Log24

Friday, May 10, 2019

Walpurgisnacht Riddle

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:04 PM

From a search for Absolut Riddle in this  journal —

Saturday, September 27, 2014

Diabolically Complex Riddle

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 AM

Steve Chawkins in the Los Angeles Times
Friday, September 26, 2014, 12:09 PM LA time —

"Tom Tombrello, a Caltech physics professor for more than
50 years and an inspiration for freshmen who had to grapple
with diabolically complex riddles to enter his legendary class
on scientific thinking [Physics 11], has died. He was 78.

Tombrello collapsed Tuesday [Sept. 23, 2014] on a bus
between terminals at London's Heathrow airport, his wife,
Stephanie, said. The cause of his death has not yet been determined….

… Tombrello accepted only a handful of students for each year's
session of Physics 11."

How many students is a handful?

Related material from this journal on the day of the professor's death:

Thursday, January 23, 2014

Riddled

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 5:01 PM

From this journal on Dec. 20, 2003 ("White, Geometric, and Eternal") —

Riddled:

The Absolutist Faith
of The New York Times

See also Dead Poets'  Word and  A Riddle for Davos, as well as

Monday, February 23, 2015

Symbolic Poetry*

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 11:00 AM

“When life itself seems lunatic,
who knows where madness lies?

Man of La Mancha

Windmill of Time and Diamond of Eternity

Perhaps the late Sidney Lumet?

           The setting for the Sidney Lumet film "Deathtrap" (1982)

* Continued from yesterday's Backstory and Sermon.

Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Diabolically Complex

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:00 PM

The title is from a Log24 post, "Diabolically Complex Riddle," of Sept. 27, 2014.

(See also a search for "Diabolic"  in this journal, which yields an application to
"magic" squares.)

From 'The Lost Theorem,' by Lee Sallows

Friday, October 10, 2014

Both Hands and an Ass Map

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 12:00 AM

(Continued from Grids and Space and posts tagged Riddle for Caltech)

IMAGE- Scene from 'Deathtrap,' with subtitle

Tuesday, October 7, 2014

Grids and Space

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:00 PM

In honor of the late Sidney Lumet

(See Makom Kadosh , April 9, 2011.)

IMAGE- Christopher Reeve in the 1982 film 'Deathtrap,' illustrating concepts of space

Saturday, September 27, 2014

Sweet Sixteen

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:01 AM

Google celebrates its 16th birthday today.

Here are some family values found with its help.

The father-in-law of the late Thomas A. Tombrello
(previous post) was sociologist Robert K. Merton.
See a tribute to Merton by his daughter Stephanie,
Tombrello’s widow. See also a Log24 post mentioning
Merton from Oct. 19, 2005. That post leads to a
post from the date of Merton’s death, Feb. 23, 2003.

From that 2003 post:

“Her wallet’s filled with pictures,
She gets ‘em one by one.”

— “Sweet Little Sixteen,” by Chuck Berry
(Chess Records, January 1958)

Monday, December 22, 2008

Monday December 22, 2008

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 11:07 AM
Fides et Ratio

Part I:
Ratio

Continued from…

    December 20, 2003

White, Geometric,
   and Eternal

Permutahedron-- a truncated octahedron with vertices labeled by the 24 permutations of four things

Makin' the Changes

(From "Flag Matroids," by
Borovik, Gelfand, and White)

Edward Rothstein,

Edward Rothstein on faith and reason, with snowflakes in an Absolut Vodka ad, NYT 12/20/03

White and Geometric,
 but not Eternal.

Part II:
Fides

Cocktail: the logo of the New York Times 'Proof' series

For more information,
click on the cocktail.
 

Saturday, December 17, 2005

Saturday December 17, 2005

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 6:02 PM
Thirst for
the Absolute

This world is not conclusion;
  A sequel stands beyond,
Invisible, as music,
  But positive, as sound.
It beckons and it baffles;     
  Philosophies don't know,
And through a riddle, at the last,  
  Sagacity must go….

— Emily Dickinson

From John Spencer's birthday,
December 20, in 2003:

Riddled:

The Absolutist Faith
of The New York Times

White and Geometric, but not Eternal.

(See previous entry.)

The title of this entry
  comes from within 
an entry of June 2, 2005,

The Barest Vocabulary
 at the Altar of Facts
.

Saturday, December 20, 2003

Saturday December 20, 2003

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 5:00 PM

White, Geometric, and Eternal

This afternoon's surfing:

Prompted by Edward Rothstein's own Fides et Ratio encyclical in today's NY Times, I googled him.

At the New York Review of Books, I came across the following by Rothstein:

"… statements about TNT can be represented within TNT: the formal system can, in a precise way, 'talk' about itself."

This naturally prompted me to check what is on TNT on this, the feast day of St. Emil Artin.  At 5 PM this afternoon, we have Al Pacino in "The Devil's Advocate" — a perfect choice for the festival of an alleged saint.

Preparing for Al, I meditated on the mystical significance of the number 373, as explained in Zen and Language Games: the page number 373 in Robert Stone's theological classic A Flag for Sunrise conveys the metaphysical significance of the phrase "diamonds are forever" — "the eternal in the temporal," according to Stone's Catholic priest.  This suggests a check of another theological classic, Pynchon's Gravity's RainbowPage 373 there begins with the following description of prewar Berlin:

"white and geometric."

This suggests the following illustration of a white and geometric object related to yesterday's entry on Helmut Wielandt:

From antiquark.com

Figure 1

(This object, which illustrates the phrase "makin' the changes," also occurs in this morning's entry on the death of a jazz musician.)

A further search for books containing "white" and "geometric" at Amazon.com yields the following:

Figure 2

From Mosaics, by
Fassett, Bahouth, and Patterson:

"A risco fountain in Mexico city, begun circa 1740 and made up of Mexican pottery and Chinese porcelain, including Ming.

The delicate oriental patterns on so many different-sized plates and saucers [are] underlined by the bold blue and white geometric tiles at the base."

Note that the tiles are those of Diamond Theory; the geometric object in figure 1 above illustrates a group that plays a central role in that theory.

Finally, the word "risco" (from Casa del Risco) associated with figure 2 above leads us to a rather significant theological site associated with the holy city of Santiago de Compostela:

Figure 3

Vicente Risco's
Dedalus in Compostela.

Figure 3 shows James Joyce (alias Dedalus), whose daughter Lucia inspired the recent entry Jazz on St. Lucia's Day — which in turn is related, by last night's 2:45 entry and by Figure 1, to the mathematics of group theory so well expounded by the putative saint Emil Artin.

"His lectures are best described as
polished diamonds."
Fine Hall in its Golden Age,
by Gian-Carlo Rota

If Pynchon plays the role of devil's advocate suggested by his creation, in Gravity's Rainbow, of the character Emil Bummer, we may hope that Rota, no longer in time but now in eternity, can be persuaded to play the important role of saint's advocate for his Emil.
 

Update of 6:30 PM 12/20/03:

Riddled:

The Absolutist Faith
of The New York Times

White and Geometric, but not Eternal.

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