Log24

Thursday, March 8, 2018

L’Engle Time Fold

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:04 PM

Search this journal for the three words of the title.

Monday, March 15, 2021

The Time Signature

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 3:07 PM

(A sequel to the previous post, “The Abstract Signature“)

Hillbilly Elegy

Sunday, May 3, 2020

Crichton Time

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 2:37 PM


Thursday, April 16, 2020

Snow White’s Time in Space

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 2:32 PM

Kristen Stewart — 'Freezin' my ass off'

See as well Pi Day 2020.

Monday, February 24, 2020

For “Time Cube” Fans

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 3:53 AM

See also Time Cube elsewhere in this  journal.

Monday, December 30, 2019

Number and Time

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:37 AM

(Hat tip for the title to Marie-Louise von Franz.)

Remarks by Metod Saniga from the previous post

Remarks by Wolfgang Pauli, a friend of von Franz

"This is to show the world that I can paint like Titian.
[Empty frame with jagged sides]. Only technical details
are missing."
— As quoted at Derevianko Group.

Related material (see Oct. 11, 2010) —

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101011-137JungPauli-sm.jpg

Sunday, June 4, 2017

In Memory of the Time Cube Page*

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 10:00 PM

From this journal on August 18, 2015, "A Wrinkle in Terms" —

For two misuses by John Baez of the phrase “permutation group”
at the n-Category Café, see “A Wrinkle in the Mathematical Universe
and “Re: A Wrinkle…” —

“There is  such a thing as a permutation group.”
— Adapted from A Wrinkle in Time , by Madeleine L’Engle

* See RIP, Time Cube at gizmodo.com (September 1, 2015).

Tuesday, March 16, 2021

Maybe Not So New

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:39 AM

Monday, March 15, 2021

Project

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:41 PM

“Before time began, there was the Cube.” — Optimus Prime

Saturday, March 13, 2021

Eternal Spark

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:43 AM

According to Lt. Col. Wayne M. McDonnell in June 1983 —

“… it is accurate to observe that when a person experiences
the out-of- body state he is, in fact, projecting that eternal spark
of consciousness and memory which constitutes the ultimate
source of his identity….”

— Section 27, “Consciousness in Perspective,” of
“Analysis and Assessment of Gateway Process.”

A related quotation —

“In truth, the physical AllSpark  is but a shell….”

https://tfwiki.net/wiki/AllSpark

From the post Ghost in the Shell  (Feb. 26, 2019) —

See also, from posts tagged Ogdoad Space

“Like the Valentinian Ogdoad— a self-creating theogonic system
of eight Aeons in four begetting pairs— the projected eightfold work
had an esoteric, gnostic quality; much of Frye’s formal interest lay in
the ‘schematosis’ and fearful symmetries of his own presentations.”

— From p. 61 of James C. Nohrnberg’s “The Master of the Myth
of Literature: An Interpenetrative Ogdoad for Northrop Frye,”
Comparative Literature , Vol. 53 No. 1, pp. 58-82, Duke University
Press (quarterlyJanuary 2001)

— as well as . . .

Related illustration from posts tagged with
the quilt term Yankee Puzzle

IMAGE- 'Yankee Puzzle' quilt block pattern on cover of Northrop Frye's 'Anatomy of Criticism'

Wednesday, November 18, 2020

The Octad Club

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:03 AM

“Principles before personalities.” — AA motto

Related personalities —

The Metaphysical Club .

Amazon.com review by John Miller :

“… The Metaphysical Club  is not a dry tome for academics.
Instead, it is a quadruple biography … .”

Related principles —

The Octad Group .

Friday, August 21, 2020

Ludwig Wittgenstein, P.I.

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 7:21 PM

“What is your aim in philosophy?—To show the fly
the way out of the fly-bottle.”

 LUDWIG WITTGENSTEIN
 “Philosophical Investigations”  

Related philosophical investigations —

This morning’s post Gap Dance and a 2012 film . . .

“Three magazine employees head out on an assignment
to interview a guy who placed a classified advertisement
seeking a companion for time travel.” — IMDb

The finished film does not follow the script exactly. (The above
dialogue is rendered more in the spirit of Hunter Thompson.)

Gap Dance

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:22 AM

Continues.

“What would the pavement of the universe be
if there were gaps between the paving stones,
inaccessible and filled with nothing?”

— “Concerning Time,” by Iannis Xenakis and
Roberta Brown, on page 85, Perspectives of New Music ,
Vol. 27, No. 1 (Winter, 1989, pp. 84-92).

This post was suggested by the Aug. 19 remarks of
Karmela Padavic-Callaghan in Scientific American .

'Time's Arrow Flies through 500 Years of Classical Music'

Music for The Bowler and Casanova Frankenstein

Image from the website of the Scientific American  author.

Saturday, August 15, 2020

Waiting for the Light at the End of Daisy’s Dock

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 3:36 PM

See also Light History.

Friday, August 14, 2020

Exercise

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 11:00 PM

I prefer the boom box above to the one in Old Wives’ Tale (Aug. 10).

Sunday, May 17, 2020

Classics Illustrated

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:32 PM

Related image —

Sunday, May 3, 2020

Into the Westworld

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 2:03 PM

He beomes aware of something else… some other presence.
“Anybody here?” he says.
I am here.
He almost jumps, it is so loud. Or it seems loud. Then he wonders if
he has heard anything at all.
“Did you speak?”
No.
How are we communicating? he wonders.
The way everything communicates with everything else.
Which way is that?
Why do you ask if you already know the answer?

— Sphere   by Michael Crichton, Harvard ’64

Thursday, April 16, 2020

A Four-Color Epic

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 4:15 PM

A love story of epic, epic, epic proportion” — Kristen Stewart

See also the following letter to Knuth on four-color enthusiast
Spencer-Brown, as well as Tim Robinson on the same subject
in his book My Time in Space .

The Dreaming

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 1:19 PM

Wednesday, April 15, 2020

Death Warmed Over

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 4:01 PM

In memory of the author of  My Time in Space * —

Tim Robinson, who reportedly died on April 3 —

 See also an image from a Log24 post, Gray Space

Related material from Robinson’s reported date of death —

* First edition, hardcover, Lilliput Press, Ireland, April 1, 2001.

