Log24

Monday, May 6, 2019

One Stuff

Filed under: General — Tags: , , , — m759 @ 1:17 PM

Building blocks?

From a post of May 4

Structure of the eightfold cube

See also Espacement  and The Thing and I.

Saturday, May 4, 2019

Inside the White Cube

Filed under: General — Tags: , , , , — m759 @ 8:48 PM

Structure of the eightfold cube

See also Espacement  and The Thing and I.

Friday, May 3, 2019

“As a Chinese jar” — T. S. Eliot

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 1:06 PM

 

Wednesday, April 24, 2019

Critical Visibility

Filed under: General — Tags: , , , , — m759 @ 8:24 AM

Correction — "Death has 'the whole spirit sparkling…'"
should be "Peace after death has 'the whole spirit sparkling….'" 
The page number, 373, is a reference to Wallace Stevens:
Collected Poetry and Prose
, Library of America, 1997.

See also the previous post, "Critical Invisibility."

Tuesday, April 23, 2019

Critical Invisibility

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , , , — m759 @ 11:00 PM

From Gotay and Isenberg, "The Symplectization of Science,"
Gazette des Mathématiciens  54, 59-79 (1992):

" what is the origin of the unusual name 'symplectic'? ….
Its mathematical usage is due to Hermann Weyl who,
in an effort to avoid a certain semantic confusion, renamed
the then obscure 'line complex group' the 'symplectic group.'
… the adjective 'symplectic' means 'plaited together' or 'woven.'
This is wonderfully apt…."

On "The Emperor's New Clothes" —

Andersen’s weavers, as one commentator points out, are merely insisting that “the value of their labor be recognized apart from its material embodiment.” The invisible cloth they weave may never manifest itself in material terms, but the description of its beauty (“as light as spiderwebs” and “exquisite”) turns it into one of the many wondrous objects found in Andersen’s fairy tales. It is that cloth that captivates us, making us do the imaginative work of seeing something beautiful even when it has no material reality. Deeply resonant with meaning and of rare aesthetic beauty—even if they never become real—the cloth and other wondrous objets d’art have attained a certain degree of critical invisibility.

—  Maria Tatar, The Annotated Hans Christian Andersen  (W. W. Norton & Company, 2007). Kindle Edition. 

A Certain Dramatic Artfulness

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , , , — m759 @ 11:43 AM

See also a book found in a Log24 search for Tillich

Thursday, March 21, 2019

Geometry of Interstices

Filed under: General — Tags: , , , — m759 @ 10:18 PM

Finite Galois geometry with the underlying field the simplest one possible —
namely, the two-element field GF(2) — is a geometry of  interstices :

For some less precise remarks, see the tags Interstice and Interality.

The rationalist motto "sincerity, order, logic and clarity" was quoted
by Charles Jencks in the previous post.

This  post was suggested by some remarks from Queensland that
seem to exemplify these qualities —

Monday, March 11, 2019

Ant-Man Meets Doctor Strange

Filed under: General — m759 @ 1:22 PM

IMAGE- Concepts of Space

The 4×4 square may also be called the Galois Tesseract .
By analogy, the 4x4x4 cube may be called the Galois Hexeract .

"Think outside the tesseract.

Saturday, March 9, 2019

Weapons of Mass Distraction

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:46 PM

"Back to the Future" and . . .

I prefer another presentation from the above 
Universal Pictures date — June 28, 2018 —

 

Space Man from Plato

 

Friday, March 8, 2019

Photo Opportunity

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:30 PM

"I need a photo opportunity . . . ." — Paul Simon

A Logo for Sheinberg

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Thursday, February 28, 2019

Previn’s Wake

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 1:19 PM

A search for Previn in this  journal yields . . . 

"whyse Salmonson set his seel on a hexengown,"
Finnegans Wake Book II, Episode 2, pp. 296-297

Fooling

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:12 AM

Galois (i.e., finite) fields described as 'deep modern algebra'

IMAGE- History of Mathematics in a Nutshell

The two books pictured above are From Discrete to Continuous ,
by Katherine Neal, and Geometrical Landscapes , by Amir Alexander.

Note: There is no Galois (i.e., finite) field with six elements, but
the theory  of finite fields underlies applications of six-set geometry.

Sunday, February 10, 2019

Cold Open

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:25 PM

The previous post, on the Bauhaus 100th anniversary, suggests a review . . .

"Congratulations to the leaders of both parties:
The past 20 years you’ve taken us far.
We’re entering Weimar, baby."

Peggy Noonan in The Wall Street Journal
 
   on August 13, 2015
 

Image from yesterday's Log24 search Bauhaus Space.

Monday, January 21, 2019

Fall, 1939

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 8:48 AM

She'll always have Paris.

Meditation for the Champ de Mors

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 AM

"his onesidemissing for an allblind alley
leading to an Irish plot in the Champ de Mors"
— James Joyce, Finnegans Wake

Sunday, January 20, 2019

Scope Resolution

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:00 AM

Wikipedia on a programming term

The scope resolution operator helps to identify
and specify the context to which an identifier refers,
particularly by specifying a namespace. The specific
uses vary across different programming languages
with the notions of scoping.  In many languages
the scope resolution operator is written

 "::".

In a completely different context, these four dots might represent
a geometric object  — the four-point plane .

Saturday, January 19, 2019

Spinning the Wake

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:32 PM

Friday, January 18, 2019

Location, Location, Location

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:01 PM

See also, from a post of November 1, 2018

The Woke Grids …

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 10:45 AM

… as opposed to The Dreaming Jewels .

A July 2014 Amsterdam master's thesis on the Golay code
and Mathieu group —

"The properties of G24 and M24 are visualized by
four geometric objects:  the icosahedron, dodecahedron,
dodecadodecahedron, and the cubicuboctahedron."

Some "geometric objects"  — rectangular, square, and cubic arrays —
are even more fundamental than the above polyhedra.

A related image from a post of Dec. 1, 2018

Thursday, January 10, 2019

Toy Story Continues.

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:13 AM

Takeuchi, Miami 2018- Spekkens's Toy Model and Vector Spaces over Galois Fields

See also Spekkens in this  journal.

Tuesday, December 18, 2018

Shadowhunter Tales

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:59 PM

The recent post "Tales from Story Space," about the 18th birthday
of the protagonist in the TV series "Shadowhunters" (2016-),
suggests a review of the actual  18th birthday of actress Lily Collins.

Collins is shown below warding off evil with a magical rune as
a shadowhunter in the 2013 film "City of Bones" —

She turned 18 on March 18, 2007.  A paper on symmetry and logic
referenced here on that date displays the following "runes" of 
philosopher Charles Sanders Peirce

See also Adamantine Meditation  (Log24, Oct. 3, 2018)
and the webpage Geometry of the I Ching.

Sunday, December 16, 2018

Interlocking

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 2:30 PM

http://m759.net/wordpress/?s=Eddington+Song

'The Eddington Song'

Sunday, December 2, 2018

Symmetry at Hiroshima

Filed under: G-Notes,General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 6:43 AM

A search this morning for articles mentioning the Miracle Octad Generator
of R. T. Curtis within the last year yielded an abstract for two talks given
at Hiroshima on March 8 and 9, 2018

http://www.math.sci.hiroshima-u.ac.jp/
branched/files/2018/abstract/Aitchison.txt

Iain AITCHISON

Title:

Construction of highly symmetric Riemann surfaces, related manifolds, and some exceptional objects, I, II

Abstract:

Since antiquity, some mathematical objects have played a special role, underpinning new mathematics as understanding deepened. Perhaps archetypal are the Platonic polyhedra, subsequently related to Platonic idealism, and the contentious notion of existence of mathematical reality independent of human consciousness.

Exceptional or unique objects are often associated with symmetry – manifest or hidden. In topology and geometry, we have natural base points for the moduli spaces of closed genus 2 and 3 surfaces (arising from the 2-fold branched cover of the sphere over the 6 vertices of the octahedron, and Klein's quartic curve, respectively), and Bring's genus 4 curve arises in Klein's description of the solution of polynomial equations of degree greater than 4, as well as in the construction of the Horrocks-Mumford bundle. Poincare's homology 3-sphere, and Kummer's surface in real dimension 4 also play special roles.

