Log24

Thursday, July 9, 2015

Man and His Symbols

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 2:24 PM

(Continued)

A post of July 7, Haiku for DeLillo, had a link to posts tagged "Holy Field GF(3)."

As the smallest Galois field based on an odd prime, this structure 
clearly is of fundamental importance.  

The Galois field GF(3)

It is, however, perhaps too  small  to be visually impressive.

A larger, closely related, field, GF(9), may be pictured as a 3×3 array

hence as the traditional Chinese  Holy Field.

Marketing the Holy Field

IMAGE- The Ninefold Square, in China 'The Holy Field'

The above illustration of China's  Holy Field occurred in the context of
Log24 posts on Child Buyers.   For more on child buyers, see an excellent
condemnation today by Diane Ravitch of the U. S. Secretary of Education.

Friday, July 10, 2015

Without Border

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 3:18 PM

The previous post's Holy Field symbol, 
with border removed, becomes the
Chinese character for "well."

See also The Lost Well.

Saturday, February 14, 2009

Saturday February 14, 2009

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:00 PM
“Somewhere in the
   heart of Rome”

Sinatra, 1954  

'Man and His Symbols,' by Carl Jung and others

USA Today:

Geithner has some success
with world stage debut

Bernanke and Geithner at Rome G7 on Valentine's Day

'Enlarge' symbol from USA Today

Click for commentary.

Sunday, September 19, 2004

Sunday September 19, 2004

Filed under: General — m759 @ 5:01 PM

Man and His Symbols

5:01:22

  

Friday, November 8, 2002

Friday November 8, 2002

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 3:33 AM

Religious Symbolism
at Princeton

In memory of Steve McQueen (“The Great Escape” and “The Thomas Crown Affair”… see preceding entry) and of Rudolf Augstein (publisher of Der Spiegel), both of whom died on November 7 (in 1980 and 2002, respectively), in memory of the following residents of

The Princeton Cemetery
of the Nassau Presbyterian Church
Established 1757

SYLVIA BEACH (1887-1962), whose father was pastor of the First Presbyterian Church, founded Shakespeare & Company, a Paris bookshop which became a focus for struggling expatriate writers. In 1922 she published James Joyce’s Ulysses when others considered it obscene, and she defiantly closed her shop in 1941 in protest against the Nazi occupation.

KURT GĂ–DEL (1906-1978), a world-class mathematician famous for a vast array of major contributions to logic, was a longtime professor at the Institute for Advanced Study, founded in 1930. He was a corecipient of the Einstein Award in 1951.

JOHN (HENRY) O’HARA (1905-1970) was a voluminous and much-honored writer. His novels, Appointment in Samarra (1934) and Ten North Frederick (1955), and his collection of short stories, Pal Joey (1940), are among his best-known works.

and of the long and powerful association of Princeton University with the Presbyterian Church, as well as the theological perspective of Carl Jung in Man and His Symbols, I offer the following “windmill,” taken from the Presbyterian Creedal Standards website, as a memorial:

The background music Les Moulins de Mon Coeur, selected yesterday morning in memory of Steve McQueen, continues to be appropriate.

“A is for Anna.”
— James Joyce

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