Saturday, March 14, 2020

Compare and Contrast.

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 9:38 PM

Logos —

See also Devs .

Tuesday, January 14, 2020

Physics for the Vatican

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 1:31 PM

From Devil's Night 2019

Friday, January 10, 2020

Jan. 9 Review

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 10:51 AM

“Work as if you were in the
early days of a better nation.”

— God, according to the author of
    1982 Janine

From Carole A. Holdsworth,
"Dulcinea and Pynchon’s V":

Tanner may have stated it best:

“V. is whatever lights you to
 the end of the street:
 she is also the dark annihilation
 waiting at  the end of the street.”

(Tony Tanner, page 36,
 “V. and V-2,” in
 Pynchon: A Collection
 of Critical Essays.

 Ed. Edward Mendelson.
 Englewood Cliffs, N. J.:
 Prentice-Hall, 1978. 16-55).

She’s a mystery
She’s everything
   a woman should be
Woman in black
   got a hold on me

— Foreigner 4

The Lotos Rose

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 12:01 AM

See the title in this journal.

Thursday, January 9, 2020

Universal History (Adapted)

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 11:05 PM

"One of the more fortuitous encounters of late-20th-century popular culture —
almost up there with Lennon meets McCartney and Taylor meets Burton —
took place on Labor Day 1965, at Jane Fonda’s Malibu beach house. The
actress was hosting a daylong bash at which her father, Henry’s,
generation mingled uneasily with her Hollywood hippie friends. The Byrds
played in the backyard. A young comedian-turned-film director named Mike
Nichols was approached by an improv comic-turned-itinerant writer named
Buck Henry, who asked how he was doing. Nichols dourly looked around
at all the proto-Summer of Love vibes and said, 'Here, under the shadow
of the great tree, I have found peace.'

Henry immediately recognized a sardonic East Coast kindred spirit trapped
in Lotusland . . . ."

—  Ty Burr,  Boston Globe  staff, January 9, 2020, 10:34 AM

Adapt or Die

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 11:53 AM

For Hollywood

Maybe.

For Emily Yahr (see second item above) —

Buck Henry reportedly died yesterday, January 8, 2020.
This journal on that date a year earlier —

Monday, December 30, 2019

Death on Becket’s Day

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 10:22 AM

Author Alasdair Gray reportedly died yesterday,
on the feast of St. Thomas à Becket.

"His Collected Verse  (2010) was followed by 
Every Short Story 1951-2012 . Hell and Purgatory ,
the first two parts of his version of Dante’s
Divine Comedy , “decorated and Englished in
prosaic verse”, appeared in 2018 and 2019. 
In November Gray received the inaugural 
Saltire Society Scottish Lifetime Achievement award."

— https://www.theguardian.com/books/2019/dec/29/
alasdair-gray-obituary

See some related remarks from May 15, 1998.

Sunday, December 29, 2019

Springer Link

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 5:08 PM

Related reading

"I closed my eyes and saw the number 137—
so very close to the reciprocal of alpha—
on the chest of the runner in Van Cortlandt Park.
Should I start the story there? "

— Alpert, Mark.  Saint Joan of New York
(Science and Fiction) (p. 103).
Springer International Publishing. Kindle edition. 

Cover detail:

See as well St. Joan in this  journal.

Morning of the Iguana

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:03 AM

Adam Gopnik in The New Yorker  this morning

" mysteriously durable manner of mythical depiction,
which runs forward to Egyptian wall paintings and,
for that matter, to modern animation. Therianthropes,
it seems, reflect the symbolic practice of giving to
humans the powers of animals, a shamanistic rite
that seems tied to the origins of religion, and here it is,
for the first time, a startup.

 one of the human figures, we’re told, has
'a tapering profile that possibly merges into the base
of a thick tail and with short, curved limbs splayed out
to the side. In our opinion, this part of the body resembles
the lower half of a lizard or crocodile. …' "

Related art

Logo by Saul Bass.

Friday, December 27, 2019

Showbiz Requiems

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 11:41 PM

http://www.log24.com/log/pix18/180810-Huston-chessboard-post-100710.jpg

Thursday, December 26, 2019

In Memoriam: Nick Tosches

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:44 AM

Thursday, June 13, 2019

The Reality Blocks

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:24 PM

The new Log24 tag "Eightfold Metaphysics" used in the previous post
suggests a review of posts that were tagged "The Reality Blocks" on May 24.

Then there is, of course, the May 24 death of Murray Gell-Mann, who
hijacked from Buddhism the phrase "eightfold way."

See Gell-Mann in this journal and May 24, 2003.

Seeing the Seing

Filed under: General — Tags: , , , — m759 @ 2:30 PM

The phrase "experimental metaphysics" appeared in Peter Woit's weblog on June 11.
Google reveals that . . .

" 'experimental metaphysics' is a term coined by Abner Shimony …."

Shimony reportedly died on August 8, 2015.  Also on that date —

Tuesday, May 28, 2019

Quaternion at Candlebrow

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:00 AM

From a Groundhog Day post in 2009 —

The Candlebrow Conference
in Pynchon's Against the Day:

The conferees had gathered here from all around the world…. Their spirits all one way or another invested in, invested by, the siegecraft of Time and its mysteries.

"Fact is, our system of so-called linear time is based on a circular or, if you like, periodic phenomenon– the earth's own spin. Everything spins, up to and including, probably, the whole universe. So we can look to the prairie, the darkening sky, the birthing of a funnel-cloud to see in its vortex the fundamental structure of everything–"

Quaternion in finite geometry
Quaternion  by  S. H. Cullinane

"Um, Professor–"….

… Those in attendance, some at quite high speed, had begun to disperse, the briefest of glances at the sky sufficing to explain why. As if the professor had lectured it into being, there now swung from the swollen and light-pulsing clouds to the west a classic prairie "twister"….