In other areas: we have the exceptional Lie algebras such as E8; the sporadic finite simple groups; the division algebras: Golay's binary and ternary codes; the Steiner triple systems S(5,6,12) and S(5,8,24); the Leech lattice; the outer automorphisms of the symmetric group S6; the triality map in dimension 8; and so on. We also note such as: the 27 lines on a cubic, the 28 bitangents of a quartic curve, the 120 tritangents of a sextic curve, and so on, related to Galois' exceptional finite groups PSL2(p) (for p= 5,7,11), and various other so-called `Arnol'd Trinities'.

Motivated originally by the `Eightfold Way' sculpture at MSRI in Berkeley, we discuss inter-relationships between a selection of these objects, illustrating connections arising via highly symmetric Riemann surface patterns. These are constructed starting with a labeled polygon and an involution on its label set.

Necessarily, in two lectures, we will neither delve deeply into, nor describe in full, contexts within which exceptional objects arise. We will, however, give sufficient definition and detail to illustrate essential inter-connectedness of those exceptional objects considered.

Our starting point will be simplistic, arising from ancient Greek ideas underlying atomism, and Plato's concepts of space. There will be some overlap with a previous talk on this material, but we will illustrate with some different examples, and from a different philosophical perspective.

Some new results arising from this work will also be given, such as an alternative graphic-illustrated MOG (Miracle Octad Generator) for the Steiner system S(5,8,24), and an alternative to Singerman – Jones' genus 70 Riemann surface previously proposed as a completion of an Arnol'd Trinity. Our alternative candidate also completes a Trinity whose two other elements are Thurston's highly symmetric 6- and 8-component links, the latter related by Thurston to Klein's quartic curve.

See also yesterday morning's post, "Character."

Update: For a followup, see the next  Log24 post.

Tuesday, November 20, 2018

Logos

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 12:21 PM

(Continued)

Musical accompaniment from Sunday morning

'The Eddington Song'

Update of Nov. 21 —

The reader may contrast the above Squarespace.com logo
(a rather serpentine version of the acronym SS) with a simpler logo
for a square space (the Galois window ):

Tuesday, November 6, 2018

Bait and Tackle

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 1:13 PM

The Bait —

For the tackle, see a 1988 album from The Residents.

Monday, November 5, 2018

High Life at Sils Maria

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:00 AM

Related art —

Sunday, November 4, 2018

“Look Up” — The Breakthrough Prize* Theme This Evening

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:45 PM

Looking up images for "The Space Theory of Truth" this evening —

Detail  (from the post "Logos" of Oct. 14)

http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=53323

Saturday, November 3, 2018

For St. Anselm

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 11:00 PM

"… at his home in San Anselmo . . . ."

See also Anselm in this journal, as well as the Devil's Night post Ojos.

Tuesday, October 30, 2018

Ojos

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 11:11 PM

From the Hulu series 'The Path,' the Eye logo

A better term than "phase space" might be "story space."

Friday, September 14, 2018

Denkraum

Filed under: G-Notes,General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 1:00 AM

http://www.log24.com/log/pix18/180914-Warburg_Denkraum-Google-result.jpg

I Ching Geometry search result

Underlying the I Ching  structure  is the finite affine space
of six dimensions over the Galois field with two elements.

In this field,  "1 + 1 = 0,"  as noted here Wednesday.

See also other posts now tagged  Interstice.

http://www.log24.com/log/pix18/180914-Warburg-Wikipedia.jpg

Sunday, September 9, 2018

Plan 9 Continues.

Filed under: G-Notes,General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 9:00 AM

"The role of Desargues's theorem was not understood until
the Desargues configuration was discovered. For example,
the fundamental role of Desargues's theorem in the coordinatization
of synthetic projective geometry can only be understood in the light
of the Desargues configuration.

Thus, even as simple a formal statement as Desargues's theorem
is not quite what it purports to be. The statement of Desargues's theorem
pretends to be definitive, but in reality it is only the tip of an iceberg
of connections with other facts of mathematics."

— From p. 192 of "The Phenomenology of Mathematical Proof,"
by Gian-Carlo Rota, in Synthese , Vol. 111, No. 2, Proof and Progress
in Mathematics
(May, 1997), pp. 183-196. Published by: Springer.

Stable URL: https://www.jstor.org/stable/20117627.

Related figures —

Note the 3×3 subsquare containing the triangles ABC, etc.

"That in which space itself is contained" — Wallace Stevens

Friday, July 6, 2018

Something

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:48 AM

"… Only by the form, the pattern,
Can words or music reach
The stillness, as a Chinese jar still
Moves perpetually in its stillness."

— T. S. Eliot, "Burnt Norton," 1936

"Read something that means something."

Advertising slogan for The New Yorker

The previous post quoted some mystic meditations of Octavio Paz
from 1974. I prefer some less mystic remarks of Eddington from
1938 (the Tanner Lectures) published by Cambridge U. Press in 1939 —

"… we have sixteen elements with which to form a group-structure" —

See as well posts tagged Dirac and Geometry.

Wednesday, June 27, 2018

Taken In

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:36 AM

A passage that may or may not have influenced Madeleine L'Engle's
writings about the tesseract :

From Mere Christianity , by C. S. Lewis (1952) —

"Book IV – Beyond Personality:
or First Steps in the Doctrine of the Trinity"
. . . .

I warned you that Theology is practical. The whole purpose for which we exist is to be thus taken into the life of God. Wrong ideas about what that life is, will make it harder. And now, for a few minutes, I must ask you to follow rather carefully.

You know that in space you can move in three ways—to left or right, backwards or forwards, up or down. Every direction is either one of these three or a compromise between them. They are called the three Dimensions. Now notice this. If you are using only one dimension, you could draw only a straight line. If you are using two, you could draw a figure: say, a square. And a square is made up of four straight lines. Now a step further. If you have three dimensions, you can then build what we call a solid body, say, a cube—a thing like a dice or a lump of sugar. And a cube is made up of six squares.

Do you see the point? A world of one dimension would be a straight line. In a two-dimensional world, you still get straight lines, but many lines make one figure. In a three-dimensional world, you still get figures but many figures make one solid body. In other words, as you advance to more real and more complicated levels, you do not leave behind you the things you found on the simpler levels: you still have them, but combined in new ways—in ways you could not imagine if you knew only the simpler levels.

Now the Christian account of God involves just the same principle. The human level is a simple and rather empty level. On the human level one person is one being, and any two persons are two separate beings—just as, in two dimensions (say on a flat sheet of paper) one square is one figure, and any two squares are two separate figures. On the Divine level you still find personalities; but up there you find them combined in new ways which we, who do not live on that level, cannot imagine.

In God's dimension, so to speak, you find a being who is three Persons while remaining one Being, just as a cube is six squares while remaining one cube. Of course we cannot fully conceive a Being like that: just as, if we were so made that we perceived only two dimensions in space we could never properly imagine a cube. But we can get a sort of faint notion of it. And when we do, we are then, for the first time in our lives, getting some positive idea, however faint, of something super-personal—something more than a person. It is something we could never have guessed, and yet, once we have been told, one almost feels one ought to have been able to guess it because it fits in so well with all the things we know already.

You may ask, "If we cannot imagine a three-personal Being, what is the good of talking about Him?" Well, there isn't any good talking about Him. The thing that matters is being actually drawn into that three-personal life, and that may begin any time —tonight, if you like.

. . . .

But beware of being drawn into the personal life of the Happy Family .

https://www.jstor.org/stable/24966339

"The colorful story of this undertaking begins with a bang."

And ends with

Martin Gardner on Galois

"Galois was a thoroughly obnoxious nerd,
 suffering from what today would be called
 a 'personality disorder.'  His anger was
 paranoid and unremitting."

