Log24

Wednesday, February 11, 2015

Dead Reckoning

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 5:28 PM

Continued from yesterday evening

IMAGE- Bogart in 'Casablanca' with chessboard

Today's mathematical birthday — 

Claude Chevalley, 11 Feb. 1909 – 28 June 1984.

From MacTutor —

Chevalley's daughter, Catherine Chevalley, wrote about
her father in "Claude Chevalley described by his daughter"
(1988):—

For him it was important to see questions as a whole, to see the necessity of a proof, its global implications. As to rigour, all the members of Bourbaki cared about it: the Bourbaki movement was started essentially because rigour was lacking among French mathematicians, by comparison with the Germans, that is the Hilbertians. Rigour consisted in getting rid of an accretion of superfluous details. Conversely, lack of rigour gave my father an impression of a proof where one was walking in mud, where one had to pick up some sort of filth in order to get ahead. Once that filth was taken away, one could get at the mathematical object, a sort of crystallized body whose essence is its structure. When that structure had been constructed, he would say it was an object which interested him, something to look at, to admire, perhaps to turn around, but certainly not to transform. For him, rigour in mathematics consisted in making a new object which could thereafter remain unchanged.

The way my father worked, it seems that this was what counted most, this production of an object which then became inert— dead, really. It was no longer to be altered or transformed. Not that there was any negative connotation to this. But I must add that my father was probably the only member of Bourbaki who thought of mathematics as a way to put objects to death for aesthetic reasons.

Recent scholarly news suggests a search for Chapel Hill
in this journal. That search leads to Transformative Hermeneutics.
Those who, like Professor Eucalyptus of Wallace Stevens's
New Haven, seek God "in the object itself" may contemplate
yesterday's afternoon post on Eightfold Design in light of the
Transformative post and of yesterday's New Haven remarks and
Chapel Hill events.

Monday, May 9, 2011

Queen’s Gambit*

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:00 AM

From March 9 four years ago—

Chessboard (Detail)

* See this journal and the novel.

Update of 10 AM May 9—

Midrash for Gnostics —

A post linked to under "this journal" (above) has a brief discussion of theology and Wallace Stevens—

"Professor Eucalyptus in 'Ordinary Evening' XIV, for example, 'seeks/ God in the object itself '…."

I have more confidence that God is to be found in the Ping Pong balls of the New York Lottery.

This suggests a check of yesterday's NY numbers. They were… Midday 780, Evening 302.

A search for 780 in this journal yields a post quoting The Scotsman 's reporter Rhiannon Edward.

Related material:

Rhiannon's Scotsman  story of May 6—

Rapist gets 20 years after justice system finally believes his victims

Published Date: 06 May 2011
By Rhiannon Edward
 
A SCOTTISH care home worker who groomed and raped teenage girls for more than a decade has been jailed for 20 years.
 
James Boyes abused a string of underage girls at Frant Court care home in Frant, East Sussex, during the 1980s and 1990s, leaving one so traumatised she is still being treated in a secure mental hospital….

See also this  journal on May 7 —

Stranger Than Fiction

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11A/110507-StrangerThanFiction.jpg

For yesterday's NY evening 302, see the "780" post involving Rhiannon—

Glenn Ford as a playboy from Argentina —

The 4 Horsemen, Ingrid Thulin, Glenn Ford

— and "302" interpreted as "3/02," which yields…

"Yo sé de un laberinto griego que es una línea única, recta."
 —Borges, "La Muerte y la Brújula"

"I know of one Greek labyrinth which is a single straight line."
—Borges, "Death and the Compass"

For some background music, click here.

Friday, July 16, 2010

Meditation

Filed under: General — m759 @ 2:15 AM

From a religious meditation on St. Peter's Day, 2008, "Big Rock"—

An academic quotes Wallace Stevens:
"Professor Eucalyptus in 'Ordinary Evening' XIV, for example, 'seeks/ God in the object itself'…."

My reaction:
"I have more confidence that God is to be found in the Ping Pong balls of the New York Lottery."

From today's New York Lottery— Midday 215, Evening 000.

The latter number seems to speak with a certain authority.

The former may or may not mean something. See a search for "2/15" in this journal.

Sunday, June 29, 2008

Sunday June 29, 2008

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 8:00 AM

Big Rock

"I'm going to hit this problem
with a big rock."

– Mathematical saying,
quoted here
in July of 2006

June 28, 2007:

A professor discusses a poem by Wallace Stevens:

"Professor Eucalyptus in 'Ordinary Evening' XIV, for example, 'seeks/ God in the object itself,' but this quest culminates in his own choosing of 'the commodious adjective/ For what he sees… the description that makes it divinity, still speech… not grim/ Reality but reality grimly seen/ And spoken in paradisal parlance new'…."

– Douglas Mao, Solid Objects:Modernism and the Test of Production, Princeton University Press, 1998, p. 242
 
"God in the object" seems
unlikely to be found in the
artifact pictured on the
cover of Mao's book:
 
Cover of 'Solid Objects,' by Douglas Mao

I have more confidence
that God is to be found
in the Ping Pong balls of
  the New York Lottery….

These objects may be
regarded as supplying
a parlance that is, if not
paradisal, at least
intelligible– if only in
the context of my own
personal experience.

June 28, 2008:

NY Lottery June 28, 2008: Mid-day 629, Evening 530

These numbers can, of course,
be interpreted as symbols of
the dates 6/29 and 5/30.

The last Log24 entry of
 6/29 (St. Peter's Day):

"The rock cannot be broken.
It is the truth."
– Wallace Stevens,
"Credences of Summer"

The last Log24 entry of
5/30 (St. Joan's Day):

The Nature of Evil

Thursday, June 28, 2007

Thursday June 28, 2007

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:00 PM
Real Numbers:
An Object Lesson

(continued from
Anti-Christmas)

A Cornell professor discusses a poem by Wallace Stevens:

"Professor Eucalyptus in 'Ordinary Evening' XIV, for example, 'seeks/ God in the object itself,' but this quest culminates in his own choosing of 'the commodious adjective/ For what he sees… the description that makes it divinity, still speech… not grim/ Reality but reality grimly seen/ And spoken in paradisal parlance new'…."

— Douglas Mao, Solid Objects:
Modernism and the Test
of Production,
Princeton University Press,
1998, p. 242
 
"God in the object" seems
unlikely to be found in the
artifact pictured on the
cover of Mao's book:
 
Solid Objects by Douglas Mao
 
I have more confidence
that God is to be found
in the Ping Pong balls
of the New York Lottery.
 
NY Lottery June 28, 2007: Mid-day 309, Evening 514

These objects may be
regarded as supplying
a parlance that is, if not
paradisal, at least
intelligible– if only in
the context of my own
personal experience:

Journal entry dated 5/14:

 
The Pope asks 'What is real?'
 
Journal entries dated 3/09:

Queen's Gambit
,
Symbols, and
Is Nothing Sacred?

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