… In the storm cellar, over semiliquid coffee and farmhouse crullers left from the last twister, they got back to the topic of periodic functions….

"Eternal Return, just to begin with. If we may construct such functions in the abstract, then so must it be possible to construct more secular, more physical expressions."

"Build a time machine."

"Not the way I would have put it, but if you like, fine."

Vectorists and Quaternionists in attendance reminded everybody of the function they had recently worked up….

"We thus enter the whirlwind. It becomes the very essence of a refashioned life, providing the axes to which everything will be referred. Time no long 'passes,' with a linear velocity, but 'returns,' with an angular one…. We are returned to ourselves eternally, or, if you like, timelessly."

"Born again!" exclaimed a Christer in the gathering, as if suddenly enlightened.

Above, the devastation had begun.

"As if the professor had lectured it into being . . . ."

See other posts now tagged McLuhan Time.

Monday, May 27, 2019

But Seriously . . .

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:32 PM

McLuhan on Analogy.

I prefer the simple "four dots" figure
of the double colon:

For those who prefer stranger analogies . . .

Actors from "The Eiger Sanction" —

Doctor Strange on Mount Everest —

Dr. Strange at beyondtheopposites.com on 2016/12/02

See as well this  journal on the above Strange date, 2016/12/02,
in posts tagged Lumber Room.

Thursday, March 29, 2018

“Before Creation Itself . . .”

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , , — m759 @ 10:13 AM

From the Diamond Theorem Facebook page —

A question three hours ago at that page

“Is this Time Cube?”

Notes toward an answer —

And from Six-Set Geometry in this journal . . .

Thursday, March 8, 2018

Thanking the Academy…

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 9:11 PM

Continues.

Sunday, September 3, 2017

Dead Poet

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 6:48 PM

The time is from
a screenshot 
of my RSS feed.

"All in good time."

(See this morning's
  Mosaic Logic.)

Obit

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:35 AM

See also Steely Dan in this  journal.

Wednesday, June 7, 2017

Three Things at Once

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 1:28 PM

Rosalind Krauss in 1979

Nanavira Thera in 1959

Cambridge University Press in 1999 —

See also Cube Bricks.

Sunday, November 27, 2016

A Machine That Will Fit

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 8:00 AM

Or:  Notes for the Metaphysical Club

Northrop Frye on Wallace Stevens:

"He… stands in contrast to the the dualistic
approach of Eliot, who so often speaks of poetry
as though it were an emotional and sensational
soul looking for a 'correlative' skeleton of
thought to be provided by a philosopher, a
Cartesian ghost trying to find a machine that
will fit."

Ralph Waldo Emerson on "vacant and vain" knowledge:

"The new position of the advancing man has all
the powers of the old, yet has them all new. It
carries in its bosom all the energies of the past,
yet is itself an exhalation of the morning. I cast
away in this new moment all my once hoarded
knowledge, as vacant and vain." 

Harold Bloom on Emerson:

"Emerson may not have invented the American
Sublime, yet he took eternal possession of it." 

Wallace Stevens on the American Sublime:

"And the sublime comes down
To the spirit itself,

The spirit and space,
The empty spirit
In vacant space."

A founding member of the Metaphysical Club:

See also the eightfold cube.

Thursday, November 3, 2016

Triple Cross

(Continued See the title in this journal, as well as Cube Bricks.)

Cube Bricks 1984 —

An Approach to Symmetric Generation of the Simple Group of Order 168
Related material —

Dirac and Geometry in this journal,
Kummer’s Quartic Surface in this journal,
Nanavira Thera in this journal, and
The Razor’s Edge  and Nanavira Thera.

See as well Bill Murray’s 1984 film “The Razor’s Edge”

Movie poster from 1984 —

“A thin line separates
love from hate,
success from failure,
life from death.”

Three other dualities, from Nanavira Thera in 1959 —

“I find that there are, in every situation,
three independent dualities….”

(Click to enlarge.)

Wednesday, October 5, 2016

The Crichton Prize …

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:32 AM

Goes to Feynman, Epstein, and Kaplan

“A self-replicating swarm of predatory molecules
is rapidly evolving outside the plant.”

Amazon.com synopsis of Michael Crichton’s
2002 novel Prey

Washington Post  online today —

Nobel Prize in chemistry is awarded
for molecular machines

” The physicist and Nobel laureate Richard Feynman
gave a seminal lecture on the subject in 1959,
envisioning a ‘great future’ in which ‘we can arrange
the atoms the way we want; the very atoms,
all the way down.’ ” — Sarah Kaplan

Richard Feynman in 1959

“How do we write small?”

Related material quoted here on Sunday morning, Oct. 2, 2016 —

Westworld  is especially impressive because it builds two worlds
at once: the Western theme park and the futuristic workplace.
The Western half of Westworld  might be the more purely
entertaining of the two, with its shootouts and heists and chases
through sublime desert vistas. Behind the scenes, the theme park’s
workers show how the robot sausage is made. And as a dystopian
office drama, the show does something truly original.”

— Adam Epstein at QUARTZ, October 1, 2016

Sunday, September 25, 2016

Introduction to Pragmatism

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 7:29 AM

Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy
on the origins of Pragmatism:

"Pragmatism had been born in the discussions at
a ‘metaphysical club’ in Harvard around 1870
(see Menand…*). Peirce and James participated
in these discussions along with some other philosophers
and philosophically inclined lawyers. As we have
already noted, Peirce developed these ideas in his
publications from the 1870s."