Friday, May 4, 2018

The Tuchman Radical*

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 3:33 PM

Two excerpts from today's Art & Design section of
The New York Times  —

For the deplorables of France —

For further remarks on l'ordre ,
see posts tagged Galois's Space
( tag=galoiss-space).

* The radical of the title is Évariste Galois (1811-1832).

Tuesday, May 1, 2018

Wake

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 2:29 PM

Remarks on space from 1998 by sci-fi author Robert J. Sawyer quoted
here on Sunday (see the tag "Sawyer's Space") suggest a review of
rather similar remarks on space from 1977 by sci-fi author M. A. Foster
(see the tag "Foster's Space"):

Quoted here on September 26, 2012

"All she had to do was kick off and flow."

— The Gameplayers of Zan

"I'se so silly to be flowing but I no canna stay."

— Finnegans Wake

Another work by Sawyer —

Sunday, April 29, 2018

Amusement

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 7:00 PM

From the online New York Times  this afternoon:

Disney now holds nine of the top 10
domestic openings of all time —
six of which are part of the Marvel
Cinematic Universe. “The result is
a reflection of 10 years of work:
of developing this universe, creating
stakes as big as they were, characters
that matter and stories and worlds that
people have come to love,” Dave Hollis,
Disney’s president of distribution, said
in a phone interview.

From this  journal this morning:

"But she felt there must be more to this
than just the sensation of folding space
over on itself. Surely the Centaurs hadn't
spent ten years telling humanity how to 
make a fancy amusement-park ride
.
There had to be more—"

Factoring Humanity , by Robert J. Sawyer,
Tom Doherty Associates, 2004 Orb edition,
page 168

"The sensation of folding space . . . ."

Or unfolding:

Click the above unfolded space for some background.

Sermon

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:00 AM

'Imprisoned in a tesseract' in a 1998 science fiction novel

Thursday, April 19, 2018

Something to Behold

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 2:45 PM

From a review of a Joyce Carol Oates novel
at firstthings.com on August 23, 2013 —

"Though the Curse is eventually exorcised,
it is through an act of wit and guile,
not an act of repentance or reconciliation.
And so we may wonder if Oates has put this story
to rest, or if it simply lays dormant. A twenty-first
century eruption of the 'Crosswicks Curse
would be something to behold." [Link added.]

Related material —

A film version of A Wrinkle in Time

The Hamilton watch from "Interstellar" (2014) —

See also a post, Vacant Space, from 8/23/13 (the date
of the above review), and posts tagged Space Writer.

Monday, March 12, 2018

“Quantum Tesseract Theorem?”

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , — m759 @ 11:00 AM

Remarks related to a recent film and a not-so-recent film.

For some historical background, see Dirac and Geometry in this journal.

Also (as Thas mentions) after Saniga and Planat —

The Saniga-Planat paper was submitted on December 21, 2006.

Excerpts from this  journal on that date —

A Halmos tombstone and the tale of HAL and the pod bay doors

     "Open the pod bay doors, HAL."

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

Excited

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 5:48 PM

"How do you  get young people excited about space?"

— Megan Garber in The Atlantic , Aug. 16, 2012

The above quote is from this  journal  on 9/11, 2014.

Related material —

Synchronology for the above date — 9/11, 2014 —

A BuzzFeed article with that date, and in reply

"A Personal Statement from Michael Shermer" with that date.

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

A Girl’s Guide to Chaos

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:55 AM

The title is that of a play mentioned last night in
a New York Times  obituary .

Related recent film lines —

  • Thor:  How do I escape?
  • Heimdall:  You're on a planet surrounded by doorways.
    Go through one.
  • Thor:  Which one?
  • Heimdall:  The big one!

Related material from this  journal on Jan. 20, 2018 —

The Chaos Symbol of Dan Brown.

Mathematics and Narrative

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 9:00 AM

(Continued)

Excerpts from a post of May 25, 2005 —

Above is an example I like of mathematics….

Here is an example I like of narrative:

Kate felt quite dizzy. She didn't know exactly what it was
that had just happened, but she felt pretty damn  certain  that
it  was  the  sort of experience that her mother would not have
approved of on a first date.
     "Is this all part of what we have to do to go to  Asgard?"
she said. "Or are you just fooling around?"
     "We will go to Asgard...now," he said.
     At that moment he raised his hand as if to pluck an apple,
but instead of plucking he made a tiny, sharp turning movement.
The effect  was as if he had twisted the entire world through a
billionth part of a billionth  part  of  a  degree.  Everything
shifted,  was  for  a  moment  minutely  out of focus, and then
snapped back again as a suddenly different world.

— Douglas Adams, The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul

Image from a different  different world —

Hat-tip to a related Feb. 26 weblog post
at the American Mathematical Society.

Friday, February 16, 2018

Two Kinds of Symmetry

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 11:29 PM

The Institute for Advanced Study (IAS) at Princeton in its Fall 2015 Letter 
revived "Beautiful Mathematics" as a title:

This ugly phrase was earlier used by Truman State University
professor Martin Erickson as a book title. See below. 

In the same IAS Fall 2015 Letter appear the following remarks
by Freeman Dyson —

". . . a special case of a much deeper connection that Ian Macdonald 
discovered between two kinds of symmetry which we call modular and affine.
The two kinds of symmetry were originally found in separate parts of science,
modular in pure mathematics and affine in physics. Modular symmetry is
displayed for everyone to see in the drawings of flying angels and devils
by the artist Maurits Escher. Escher understood the mathematics and got the
details right. Affine symmetry is displayed in the peculiar groupings of particles
created by physicists with high-energy accelerators. The mathematician
Robert Langlands was the first to conjecture a connection between these and
other kinds of symmetry. . . ." (Wikipedia link added.)

The adjective "modular"  might aptly be applied to . . .

The adjective "affine"  might aptly be applied to . . .

From 'Beautiful Mathematics,' by Martin Erickson, an excerpt on the Cullinane diamond theorem (with source not mentioned)

The geometry of the 4×4 square combines modular symmetry
(i.e., related to theta functions) with the affine symmetry above.

Hudson's 1905 discussion of modular symmetry (that of Rosenhain
tetrads and Göpel tetrads) in the 4×4 square used a parametrization
of that square by the digit 0 and the fifteen 2-subsets of a 6-set, but 
did not discuss the 4×4 square as an affine space.

For the connection of the 15 Kummer modular 2-subsets with the 16-
element affine space over the two-element Galois field GF(2), see my note
of May 26, 1986, "The 2-subsets of a 6-set are the points of a PG(3,2)" —

— and the affine structure in the 1979 AMS abstract
"Symmetry invariance in a diamond ring" —

For some historical background on the symmetry investigations by
Dyson and Macdonald, see Dyson's 1972 article "MIssed Opportunities."

For Macdonald's own  use of the words "modular" and "affine," see
Macdonald, I. G., "Affine Lie algebras and modular forms," 
Séminaire N. Bourbaki , Vol. 23 (1980-1981), Talk no. 577, pp. 258-276.

Thursday, January 25, 2018

Beware of Analogical Extension

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 11:29 AM

"By an archetype  I mean a systematic repertoire
of ideas by means of which a given thinker describes,
by analogical extension , some domain to which
those ideas do not immediately and literally apply."

— Max Black in Models and Metaphors 
    (Cornell, 1962, p. 241)

"Others … spoke of 'ultimate frames of reference' …."
Ibid.

A "frame of reference" for the concept  four quartets

A less reputable analogical extension  of the same
frame of reference

Madeleine L'Engle in A Swiftly Tilting Planet :

"… deep in concentration, bent over the model
they were building of a tesseract:
the square squared, and squared again…."

See also the phrase Galois tesseract .

Thursday, November 23, 2017

Lévi-Strauss vs. Propp

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:25 PM
 

​Claude Lévi-Strauss

From his "Structure and Form:
Reflections on a Work by Vladimir Propp
" *

To maintain. as I have done. that the permutability of contents is not arbitrary amounts to saying that, if the analysis is carried to a sufficiently deep level, behind diversity we will discover constancy. And, of course. the avowed constancy of form must not hide from us that functions are also permutable.

