcertingly superstitious way of phrasing your question,” Hawthorne said. But he had squatted down to witness the coin throwing. “Go ahead,” he said; he handed her three Chinese brass coins with holes in the center. “I generally use these.”

She began throwing the coins; she felt calm and very much herself. Hawthorne wrote down her lines for her. When she had thrown the coins six times, he gazed down and said:

“Sun at the top. Tui at the bottom. Empty in the center.”

IMAGE- Hexagram 61

“Do you know what hexagram that is?” she said. “Without using the chart?”

“Yes,” Hawthorne said.

“It’s Chung Fu,” Juliana said. “Inner Truth. I know without using the chart, too. And I know what it means.”

From the ending of
Play It As It Lays:

I lie here in the sunlight, watch the hummingbird.  This morning I threw the coins in the swimming pool, and they gleamed and turned in the water in such a way that I was almost moved to read them.  I refrained.

One thing in my defense, not that it matters.  I know something Carter never knew, or Helene, or maybe you.  I know what “nothing” means, and keep on playing.

Why, BZ would say.

Why not, I say.

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