From "How to Make Our Ideas Clear,"
by Charles Sanders Peirce in 1878 —

"The very first lesson that we have a right to demand that logic shall teach us is, how to make our ideas clear; and a most important one it is, depreciated only by minds who stand in need of it. To know what we think, to be masters of our own meaning, will make a solid foundation for great and weighty thought. It is most easily learned by those whose ideas are meagre and restricted; and far happier they than such as wallow helplessly in a rich mud of conceptions. A nation, it is true, may, in the course of generations, overcome the disadvantage of an excessive wealth of language and its natural concomitant, a vast, unfathomable deep of ideas. We may see it in history, slowly perfecting its literary forms, sloughing at length its metaphysics, and, by virtue of the untirable patience which is often a compensation, attaining great excellence in every branch of mental acquirement. The page of history is not yet unrolled which is to tell us whether such a people will or will not in the long-run prevail over one whose ideas (like the words of their language) are few, but which possesses a wonderful mastery over those which it has. For an individual, however, there can be no question that a few clear ideas are worth more than many confused ones. A young man would hardly be persuaded to sacrifice the greater part of his thoughts to save the rest; and the muddled head is the least apt to see the necessity of such a sacrifice. Him we can usually only commiserate, as a person with a congenital defect. Time will help him, but intellectual maturity with regard to clearness comes rather late, an unfortunate arrangement of Nature, inasmuch as clearness is of less use to a man settled in life, whose errors have in great measure had their effect, than it would be to one whose path lies before him. It is terrible to see how a single unclear idea, a single formula without meaning, lurking in a young man's head, will sometimes act like an obstruction of inert matter in an artery, hindering the nutrition of the brain, and condemning its victim to pine away in the fullness of his intellectual vigor and in the midst of intellectual plenty. Many a man has cherished for years as his hobby some vague shadow of an idea, too meaningless to be positively false; he has, nevertheless, passionately loved it, has made it his companion by day and by night, and has given to it his strength and his life, leaving all other occupations for its sake, and in short has lived with it and for it, until it has become, as it were, flesh of his flesh and bone of his bone; and then he has waked up some bright morning to find it gone, clean vanished away like the beautiful Melusina of the fable, and the essence of his life gone with it. I have myself known such a man; and who can tell how many histories of circle-squarers, metaphysicians, astrologers, and what not, may not be told in the old German story?"

Peirce himself may or may not have been entirely successful
in making his ideas clear.  See Where Credit Is Due  (Log24, 
June 11, 2016) and the Wikipedia article Categories (Peirce).

* Menand, L., 2001. The Metaphysical Club A Story of
Ideas in America
 
, New York:  Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Friday, August 19, 2016

Princeton University Press in 1947

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 11:17 AM

From a review, in the context of Hollywood, of a Princeton
University Press book on William Blake from 1947 —

Friday, October 23, 2015

Retro or Not?

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Happy birthday to the late Michael Crichton (Harvard ’64).

See also Diamond Theory Roulette —

Part of the ReCode Project (http://recodeproject.com).
Based on "Diamond Theory" by Steven H. Cullinane,
originally published in "Computer Graphics and Art" 
Vol. 2 No. 1, February 1977.
Copyright (c) 2013 Radames Ajna 
— OSI/MIT license (http://recodeproject/license).

Related remarks on Plato for Harvard’s
Graduate School of Design

See also posts from the above publication date, March 31,
2006, among posts now tagged “The Church in Philadelphia.”

Wednesday, April 29, 2015

Scenes from…

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 9:00 AM

An Epic for Drink Boy —

Context:  The post in which the above scenes occur.

Tuesday, February 10, 2015

In Memoriam…

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 12:25 PM

industrial designer Kenji Ekuan —

Eightfold Design.

The adjective "eightfold," intrinsic to Buddhist
thought, was hijacked by Gell-Mann and later 
by the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute
(MSRI, pronounced "misery").  The adjective's
application to a 2x2x2 cube consisting of eight
subcubes, "the eightfold cube," is not intended to
have either Buddhist or Semitic overtones.  
It is pure mathematics.

Monday, November 3, 2014

Wisconsin Death Trip*

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 8:59 PM

Courtesy of Mira Sorvino.

Enter Madison :

From “Intruders,” BBC America, Season 1, Episode 2, at 1:07 of 43:31.

You sure know how to show a girl a good time.

* The title is a reference to a Wisconsin-related Halloween post.

Friday, October 31, 2014

For the Late Hans Schneider

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 3:30 AM

See a University of Wisconsin obituary for Schneider,
a leading expert on linear algebra who reportedly died
at 87 on Tuesday, October 28, 2014.

Some background on linear algebra and “magic” squares:
tonight’s 3 AM (ET) post and a search in this
journal for Knight, Death, and the Devil.

Click image to enlarge.

Friday, November 30, 2012

Point

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:31 PM

"….mirando il punto  
a cui tutti li tempi son presenti"

— Dante, Paradiso , XVII, 17-18

 For instance

IMAGE- Three films from Christmas 1963 (IMDb): Captain Newman, MD; The Prize; Love with the Proper Stranger

Click image for higher quality.

Wednesday, November 14, 2012

Group Actions

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , — m759 @ 4:30 PM

The December 2012 Notices of the American
Mathematical Society  
has an ad on page 1564
(in a review of two books on vulgarized mathematics)
for three workshops next year on “Low-dimensional
Topology, Geometry, and Dynamics”—

(Only the top part of the ad is shown; for further details
see an ICERM page.)

(ICERM stands for Institute for Computational
and Experimental Research in Mathematics.)

The ICERM logo displays seven subcubes of
a 2x2x2 eight-cube array with one cube missing—

The logo, apparently a stylized image of the architecture
of the Providence building housing ICERM, is not unlike
a picture of Froebel’s Third Gift—

 

Froebel's third gift, the eightfold cube

© 2005 The Institute for Figuring

Photo by Norman Brosterman from the Inventing Kindergarten
exhibit at The Institute for Figuring (co-founded by Margaret Wertheim)

The eighth cube, missing in the ICERM logo and detached in the
Froebel Cubes photo, may be regarded as representing the origin
(0,0,0) in a coordinatized version of the 2x2x2 array—
in other words the cube invariant under linear , as opposed to
more general affine , permutations of the cubes in the array.

These cubes are not without relevance to the workshops’ topics—
low-dimensional exotic geometric structures, group theory, and dynamics.

See The Eightfold Cube, A Simple Reflection Group of Order 168, and
The Quaternion Group Acting on an Eightfold Cube.

Those who insist on vulgarizing their mathematics may regard linear
and affine group actions on the eight cubes as the dance of
Snow White (representing (0,0,0)) and the Seven Dwarfs—

.