The structure of the folktale as it is illustrated by Propp presents a chronological succession of qualitatively distinct functions. each constituting an independent genre. One can wonder whether—as with dramatis personae and their attributes— Propp does not stop too soon, seeking the form too close to the level of empirical observation. Among the thirty-one functions that he distinguishes, several are reducible to the same  function reappearing at different  moments of the narrative but after undergoing one or a number of transformations . I have already suggested that this could be true of the false hero (a transformation of the villain), of assigning a difficult task (a transformation of the test), etc. (see p. 181 above), and that in this case the two parties  constituting the fundamental tale would themselves be transformations of each other.

Nothing prevents pushing this reduction even further and analyzing each separate partie  into a small number of recurrent functions, so that several of Propp's functions would constitute groups of transformations of one and the same function. We could treat the "violation" as the reverse of the "prohibition" and the latter as a negative transformation of the "injunction." The "departure" of the hero and his "return" would appear as the negative and positive expressions of the same disjunctive function. The "quest" of the hero (hero pursues someone or something) would become the opposite of "pursuit" (hero is pursued by something or someone), etc.

In Vol. I of Structural Anthropology , p. 209, I have shown that this analysis alone can account for the double aspect of time representation in all mythical systems: the narrative is both "in time" (it consists of a succession of events) and "beyond" (its value is permanent). With regard to Propp's theories my analysis offers another advantage: I can reconcile much better than Propp himself  his principle of a permanent order of wondertale elements with the fact that certain functions or groups of functions are shifted from one tale to the next (pp. 97-98. p. 108) If my view is accepted, the chronological succession will come to be absorbed into an atemporal matrix structure whose form is indeed constant. The shifting of functions is then no more than a mode of permutation (by vertical columns or fractions of columns).

These critical remarks are certainly valid for the method used by Propp and for his conclusions. However. it cannot be stressed enough that Propp envisioned them and in several places formulated with perfect clarity the solutions I have just suggested. Let us take up again from this viewpoint the two essential themes of our discussion: constancy of the content (in spite of its permutability) and permutability of functions (in spite of their constancy).

* Translated from a 1960 work in French.  It appeared in English as Chapter VIII
of Structural Anthropology, Volume 2  (U. of Chicago Press, 1976).  Chapter VIII
was originally published in Cahiers de l'Institut de Science 
Économique Appliquée , 
No. 9 (Series M, No. 7) (Paris: ISEA, March 1960).

See also "Lévi-Strauss" + Formula  in this journal.

Some background related to the previous post

Wednesday, October 25, 2017

To the Egress

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:24 PM

The New York Times  at 8:22 PM ET

"Knight Landesman, a longtime publisher of Artforum magazine
and a power broker in the art world, resigned on Wednesday
afternoon, hours after a lawsuit was filed in New York accusing
him of sexually harassing at least nine women in episodes that
stretched back almost a decade."

See as well, in this  journal, Way to the Egress.

The Palo Alto Edge

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 1:00 PM

From Stanford — The death on October 9, 2017, of a man who
"always wanted to be at the most cutting of cutting-edge technology."

Related material from Log24 on April 26, 2017

A sketch, adapted from Girl Scouts of Palo Alto —

Click the sketch for further details.

Saturday, September 23, 2017

The Turn of the Frame

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , — m759 @ 2:19 AM

"With respect to the story's content, the frame thus acts
both as an inclusion of the exterior and as an exclusion
of the interior: it is a perturbation of the outside at the
very core of the story's inside, and as such, it is a blurring
of the very difference between inside and outside."

— Shoshana Felman on a Henry James story, p. 123 in
"Turning the Screw of Interpretation,"
Yale French Studies  No. 55/56 (1977), pp. 94-207.
Published by Yale University Press.

See also the previous post and The Galois Tesseract.

Tuesday, September 5, 2017

Annals of Critical Epistemology

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 5:36 PM

"But unlike many who left the Communist Party, I turned left
rather than right, and returned—or rather turned for the first time—
to a critical examination of Marx's work. I found—and still find—
that his analysis of capitalism, which for me is the heart of his work,
provides the best starting point, the best critical tools, with which—
suitably developed—to understand contemporary capitalism.
I remind you that this year is also the sesquicentennial of the
Communist Manifesto , a document that still haunts the capitalist world."

— From "Autobiographical Reflections," a talk given on June 5, 1998, by
John Stachel at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin
on the occasion of a workshop honoring his 70th birthday, 
"Space-Time, Quantum Entanglement and Critical Epistemology."

From a passage by Stachel quoted in the previous post

From the source for Stachel's remarks on Weyl and coordinatization —

Note that Stachel distorted Weyl's text by replacing Weyl's word 
"symbols" with the word "quantities." —

This replacement makes no sense if the coordinates in question
are drawn from a Galois field — a field not of quantities , but rather
of algebraic symbols .

"You've got to pick up every stitch… Must be the season of the witch."
— Donovan song at the end of Nicole Kidman's "To Die For"

Florence 2001

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 4:44 AM

Or:  Coordinatization for Physicists

This post was suggested by the link on the word "coordinatized"
in the previous post.

I regret that Weyl's term "coordinatization" perhaps has
too many syllables for the readers of recreational mathematics —
for example, of an article on 4×4 magic squares by Conway, Norton,
and Ryba to be published today by Princeton University Press.

Insight into the deeper properties of such squares unfortunately
requires both the ability to learn what a "Galois field" is and the
ability to comprehend seven-syllable words.

Sunday, August 27, 2017

Black Well

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 PM

The "Black" of the title refers to the previous post.
For the "Well," see Hexagram 48.

Related material —

The Galois Tesseract and, more generally, Binary Coordinate Systems.

Friday, August 11, 2017

Symmetry’s Lifeboat

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , — m759 @ 9:16 PM

A post suggested by the word tzimtzum  (see Wednesday)
or tsimtsum  (see this morning) —

Lifeboat from the Tsimtsum  in Life of Pi  —

Another sort of tsimtsum, contracting infinite space to a finite space

IMAGE- Desargues's theorem in light of Galois geometry

Tuesday, July 11, 2017

A Date at the Death Cafe

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 8:48 PM

The New York TImes  reports this evening that
"Jon Underwood, Founder of Death Cafe Movement,"
died suddenly at 44 on June 27. 

This  journal on that date linked to a post titled "The Mystic Hexastigm."

A related remark on the complete 6-point   from Sunday, April 28, 2013

(See, in Veblen and Young's 1910 Vol. I, exercise 11,
page 53: "A plane section of a 6-point in space can  
be considered as 3 triangles perspective in pairs
from 3 collinear points with corresponding sides
meeting in 3 collinear points." This is the large  
Desargues configuration. See Classical Geometry
in Light of Galois Geometry
.)

This  post was suggested, in part, by the philosophical ruminations
of Rosalind Krauss in her 2011 book Under Blue Cup . See 
Sunday's post  Perspective and Its Transections . (Any resemblance
to Freud's title Civilization and Its Discontents  is purely coincidental.)

Sunday, July 9, 2017

Perspective and Its Transections

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 5:27 PM

The title phrase is from Rosalind Krauss (Under Blue Cup , 2011) —

Another way of looking at the title phrase —

"A very important configuration is obtained by
taking the plane section of a complete space five-point." 
(Veblen and Young, 1910, p. 39) —

'Desargues via Galois' in Japan (via Pinterest) 

For some context, see Desargues + Galois in this journal.

Wednesday, July 5, 2017

Imaginarium of a Different Kind

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 9:00 PM

The title refers to that of the previous post, "The Imaginarium."

In memory of a translator who reportedly died on May  22, 2017,
a passage quoted here on that date —

Related material — A paragraph added on March 15, 2017,
to the Wikipedia article on Galois geometry

George Conwell gave an early demonstration of Galois geometry in 1910 when he characterized a solution of Kirkman's schoolgirl problem as a partition of sets of skew lines in PG(3,2), the three-dimensional projective geometry over the Galois field GF(2).[3] Similar to methods of line geometry in space over a field of characteristic 0, Conwell used Plücker coordinates in PG(5,2) and identified the points representing lines in PG(3,2) as those on the Klein quadric.

— User Rgdboer

Friday, June 16, 2017

Chalkroom Jungle

Filed under: General — Tags: , , , — m759 @ 3:33 AM

At MASS MoCA, the installation "Chalkroom" quotes a lyric —

Oh beauty in all its forms
funny how hatred can also be a beautiful thing
When it's as sharp as a knife
as hard as a diamond

Perfect

— From "One Beautiful Evening," by Laurie Anderson.

See also the previous post and "Smallest Perfect" in this journal.

Thursday, June 15, 2017

Building Six

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 7:47 PM

Berkshire tales of May 25, 2017 —

See also, in this  journal from May 25 and earlier, posts now tagged
"The Story of Six."

Saturday, June 3, 2017

Expanding the Spielraum (Continued*)

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 1:13 PM

Or:  The Square

"What we do may be small, but it has
 a certain character of permanence."
— G. H. Hardy

* See Expanding the Spielraum in this journal.

Monday, May 29, 2017

The American Sublime

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 12:12 PM

Line from "Vide," a post of June 8, 2014 —

Vide  Classical Geometry in Light of Galois Geometry.

Recall that vide  means different things in Latin and in French.

See also Stevens + "Vacant Space" in this journal.

Tuesday, May 23, 2017

Pursued by a Biplane

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 9:41 PM

The Galois Tesseract as a biplane —

Cary Grant in 'North by Northwest'

Saturday, May 20, 2017

The Ludicrous Extreme

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 1:04 AM

From a review of the 2016 film "Arrival"

"A seemingly off-hand reference to Abbott and Costello
is our gateway. In a movie as generally humorless as Arrival,
the jokes mean something. Ironically, it is Donnelly, not Banks,
who initiates the joke, naming the verbally inexpressive
Heptapod aliens after the loquacious Classical Hollywood
comedians. The squid-like aliens communicate via those beautiful,
cryptic images. Those signs, when thoroughly comprehended,
open the perceiver to a nonlinear conception of time; this is
Sapir-Whorf taken to the ludicrous extreme."

Jordan Brower in the Los Angeles Review of Books

Further on in the review —

"Banks doesn’t fully understand the alien language, but she
knows it well enough to get by. This realization emerges
most evidently when Banks enters the alien ship and, floating
alongside Costello, converses with it in their picture-language.
She asks where Abbott is, and it responds — as presented
in subtitling — that Abbott 'is death process.'
'Death process' — dying — is not idiomatic English, and what
we see, written for us, is not a perfect translation but a
rendering of Banks’s understanding. This, it seems to me, is a
crucial moment marking the hard limit of a human mind,
working within the confines of human language to understand
an ultimately intractable xenolinguistic system."

For what may seem like an intractable xenolinguistic system to
those whose experience of mathematics is limited to portrayals
by Hollywood, see the previous post —

van Lint and Wilson Meet the Galois Tesseract.

The death process of van Lint occurred on Sept. 28, 2004.

See this journal on that date

Thursday, April 27, 2017

Partner, Anchor, Decompose

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 12:31 PM

See also a figure from 2 AM ET April 26 

" Partner, anchor, decompose. That's not math.
That's the plot to 'Silence of the Lambs.' "

Greg Gutfeld, September 2014

Wednesday, April 26, 2017

A Tale Unfolded

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , — m759 @ 2:00 AM

A sketch, adapted tonight from Girl Scouts of Palo Alto

From the April 14 noon post High Concept

From the April 14 3 AM post Hudson and Finite Geometry

IMAGE- Geometry of the Six-Set, Steven H. Cullinane, April 23, 2013

From the April 24 evening post The Trials of Device

Pentagon with pentagram    

Note that Hudson's 1905 "unfolding" of even and odd puts even on top of
the square array, but my own 2013 unfolding above puts even at its left.

Monday, April 24, 2017

The Trials of Device

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , — m759 @ 3:28 PM

"A blank underlies the trials of device"
— Wallace Stevens, "An Ordinary Evening in New Haven" (1950)

A possible meaning for the phrase "the trials of device" —

See also Log24 posts mentioning a particular device, the pentagram .

For instance —

Wittgenstein's pentagram and 4x4 'counting-pattern'

Related figures

Pentagon with pentagram    

Monday, April 17, 2017

Hatched

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:00 AM

Related art —

See also the previous post.

Saturday, April 15, 2017

Quanta Dating

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 3:15 PM

From Quanta Magazine  —

For the Church of Synchronology

See also this  journal on July 17, 2014, and March 28, 2017.

Friday, April 14, 2017

Hudson and Finite Geometry

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 3:00 AM

IMAGE- Geometry of the Six-Set, Steven H. Cullinane, April 23, 2013

The above four-element sets of black subsquares of a 4×4 square array 
are 15 of the 60 Göpel tetrads , and 20 of the 80 Rosenhain tetrads , defined
by R. W. H. T. Hudson in his 1905 classic Kummer's Quartic Surface .

Hudson did not  view these 35 tetrads as planes through the origin in a finite
affine 4-space (or, equivalently, as lines in the corresponding finite projective
3-space).

In order to view them in this way, one can view the tetrads as derived,
via the 15 two-element subsets of a six-element set, from the 16 elements
of the binary Galois affine space pictured above at top left.

This space is formed by taking symmetric-difference (Galois binary)
sums of the 15 two-element subsets, and identifying any resulting four-
element (or, summing three disjoint two-element subsets, six-element)
subsets with their complements.  This process was described in my note
"The 2-subsets of a 6-set are the points of a PG(3,2)" of May 26, 1986.

The space was later described in the following —

IMAGE- Dolgachev and Keum, coordinatization of the 4x4 array in 'Birational Automorphisms of Quartic Hessian Surfaces,' AMS Transactions, 2002

Wednesday, April 12, 2017

Contracting the Spielraum

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , , — m759 @ 10:00 AM

The contraction of the title is from group actions on
the ninefold square  (with the center subsquare fixed)
to group actions on the eightfold cube.

From a post of June 4, 2014

At math.stackexchange.com on March 1-12, 2013:

Is there a geometric realization of the Quaternion group?” —

The above illustration, though neatly drawn, appeared under the
cloak of anonymity.  No source was given for the illustrated group actions.
Possibly they stem from my Log24 posts or notes such as the Jan. 4, 2012,
note on quaternion actions at finitegeometry.org/sc (hence ultimately
from my note “GL(2,3) actions on a cube” of April 5, 1985).

Expanding the Spielraum

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:48 AM

Cézanne's Greetings.

"Cézanne ignores the laws of classical perspective . . . ."

— Voorhies, James. “Paul Cézanne (1839–1906).”
In Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History .  New York:
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2000–. (October 2004)

Some others do not.

This is what I called "the large Desargues configuration
in posts of April 2013 and later.

Tuesday, April 4, 2017

White Cube

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:21 PM

"Inside the White Cube" —

"We have now reached
a point where we see
not the art but the space first….
An image comes to mind
of a white, ideal space
that, more than any single picture,
may be the archetypal image
of 20th-century art."

http://www.log24.com/log/pix09/090205-cube2x2x2.gif

"Space: what you
damn well have to see."

— James Joyce, Ulysses  

Monday, April 3, 2017

Even Core

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:16 PM

4x4x4 gray cube

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11A/110625-CubeHypostases.gif

Odd Core

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:00 PM

 

3x3x3 Galois cube, gray and white

Wednesday, March 29, 2017

The Crimson Abyss

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 3:19 PM

"And as the characters in the meme twitch into the abyss
that is the sky, this meme will disappear into whatever
internet abyss swallowed MySpace."