Monday, July 11, 2011

The Witch of And/Or

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 PM

AND: Logical conjunction, symbolized as… 

OR:    Logical disjunction, symbolized as…  

AND/OR: Logical confusion, symbolized as…  IMAGE- AND and OR symbols combined as Lacanian AND/OR lozenge
according to a woman Lacanian analyst in this journal.

See also another female disciple of Lacan
writing as co-author with a philosophy professor
in Saturday's online New York Times 's "The Stone"—

"Let Be: An Answer to Hamlet’s Question."

Perhaps they thought the question was…

 

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11B/110711-ANDOR.jpg

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11B/110711-Wikipedia_Portrait_of_Simon_Critchley.jpg

Wikipedia portrait of New School
philosopher Simon Critchley

"To be and/or not to be?"

For a more philosophically respectable approach to
the same shape, see Sunday morning's Wittgenstein's Diamond.

"We're gonna need more holy water." —Hollywood saying

Dark Lady

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 5:01 AM

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11B/110711-5AM-NYT-Inside.jpg

From an obituary of choreographer Roland Petit, who died on Sunday, July 10, 2011—

"Ballerina roles had for more than a century been largely made on pale romantically suffering virgins or royal princesses; Petit’s women were liberated and exciting, modern and tangibly real— and yet archaic femmes fatales . Probably his most popular ballet worldwide is Le jeune homme et la mort , in which a young bloke lazing around in his room is visited by an enigmatic, seductive female— at the end of which brief encounter he hangs himself.

The young man’s role was seized upon by the great ballet stars of the next decades, Rudolf Nureyev and Mikhail Baryshnikov notable among them. As with Carmen, the role of La Mort, the death goddess, has been sought out by a pantheon of great ballerinas, in Paris, Russia and the US as well as in Europe." —Ismene Brown at theartsdesk.com

From the philosophy column "The Stone" in Saturday's online New York Times

July 9, 2011, 4:45 PM: "Let Be: An Answer to Hamlet’s Question"—

"Jamieson Webster is a psychoanalyst in private practice
in New York. She is the author of
'The Life and Death of Psychoanalysis'
forthcoming from Karnac Books.
"

Related ART WARS material:

  1. An illustrated essay by Webster posted on March 7, 2009 at The Symptom 10 weblog
  2. An illustrated essay by Cullinane posted on March 7,  2009 at the Log24 weblog
  3. Time and Eternity
  4. Lovely, Dark and Deep

Monday, March 7, 2011

Punto

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 9:00 AM

"Time it goes so fast
When you're having fun"

— "Another Manic Monday"

"….mirando il punto 
a cui tutti li tempi son presenti"

– Dante, Paradiso , XVII, 17-18

See mirando  in this journal.
       See also Time Fold.

Monday, December 20, 2010

Contenders

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 7:27 PM

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101220-CroweHook2.jpg
Happy birthday to noir queen Audrey Totter. She starred in “The Set-Up,” a 1949 fight film.

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101220-Set-Up72minSm.jpg

“You sure know how to show a girl a good time.”
— Renée Zellweger in “New in Town” (2009)

Sunday, July 11, 2010

Philosophers’ Keystone

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 2:02 AM

(Background— Yesterday's Quarter to Three,
A Manifold Showing, Class of 64, and Child's Play.)

Image-- Notes on Lowry's arrival in Mexico on the ship 'Pennsylvania'

Image-- PA Lottery Saturday, July 10, 2010-- Midday 017, Evening 673

Hermeneutics

Fans of Gregory Chaitin and Harry Potter
may consult Writings for Yom Kippur
for the meaning of yesterday's evening 673.

(See also Lowry and Cabbala.)

Fans of Elizabeth Taylor, Ava Gardner,
and the Dark Lady may consult Prime Suspect
for the meaning of yesterday's midday 17.

For some more serious background, see Dante—

"….mirando il punto 
a cui tutti li tempi son presenti
"

– Dante, Paradiso, XVII, 17-18

The symbol    is used throughout the entire book
in place of such phrases as ‘Q.E.D.’  or
‘This completes the proof of the theorem’
to signal the end of a proof.”

Measure Theory, by Paul R. Halmos, Van Nostrand, 1950      

           
Halmos died on the date of Yom Kippur —  
October 2, 2006.            

Saturday, July 10, 2010

Class of 64

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Samuel Beckett on Dante and Joyce:

"Another point of comparison is the preoccupation
  with the significance of numbers."

"If I'd been out 'til quarter to three
Would you lock the door,
Will you still need me, will you still feed me,
When I'm sixty-four?"

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10A/100710--HustonBoard.GIF

Happy birthday to Sue Lyon (Night of the Iguana, 1964)

Monday, December 22, 2008

Monday December 22, 2008

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:00 PM

The Folding

Hamlet, Act 1, Scene 5

Ghost:

“I could a tale unfold whose lightest word
Would harrow up thy soul, freeze thy young blood,
Make thy two eyes, like stars, start from their spheres,
Thy knotted and combined locks to part
And each particular hair to stand on end,
Like quills upon the fretful porpentine:
But this eternal blazon must not be
To ears of flesh and blood. List, list, O, list!”

This recalls the title of a piece in this week’s New Yorker:”The Book of Lists:
Susan Sontag’s early journals
.” (See Log24 on Thursday, Dec. 18.)

In the rather grim holiday spirit of that piece, here are some journal notes for Sontag, whom we may imagine as the ghost of Hanukkah past.

There are at least two ways of folding a list (or tale) to fit a rectangular frame.The normal way, used in typesetting English prose and poetry, starts at the top, runs from left to right, jumps down a line, then again runs left to right, and so on until the passage is done or the bottom right corner of the frame is reached.

The boustrophedonic way again goes from top to bottom, with the first line running from left to right, the next from right to left, the next from left to right, and so on, with the lines’ directions alternating.

The word “boustrophedon” is from the Greek words describing the turning, at the end of each row, of an ox plowing (or “harrowing”) a field.