—Staff writer Kamila Czachorowski, Harvard Crimson , March 29

1984

IMAGE- 'Affine Groups on Small Binary Spaces,' illustration

2010

Logo design for Stack Exchange Math by Jin Yang
 

Recent posts now tagged Crimson Abyss suggest
the above logo be viewed in light of a certain page 29

"… as if into a crimson abyss …." —

Update of 9 PM ET March 29, 2017:

Prospero's Children  was first published by HarperCollins,
London, in 1999. A statement by the publisher provides
an instance of the famous "much-needed gap." —

"This is English fantasy at its finest. Prospero’s Children 
steps into the gap that exists between The Lion, the Witch
and the Wardrobe
  and Clive Barker’s Weaveworld , and
is destined to become a modern classic."

Related imagery —

See also "Hexagram 64 in Context" (Log24, March 16, 2017).

Design Abyss

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 1:00 PM


http://www.log24.com/images/IChing/hexagram29.gif  
Hexagram 29,
The Abyss (Water)

This post was suggested by an August 6, 2010, post by the designer
(in summer or fall, 2010) of the Stack Exchange math logo (see
the previous Log24 post, Art Space Illustrated) —

http://www.8164.org/☵☲/  .

In that post, the designer quotes the Wilhelm/Baynes I Ching  to explain
his choice of Hexagram 63, Water Over Fire, as a personal icon —

"When water in a kettle hangs over fire, the two elements
stand in relation and thus generate energy (cf. the
production of steam). But the resulting tension demands
caution. If the water boils over, the fire is extinguished
and its energy is lost. If the heat is too great, the water
evaporates into the air. These elements here brought in
to relation and thus generating energy are by nature
hostile to each other. Only the most extreme caution
can prevent damage."

See also this  journal on Walpurgisnacht (April 30), 2010 —

http://www.log24.com/images/IChing/hexagram29.gif

Hexagram 29:
Water

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10A/100430-Commentary.jpg

http://www.log24.com/images/IChing/hexagram30.gif

Hexagram 30:
Fire

"Hates California,
it's cold and it's damp.
"

Image--'The Fire,' by Katherine Neville

A thought from another German-speaking philosopher

"Die Philosophie ist ein Kampf gegen die Verhexung
unsres Verstandes durch die Mittel unserer Sprache."

See also The Crimson 's abyss in today's 4:35 AM post Art Space, Continued.

Tuesday, March 28, 2017

Bit by Bit

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , — m759 @ 11:45 AM

From Log24, "Cube Bricks 1984" —

An Approach to Symmetric Generation of the Simple Group of Order 168

Also on March 9, 2017 —

For those who prefer graphic  art —

Broken Symmetries  in  Diamond Space  

Backstory

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:06 AM

Click here to enlarge.  Click the image for the source page.

The "this page" reference is to …

Finite Geometry of the Square and Cube.

Also from March 14, 2017 —

Related material

'Children of the Central Structure,' adapted from 'Children of the Damned'

Thursday, March 2, 2017

Ageometretos*

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 1:40 PM

Or:  "A Hologram for the King" Meets "Big"

* A reference to an alleged motto of Plato's Academy

Stories

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 12:48 PM

"We tell ourselves stories in order to live." — Joan Didion

The New York Times Magazine  online today —

"As a former believer and now a nonbeliever, Carrère,
seeking answers, sets out, in The Kingdom , to tell
the story of the storytellers. He is trying to understand
what it takes to be able to tell a story, any story.
And what he finds, once again, is that you have to find
your role in it."

Wyatt Mason in The New York Times Magazine ,
     online March 2, 2017 

Like Tom Hanks?

Robert Langdon (played by Tom Hanks) and a corner of Solomon's Cube

Click image for related posts.

Sunday, January 29, 2017

Lottery Hermeneutics

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 1:00 PM

For some backstory, see Lottery in this journal,
esp. a post of June 28, 2007:

Real Numbers: An Object Lesson.

One such number, 8775, is suggested by 
a Heinlein short story in a Jan. 25 post.

A search today for that number —

That Jan. 25 post, "For Your Consideration," also mentions logic.

Logic appears as well within a post from the above "8775" date,
August 16, 2016 —

Update of 10 am on August 16, 2016 —

See also Atiyah on the theology of 
(Boolean) algebra vs. (Galois) geometry:

Related:  Remarks by Charles Altieri on Wittgenstein in
today's previous post.

For remarks by  Wittgenstein related to geometry and logic, see 
(for instance) "Logical space" in "A Wittgenstein Dictionary," by
Hans-Johann Glock (Wiley-Blackwell, 1996).

Saturday, December 31, 2016

Habeas

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 7:00 PM

Approaches to geometry: axioms vs. constructions

Breach's 1981 approach is not axiomatic,
but instead graphic. Another such approach —

Wednesday, October 5, 2016

Sources

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:00 AM

From a Google image search yesterday

Sources (left to right, top to bottom) —

Math Guy (July 16, 2014)
The Galois Tesseract (Sept. 1, 2011)
The Full Force of Roman Law (April 21, 2014)
A Great Moonshine (Sept. 25, 2015)
A Point of Identity (August 8, 2016)
Pascal via Curtis (April 6, 2013)
Correspondences (August 6, 2011)
Symmetric Generation (Sept. 21, 2011)

Monday, September 26, 2016

The Embedding

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:45 AM

From this morning's 3:33 AM ET post

Adapted from a post of Dec. 8, 2012, "Defining the Contest" —

      From a post of Sept. 22,
  "Binary Opposition Illustrated" —

From Sunday's news

Palmervision

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 3:33 AM

Eleanor Arroway and Palmer Joss in the "Occam's Razor"
scene from the 1997 film "Contact"

Sunday, September 25, 2016

Introduction to Pragmatism

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 7:29 AM

Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy
on the origins of Pragmatism:

"Pragmatism had been born in the discussions at
a ‘metaphysical club’ in Harvard around 1870
(see Menand…*). Peirce and James participated
in these discussions along with some other philosophers
and philosophically inclined lawyers. As we have
already noted, Peirce developed these ideas in his
publications from the 1870s."

From "How to Make Our Ideas Clear,"
by Charles Sanders Peirce in 1878 —

"The very first lesson that we have a right to demand that logic shall teach us is, how to make our ideas clear; and a most important one it is, depreciated only by minds who stand in need of it. To know what we think, to be masters of our own meaning, will make a solid foundation for great and weighty thought. It is most easily learned by those whose ideas are meagre and restricted; and far happier they than such as wallow helplessly in a rich mud of conceptions. A nation, it is true, may, in the course of generations, overcome the disadvantage of an excessive wealth of language and its natural concomitant, a vast, unfathomable deep of ideas. We may see it in history, slowly perfecting its literary forms, sloughing at length its metaphysics, and, by virtue of the untirable patience which is often a compensation, attaining great excellence in every branch of mental acquirement. The page of history is not yet unrolled which is to tell us whether such a people will or will not in the long-run prevail over one whose ideas (like the words of their language) are few, but which possesses a wonderful mastery over those which it has. For an individual, however, there can be no question that a few clear ideas are worth more than many confused ones. A young man would hardly be persuaded to sacrifice the greater part of his thoughts to save the rest; and the muddled head is the least apt to see the necessity of such a sacrifice. Him we can usually only commiserate, as a person with a congenital defect. Time will help him, but intellectual maturity with regard to clearness comes rather late, an unfortunate arrangement of Nature, inasmuch as clearness is of less use to a man settled in life, whose errors have in great measure had their effect, than it would be to one whose path lies before him. It is terrible to see how a single unclear idea, a single formula without meaning, lurking in a young man's head, will sometimes act like an obstruction of inert matter in an artery, hindering the nutrition of the brain, and condemning its victim to pine away in the fullness of his intellectual vigor and in the midst of intellectual plenty. Many a man has cherished for years as his hobby some vague shadow of an idea, too meaningless to be positively false; he has, nevertheless, passionately loved it, has made it his companion by day and by night, and has given to it his strength and his life, leaving all other occupations for its sake, and in short has lived with it and for it, until it has become, as it were, flesh of his flesh and bone of his bone; and then he has waked up some bright morning to find it gone, clean vanished away like the beautiful Melusina of the fable, and the essence of his life gone with it. I have myself known such a man; and who can tell how many histories of circle-squarers, metaphysicians, astrologers, and what not, may not be told in the old German story?"

Peirce himself may or may not have been entirely successful
in making his ideas clear.  See Where Credit Is Due  (Log24, 
June 11, 2016) and the Wikipedia article Categories (Peirce).

* Menand, L., 2001. The Metaphysical Club A Story of
Ideas in America
 
, New York:  Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Saturday, September 24, 2016

The Seven Seals

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 7:23 AM

From Hermann Weyl's 1952 classic Symmetry —

"Galois' ideas, which for several decades remained
a book with seven seals  but later exerted a more
and more profound influence upon the whole
development of mathematics, are contained in
a farewell letter written to a friend on the eve of
his death, which he met in a silly duel at the age of
twenty-one. This letter, if judged by the novelty and
profundity of ideas it contains, is perhaps the most
substantial piece of writing in the whole literature
of mankind."

Some Galois geometry —

See the previous post for more narrative.

Core Structure

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 6:40 AM

For the director of "Interstellar" and "Inception"

At the core of the 4x4x4 cube is …

 


                                                      Cover modified.

The Eightfold Cube

Thursday, September 15, 2016

The Smallest Perfect Number/Universe

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , — m759 @ 6:29 AM

The smallest perfect number,* six, meets
"the smallest perfect universe,"** PG(3,2).

IMAGE- Geometry of the Six-Set, Steven H. Cullinane, April 23, 2013

  * For the definition of "perfect number," see any introductory
    number-theory text that deals with the history of the subject.
** The phrase "smallest perfect universe" as a name for PG(3,2),
     the projective 3-space over the 2-element Galois field GF(2),
     was coined by math writer Burkard Polster. Cullinane's square
     model of PG(3,2) differs from the earlier tetrahedral model
     discussed by Polster.

Tuesday, September 13, 2016

Parametrizing the 4×4 Array

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , , — m759 @ 10:00 PM

The previous post discussed the parametrization of 
the 4×4 array as a vector 4-space over the 2-element 
Galois field GF(2).

The 4×4 array may also be parametrized by the symbol
0  along with the fifteen 2-subsets of a 6-set, as in Hudson's
1905 classic Kummer's Quartic Surface

Hudson in 1905:

These two ways of parametrizing the 4×4 array — as a finite space
and as an array of 2-element sets —  were related to one another
by Cullinane in 1986 in describing, in connection with the Curtis
"Miracle Octad Generator,"  what turned out to be 15 of Hudson's
1905 "Göpel tetrads":

A recap by Cullinane in 2013:

IMAGE- Geometry of the Six-Set, Steven H. Cullinane, April 23, 2013

Click images for further details.

Wednesday, August 24, 2016

Core Statements

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 1:06 PM

"That in which space itself is contained" — Wallace Stevens

An image by Steven H. Cullinane from April 1, 2013:

The large Desargues configuration of Euclidean 3-space can be 
mapped canonically to the 4×4 square of Galois geometry —

'Desargues via Rosenhain'- April 1, 2013- The large Desargues configuration mapped canonically to the 4x4 square

On an Auckland University of Technology thesis by Kate Cullinane —
On Kate Cullinane's book 'Sample Copy' - 'The core statement of this work...'
The thesis reportedly won an Art Directors Club award on April 5, 2013.

Monday, August 1, 2016

Cube

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 10:28 PM

From this journal —

See (for instance) Sacred Order, July 18, 2006 —

The finite Galois affine space with 64 points

From a novel published July 26, 2016, and reviewed
in yesterday's (print) New York Times Book Review —

The doors open slowly. I step into a hangar. From the rafters high above, lights blaze down, illuminating a twelve-foot cube the color of gunmetal. My pulse rate kicks up. I can’t believe what I’m looking at. Leighton must sense my awe, because he says, “Beautiful, isn’t it?” It is exquisitely beautiful. At first, I think the hum inside the hangar is coming from the lights, but it can’t be. It’s so deep I can feel it at the base of my spine, like the ultralow-frequency vibration of a massive engine. I drift toward the box, mesmerized.

— Crouch, Blake. Dark Matter: A Novel
(Kindle Locations 2004-2010).
Crown/Archetype. Kindle Edition. 

See also Log24 on the publication date of Dark Matter .

Thursday, July 28, 2016

The Giglmayr Foldings

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 1:44 PM

Giglmayr's transformations (a), (c), and (e) convert
his starting pattern

  1    2   5   6
  3    4   7   8
  9  10 13 14
11  12 15 16

to three length-16 sequences. Putting these resulting
sequences back into the 4×4 array in normal reading
order, we have

  1    2    3    4        1   2   4   3          1    4   2   3
  5    6    7    8        5   6   8   7          7    6   8   5 
  9  10  11  12      13 14 16 15       15 14 16 13
13  14  15  16       9  10 12 11        9  12 10 11

         (a)                         (c)                      (e)

Four length-16 basis vectors for a Galois 4-space consisting
of the origin and 15 weight-8 vectors over GF(2):

0 0 0 0       0 0 0 0       0 0 1 1       0 1 0 1
0 0 0 0       1 1 1 1       0 0 1 1       0 1 0 1 
1 1 1 1       0 0 0 0       0 0 1 1       0 1 0 1
1 1 1 1       1 1 1 1       0 0 1 1       0 1 0 1 .

(See "Finite Relativity" at finitegeometry.org/sc.)

The actions of Giglmayr's transformations on the above
four basis vectors indicate the transformations are part of
the affine group (of order 322,560) on the affine space
corresponding to the above vector space.

For a description of such transformations as "foldings,"
see a search for Zarin + Folded in this journal.

Monday, May 30, 2016

Perfect Universe

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 7:00 PM

(A sequel to the previous post, Perfect Number)

Since antiquity,  six has been known as
"the smallest perfect number." The word "perfect"
here means that a number is the sum of its 
proper divisors — in the case of six: 1, 2, and 3.

The properties of a six-element set (a "6-set") 
divided into three 2-sets and divided into two 3-sets
are those of what Burkard Polster, using the same 
adjective in a different sense, has called 
"the smallest perfect universe" — PG(3,2), the projective
3-dimensional space over the 2-element Galois field.

A Google search for the phrase "smallest perfect universe"
suggests a turnaround in meaning , if not in finance, 
that might please Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer on her birthday —

The semantic  turnaround here in the meaning  of "perfect"
is accompanied by a model  turnaround in the picture  of PG(3,2) as
Polster's tetrahedral  model is replaced by Cullinane's square  model.

Further background from the previous post —

See also Kirkman's Schoolgirl Problem.

Sunday, May 29, 2016

Sunday School

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 8:00 AM

Analogy

Tuesday, May 24, 2016

Rosenhain and Göpel Revisited

The authors Taormina and Wendland in the previous post
discussed some mathematics they apparently did not know was
related to a classic 1905 book by R. W. H. T. Hudson, Kummer's
Quartic Surface
.

"This famous book is a prototype for the possibility
of explaining and exploring a many-faceted topic of
research, without focussing on general definitions,
formal techniques, or even fancy machinery. In this
regard, the book still stands as a highly recommendable,
unparalleled introduction to Kummer surfaces, as a
permanent source of inspiration and, last but not least, 
as an everlasting symbol of mathematical culture."

— Werner Kleinert, Mathematical Reviews ,
     as quoted at Amazon.com

Some 4×4 diagrams from that book are highly relevant to the
discussion by Taormina and Wendland of the 4×4 squares within
the 1974 Miracle Octad Generator of R. T. Curtis that were later,
in 1987, described by Curtis as pictures of the vector 4-space over
the two-element Galois field GF(2).

Hudson did not think of his 4×4 diagrams as illustrating a vector space,
but he did use them to picture certain subsets of the 16 cells in each
diagram that he called Rosenhain and Göpel tetrads .