The Tale of
the Eternal Blazon

by Washington Irving

Blazon meant originally a shield, and then the heraldic bearings on a shield.
Later it was applied to the art of describing or depicting heraldic bearings
in the proper manner; and finally the term came to signify ostentatious display
and also description or record by words or other means. In Hamlet, Act I. Sc. 5,
the Ghost, while talking with Prince Hamlet, says:

‘But this eternal blazon
must not be
To ears of flesh and blood.’

Eternal blazon signifies revelation or description of things pertaining to eternity.”

Irving’s Sketch Book, p. 461

By Washington Irving and Mary Elizabeth Litchfield, Ginn & Company, 1901

Related material:

Folding (and harrowing up)
some eternal blazons —

The 16 Puzzle: transformations of a 4x4 square
These are the foldings
described above.

They are two of the 322,560
natural ways to fit
the list (or tale)
“1, 2, 3, … 15, 16”
into a 4×4 frame.

For further details, see
The Diamond 16 Puzzle.

Moral of the tale:

Cynthia Zarin in The New Yorker, issue dated April 12, 2004–

Time, for L’Engle, is accordion-pleated. She elaborated, ‘When you bring a sheet off the line, you can’t handle it until it’s folded, and in a sense, I think, the universe can’t exist until it’s folded– or it’s a story without a book.'”

Thursday, November 6, 2008

Thursday November 6, 2008

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 10:07 AM

Death of a Classmate

Michael Crichton,
Harvard College, 1964

Authors Michael Crichton and David Foster Wallace in NY Times obituaries, Thursday, Nov.  6, 2008

Authors Michael Crichton and
David Foster Wallace in today’s
New York Times obituaries

The Times’s remarks above
on the prose styles of
Crichton and Wallace–
“compelling formula” vs.
“intricate complexity”–
suggest the following works
of visual art in memory
of Crichton.

“Crystal”

Crystal from 'Diamond Theory'

“Dragon”

(from Crichton’s
Jurassic Park)–

Dragon Curve from 'Jurassic Park'

For the mathematics
(dyadic harmonic analysis)
relating these two figures,
see Crystal and Dragon.

Some philosophical
remarks related to
the Harvard background
that Crichton and I share–

Hitler’s Still Point

and
The Crimson Passion.

Monday, December 11, 2006

Monday December 11, 2006

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 7:20 AM
Geometry and Death

J. G. Ballard on “the architecture of death“:

“… a huge system of German fortifications that included the Siegfried line, submarine pens and huge flak towers that threatened the surrounding land like lines of Teutonic knights. Almost all had survived the war and seemed to be waiting for the next one, left behind by a race of warrior scientists obsessed with geometry and death.”

The Guardian, March 20, 2006

Edward Hirsch on Lorca:

“For him, writing is a struggle both with geometry and death.”

— “The Duende,” American Poetry Review, July/August 1999

“Rosenblum writes with
absolute intellectual honesty,
and the effect is sheer liberation….
The disposition of the material is
a model of logic and clarity.”

Harper’s Magazine review
quoted on back cover of
Cubism and Twentieth-Century Art,
by Robert Rosenblum
(Abrams paperback, 2001)

SINGER, ISAAC:
“Are Children the Ultimate Literary Critics?”
 — Top of the News 29 (Nov. 1972): 32-36.
“Sets forth his own aims in writing for children
 and laments ‘slice of life’ and chaos in
children’s literature. Maintains that children
like good plots, logic, and clarity,
and that they have a concern for
‘so-called eternal questions.'”

An Annotated Listing of Criticism
by Linnea Hendrickson

“She returned the smile, then looked
across the room to her youngest brother,
Charles Wallace, and to their father,
who were deep in concentration, bent
over the model they were building
of a tesseract: the square squared,
and squared again: a construction
of the dimension of time.”

A Swiftly Tilting Planet,
by Madeleine L’Engle

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06B/061211-Swiftly2.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

For “the dimension of time,”
see A Fold in Time,
Time Fold, and
Diamond Theory in 1937

A Swiftly Tilting Planet is a fantasy for children set partly in Vespugia, a fictional country bordered by Chile and Argentina.

For a more adult audience —

In memory of General Augusto Pinochet, who died yesterday in Santiago, Chile, a quotation from Federico Garcia Lorca‘s lecture on “the Duende” (Buenos Aires, Argentina, 1933):

“… Philip of Austria… longing to discover the Muse and the Angel in theology, found himself imprisoned by the Duende of cold ardors in that masterwork of the Escorial, where geometry abuts with a dream and the Duende wears the mask of the Muse for the eternal chastisement of the great king.”


Perhaps. Or perhaps Philip, “the lonely
hermit of the Escorial,” is less lonely now.

Thursday, July 27, 2006

Thursday July 27, 2006

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:29 PM
Real Numbers:


720,
513
 
(NY Lottery today)

“Was there really a cherubim
waiting at the star-watching rock…?
Was he real?
What is real?”

— Madeleine L’Engle,
A Wind in the Door,
quoted at math16.com

7/20:
Real

5/13:
A Fold in Time

 

Wednesday, July 5, 2006

Wednesday July 5, 2006

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 12:25 PM

And now, from
the author of Sphere

CUBE

He beomes aware of something else… some other presence.
“Anybody here?” he says.
I am here.
He almost jumps, it is so loud. Or it seems loud. Then he wonders if he has heard anything at all.
“Did you speak?”
No.
How are we communicating? he wonders.
The way everything communicates with everything else.
Which way is that?
Why do you ask if you already know the answer?

Sphere, by Michael Crichton, Harvard ’64

“… when I went to Princeton things were completely different. This chapel, for instance– I remember when it was just a clearing, cordoned off with sharp sticks.  Prayer was compulsory back then, and you couldn’t just fake it by moving your lips; you had to know the words, and really mean them.  I’m dating myself, but this was before Jesus Christ.”

Baccalaureate address at Princeton, Pentecost 2006, reprinted in The New Yorker, edited by David Remnick, Princeton ’81

Related figures:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06A/060617-Spellbound.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

For further details,
see Solomon’s Cube
and myspace.com/affine.

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06A/060705-Cube.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

For further details,
see Jews on Buddhism
and
Adventures in Group Theory.

“In this way we are offered
a formidable lesson
for every Christian community.”

Pope Benedict XVI
on Pentecost,
June 4, 2006,
St. Peter’s Square
.

Saturday, May 13, 2006

Saturday May 13, 2006

Filed under: General — m759 @ 4:00 PM

ART WARS continued…

A Fold in Time

From May 13, Braque’s birthday, 2003:


Braque


Above: Braque and tesseract

“The senses deform, the mind forms.  Work to perfect the mind.  There is no certitude but in what the mind conceives.”

— Georges Braque, Reflections on Painting, 1917

Those who wish to follow Braque’s advice may try the following exercise from a book first published in 1937:

The image “http://www.log24.com/theory/images/Carmichael440ex.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Hint: See the above picture of
Braque and the construction of
a tesseract.

Related material:

Storyline and Time Fold
(both of Oct. 10, 2003),
and the following–

Time, for L’Engle, is accordion-pleated. She elaborated, ‘When you bring a sheet off the line, you can’t handle it until it’s folded, and in a sense, I think, the universe can’t exist until it’s folded– or it’s a story without a book.'”

Cynthia Zarin on Madeleine L’Engle,
“The Storyteller,” in The New Yorker,
issue dated April 12, 2004

Monday, October 31, 2005

Monday October 31, 2005

Filed under: General — Tags: , , , — m759 @ 2:00 AM

Balance

The image “http://log24.com/log/pix03/030109-gridsmall.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

“An asymmetrical balance is sought since it possesses more movement. This is achieved by the imaginary plotting of the character upon a nine-fold square, invented by some ingenious writer of the Tang dynasty. If the square were divided in half or in four, the result would be symmetrical, but the nine-fold square permits balanced asymmetry.”– Chiang Yee, Chinese Calligraphy,
quoted in Aspen no. 10, item 8“‘Burnt Norton’ opens as a meditation on time. Many comparable and contrasting views are introduced. The lines are drenched with reminiscences of Heraclitus’ fragments on flux and movement….  the chief contrast around which Eliot constructs this poem is that between the view of time as a mere continuum, and the difficult paradoxical Christian view of how man lives both ‘in and out of time,’ how he is immersed in the flux and yet can penetrate to the eternal by apprehending timeless existence within time and above it. But even for the Christian the moments of release from the pressures of the flux are rare, though they alone redeem the sad wastage of otherwise unillumined existence. Eliot recalls one such moment of peculiar poignance, a childhood moment in the rose-garden– a symbol he has previously used, in many variants, for the birth of desire. Its implications are intricate and even ambiguous, since they raise the whole problem of how to discriminate between supernatural vision and mere illusion. Other variations here on the theme of how time is conquered are more directly apprehensible. In dwelling on the extension of time into movement, Eliot takes up an image he had used in ‘Triumphal March’: ‘at the still point of the turning world.’ This notion of ‘a mathematically pure point’ (as Philip Wheelwright has called it) seems to be Eliot’s poetic equivalent in our cosmology for Dante’s ‘unmoved Mover,’ another way of symbolising a timeless release from the ‘outer compulsions’ of the world. Still another variation is the passage on the Chinese jar in the final section. Here Eliot, in a conception comparable to Wallace Stevens’ ‘Anecdote of the Jar,’ has suggested how art conquers time:

       Only by the form, the pattern,
Can words or music reach
The stillness, as a Chinese jar still
Moves perpetually in its stillness.”

— F. O. Matthiessen,
The Achievement of T.S. Eliot,
Oxford University Press, 1958,
as quoted in On “Burnt Norton”

Tuesday, September 28, 2004

Tuesday September 28, 2004

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 3:33 PM

3:33:33 PM

Romantic Interaction, continued…

The Rhyme of Time

From American Dante Bibliography for 1983:

Freccero, John. "Paradiso X: The Dance of the Stars" (1968). Reprinted in Dante in America … (q.v.), pp. 345-371. [1983]

Freccero, John. "The Significance of terza rima." In Dante, Petrarch, Boccaccio: Studies in the Italian Trecento … (q.v.), pp. 3-17. [1983]

Interprets the meaning of terza rima in terms of a temporal pattern of past, present, and future, with which the formal structure and the thematics of the whole poem coordinate homologically: "both the verse pattern and the theme proceed by a forward motion which is at the same time recapitulary." Following the same pattern in the three conceptual orders of the formal, thematical, and logical, the autobiographical narrative too is seen "as forward motion that moves towards its own beginning, or as a form of advance and recovery, leading toward a final recapitulation." And the same pattern is found especially to obtain theologically and biblically (i.e., historically). By way of recapitulation, the author concludes with a passage from Augustine's Confessions on the nature of time, which "conforms exactly to the movement of terza rima." Comes with six diagrams illustrating the various patterns elaborated in the text.

From Rachel Jacoff's review of Pinsky's translation of Dante's Inferno:

"John Freccero's Introduction to the translation distills a compelling reading of the Inferno into a few powerful and immediately intelligible pages that make it clear why Freccero is not only a great Dante scholar, but a legendary teacher of the poem as well."

From The Undivine Comedy, Ch. 2, by Teodolinda Barolini (Princeton University Press, 1992):

"… we exist in time which, according to Aristotle, "is a kind of middle-point, uniting in itself both a beginning and an end, a beginning of future time and an end of past time."* It is further to say that we exist in history, a middleness that, according to Kermode, men try to mitigate by making "fictive concords with origins and ends, such as give meaning to lives and to poems." Time and history are the media Dante invokes to begin a text whose narrative journey will strive to imitate– not escape– the journey it undertakes to represent, "il cammin di nostra vita."

* Aristotle is actually referring to the moment, which he considers indistinguishable from time: "Now since time cannot exist and is unthinkable apart from the moment, and the moment is a kind of middle-point, uniting as it does in itself both a beginning and an end, a beginning of future time and an end of past time, it follows that there must always be time: for the extremity of the last period of time that we take must be found in some moment, since time contains no point of contact for us except in the moment. Therefore, since the moment is both a beginning and an end there must always be time on both sides of it" (Physics 8.1.251b18-26; in the translation of R. P. Hardie and R. K. Gaye, in The Basic Works of Aristotle, ed. Richard McKeon [New York: Random House, 1941]).  

From Four Quartets:

And the pool was filled with water out of sunlight,
And the lotos rose, quietly, quietly,
The surface glittered out of heart of light,
And they were behind us, reflected in the pool.
Then a cloud passed, and the pool was empty.
Go, said the bird, for the leaves were full of children,
Hidden excitedly, containing laughter.
Go, go, go, said the bird: human kind
Cannot bear very much reality.
Time past and time future
What might have been and what has been
Point to one end, which is always present.

Sunday, November 2, 2003

Sunday November 2, 2003

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 11:11 AM

All Souls' Day
at the Still Point

From remarks on Denis Donoghue's Speaking of Beauty in the New York Review of Books, issue dated Nov. 20, 2003, page 48:

"The Russian theorist Bakhtin lends his august authority to what Donoghue's lively conversation has been saying, or implying, all along.  'Beauty does not know itself; it cannot found and validate itself — it simply is.' "

From The Bakhtin Circle:

"Goethe's imagination was fundamentally chronotopic, he visualised time in space:

Time and space merge … into an inseparable unity … a definite and absolutely concrete locality serves at the starting point for the creative imagination… this is a piece of human history, historical time condensed into space….

Dostoevskii… sought to present the voices of his era in a 'pure simultaneity' unrivalled since Dante. In contradistinction to that of Goethe this chronotope was one of visualising relations in terms of space not time and this leads to a philosophical bent that is distinctly messianic:

Only such things as can conceivably be linked at a single point in time are essential and are incorporated into Dostoevskii's world; such things can be carried over into eternity, for in eternity, according to Dostoevskii, all is simultaneous, everything coexists…. "

Bakhtin's notion of a "chronotope" was rather poorly defined.  For a geometric structure that might well be called by this name, see Poetry's Bones and Time Fold.  For a similar, but somewhat simpler, structure, see Balanchine's Birthday.

From Four Quartets:

"At the still point, there the dance is."

From an essay by William H. Gass on Malcolm Lowry's classic novel Under the Volcano:

"There is no o'clock in a cantina."
 

Friday, October 10, 2003

Friday October 10, 2003

Filed under: General — m759 @ 4:44 PM

Storyline

To hear a story, or to read it straight through from start to finish, is to travel along a one-dimensional line.  A well-structured story has, however, more than one dimension.

Juxtaposing scenes shows that details that seem to be far apart in the telling (or the living) of a story may in fact be closely related.

Here is an example from the film “Contact,” in which a young girl’s drawing and a vision of paradise are no longer separated by the time it takes to tell (or live) the story:

(See my entry of Michaelmas 2002.)

For details of how time is “folded
by artists and poets, see the following:

A Wrinkle in Time, by Madeleine L’Engle,

and Time Fold, by S. H. Cullinane.

Monday, March 10, 2003

Monday March 10, 2003

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 5:45 AM

ART WARS:

Art at the Vanishing Point

Two readings from The New York Times Book Review of Sunday,

March 9,

2003 are relevant to our recurring "art wars" theme.  The essay on Dante by Judith Shulevitz on page 31 recalls his "point at which all times are present."  (See my March 7 entry.)  On page 12 there is a review of a novel about the alleged "high culture" of the New York art world.  The novel is centered on Leo Hertzberg, a fictional Columbia University art historian.  From Janet Burroway's review of What I Loved, by Siri Hustvedt:

"…the 'zeros' who inhabit the book… dramatize its speculations about the self…. the spectator who is 'the true vanishing point, the pinprick in the canvas.'''

Here is a canvas by Richard McGuire for April Fools' Day 1995, illustrating such a spectator.

For more on the "vanishing point," or "point at infinity," see

"Midsummer Eve's Dream."

Connoisseurs of ArtSpeak may appreciate Burroway's summary of Hustvedt's prose: "…her real canvas is philosophical, and here she explores the nature of identity in a structure of crystalline complexity."

For another "structure of crystalline
complexity," see my March 6 entry,

"Geometry for Jews."

For a more honest account of the
New York art scene, see Tom Wolfe's
 
The Painted Word.
 

Friday, March 7, 2003

Friday March 7, 2003

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 4:00 AM

Lovely, Dark and Deep

On this date in 1923, "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening," by Robert Frost, was published.  On this date in 1999, director Stanley Kubrick died.  On this date in 1872, Piet Mondrian was born.

"….mirando il punto
a cui tutti li tempi son presenti"

— Dante, Paradiso, XVII, 17-18 

Chez Mondrian
Kertész, Paris, 1926 

6:23 PM Friday, March 7:

From Measure Theory, by Paul R. Halmos, Van Nostrand, 1950:

"The symbol is used throughout the entire book in place of such phrases as 'Q.E.D.' or 'This completes the proof of the theorem' to signal the end of a proof."
 

Thursday, November 21, 2002

Thursday November 21, 2002

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:23 PM

Pray

This brief heading echoes the title of the latest novel by Michael Crichton, perhaps the best-known member of the Harvard College class of 1964. In honor of that class and of Q (see the preceding entry), here is a condensed excerpt from a passage of Plato quoted by Q:

Socrates. ‘Should we not, before going, offer up a prayer to these local deities?’

‘By all means,’ Phaedrus agrees.

Socrates (praying): ‘Beloved Pan, and all ye other gods who haunt this place, grant me beauty in the inward soul, and that the outward and inward may be at one!….

That prayer, I think, is enough for me.’

Phaedrus. ‘Ask the same for me, Socrates. Friends, methinks, should have all things in common.’

Socrates. ‘So be it…. Let us go.’

In accordance with this prayer, and with the coming of summer to Australia, that land beloved of Pan, this site’s music now returns to the theme introduced in my note of September 10, 2002, “The Sound of Hanging Rock.”

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