Some related work of my own (click images for related posts)—

Rosenhain tetrads as 20 of the 35 projective lines in PG(3,2)

IMAGE- Desargues's theorem in light of Galois geometry

Göpel tetrads as 15 of the 35 projective lines in PG(3,2)

Anticommuting Dirac matrices as spreads of projective lines

Related terminology describing the Göpel tetrads above

Ron Shaw on symplectic geometry and a linear complex in PG(3,2)

Tuesday, May 10, 2016

Game Theory

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:00 PM

The following passage appeared in this journal
on the night of May 23-24, 2015.

IMAGE- A fictional vision of resurrection within a tesseract

The afternoon  of May 23, 2015, was significant
for devotees of mathematics and narrative.

Monday, April 25, 2016

Seven Seals

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 11:00 PM

 An old version of the Wikipedia article "Group theory"
(pictured in the previous post) —

"More poetically "

From Hermann Weyl's 1952 classic Symmetry

"Galois' ideas, which for several decades remained
a book with seven seals  but later exerted a more
and more profound influence upon the whole
development of mathematics, are contained in
a farewell letter written to a friend on the eve of
his death, which he met in a silly duel at the age of
twenty-one. This letter, if judged by the novelty and
profundity of ideas it contains, is perhaps the most
substantial piece of writing in the whole literature
of mankind."

The seven seals from the previous post, with some context —

These models of projective points are drawn from the underlying
structure described (in the 4×4 case) as part of the proof of the
Cullinane diamond theorem .

Friday, April 8, 2016

Ogdoads by Curtis

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:25 PM

As was previously noted here, the construction of the Miracle Octad Generator
of R. T. Curtis in 1974 involved his "folding" the 1×8 octads constructed in 1967
by Turyn into 2×4 form.

This resulted in a way of picturing a well-known correspondence (Conwell, 1910)
between partitions of an 8-set and lines of the projective 3-space PG(3,2).

For some background related to the "ogdoads" of the previous post, see
A Seventh Seal (Sept. 15, 2014).

Thursday, January 21, 2016

Dividing the Indivisible

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 11:00 AM

My statement yesterday morning that the 15 points
of the finite projective space PG(3,2) are indivisible 
was wrong.  I was misled by quoting the powerful
rhetoric of Lincoln Barnett (LIFE magazine, 1949).

Points of Euclidean  space are of course indivisible
"A point is that which has no parts" (in some translations).

And the 15 points of PG(3,2) may be pictured as 15
Euclidean  points in a square array (with one point removed)
or tetrahedral array (with 11 points added).

The geometry of  PG(3,2) becomes more interesting,
however, when the 15 points are each divided  into
several parts. For one approach to such a division,
see Mere Geometry. For another approach, click on the
image below.

IMAGE- 'Nocciolo': A 'kernel' for Pascal's Hexagrammum Mysticum: The 15 2-subsets of a 6-set as points in a Galois geometry.

Wednesday, January 13, 2016

Geometry for Jews

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 7:45 AM

(Continued from previous episodes)

'Games Played by Boole and Galois'

Boole and Galois also figure in the mathematics of space
i.e. , geometry.  See Boole + Galois in this journal.

Related material, according to Jung's notion of synchronicity —

Monday, December 28, 2015

ART WARS Continues

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 9:00 PM

Combining two headlines from this morning's
New York Times  and Washington Post , we have

Deceptively Simple Geometries
on a Bold Scale

     Voilà —

Click image for details.

More generally, see
Boole vs. Galois.

Sunday, December 13, 2015

The Monster as Big as the Ritz

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 11:30 AM

"The colorful story of this undertaking begins with a bang."

— Martin Gardner on the death of Évariste Galois

Sunday, December 6, 2015

Form and Idea

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , , — m759 @ 3:24 PM

"Those early works are succinct and uncompromising
in how they give shape to the philosophical perplexities
of form and idea…."

J. J. Charlesworth, artnet news, Dec. 16, 2014

"Form" and "idea" are somewhat synonymous, 
as opposed to "form" and "substance." A reading:

IMAGE- 'American Hustle' and Art Cube

Discuss.

Tuesday, December 1, 2015

Pascal’s Finite Geometry

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 12:01 AM

See a search for "large Desargues configuration" in this journal.

The 6 Jan. 2015 preprint "Danzer's Configuration Revisited," 
by Boben, Gévay, and Pisanski, places this configuration,
which they call the Cayley-Salmon configuration , in the 
interesting context of Pascal's Hexagrammum Mysticum .

They show how the Cayley-Salmon configuration is, in a sense,
dual to something they call the Steiner-Plücker configuration .

This duality appears implicitly in my note of April 26, 1986,
"Picturing the smallest projective 3-space." The six-sets at
the bottom of that note, together with Figures 3 and 4
of Boben et. al. , indicate how this works.

The duality was, as they note, previously described in 1898.

Related material on six-set geometry from the classical literature—

Baker, H. F., "Note II: On the Hexagrammum Mysticum  of Pascal,"
in Principles of Geometry , Vol. II, Camb. U. Press, 1930, pp. 219-236  

Richmond, H. W., "The Figure Formed from Six Points in Space of Four Dimensions,"
Mathematische Annalen  (1900), Volume 53, Issue 1-2, pp 161-176

Richmond, H. W., "On the Figure of Six Points in Space of Four Dimensions," 
Quarterly Journal of Pure and Applied Mathematics , Vol. 31 (1900), pp. 125-160

Related material on six-set geometry from a more recent source —

Cullinane, Steven H., "Classical Geometry in Light of Galois Geometry," webpage

Friday, November 20, 2015

Anticommuting Dirac Matrices as Skew Lines

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 11:45 PM

(Continued from November 13)

The work of Ron Shaw in this area, ca. 1994-1995, does not
display explicitly the correspondence between anticommutativity
in the set of Dirac matrices and skewness in a line complex of
PG(3,2), the projective 3-space over the 2-element Galois field.

Here is an explicit picture —

Anticommuting Dirac matrices as spreads of projective lines

References:  

Arfken, George B., Mathematical Methods for Physicists , Third Edition,
Academic Press, 1985, pages 213-214

Cullinane, Steven H., Notes on Groups and Geometry, 1978-1986

Shaw, Ron, "Finite Geometry, Dirac Groups, and the Table of
Real Clifford Algebras," undated article at ResearchGate.net

Update of November 23:

See my post of Nov. 23 on publications by E. M. Bruins
in 1949 and 1959 on Dirac matrices and line geometry,
and on another author who gives some historical background
going back to Eddington.

Some more-recent related material from the Slovak school of
finite geometry and quantum theory —

Saniga, 'Finite Projective Spaces, Geometric Spreads of Lines and Multi-Qubits,' excerpt

The matrices underlying the Saniga paper are those of Pauli, not
those of Dirac, but these two sorts of matrices are closely related.

Monday, November 2, 2015

The Devil’s Offer

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 11:09 AM

This is a sequel to the previous post and to the Oct. 24 post
Two Views of Finite Space.  From the latter —

" 'All you need to do is give me your soul:  
give up geometry and you will have this 
marvellous machine.' (Nowadays you
can think of it as a computer!) "

George Boole in image posted on All Souls' Day 2015

Colorful Story

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 10:00 AM

"The office of color in the color line
is a very plain and subordinate one.
It simply advertises the objects of
oppression, insult, and persecution.
It is not the maddening liquor, but
the black letters on the sign
telling the world where it may be had."

— Frederick Douglass, "The Color Line,"
The North American Review , Vol. 132,
No. 295, June 1881, page 575

Or gold letters.

From a search for Seagram in this  journal —

Seagram VO ad, image posted on All Souls's Day 2015

A Seagram 'colorful tale'

"The colorful story of this undertaking begins with a bang."

— Martin Gardner on the death of Évariste Galois

Saturday, October 31, 2015

Raiders of the Lost Crucible

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 10:15 AM

Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy
on the date Friday, April 5, 2013 —

Paraconsistent Logic

"First published Tue Sep 24, 1996;
substantive revision Fri Apr 5, 2013"

This  journal on the date Friday, April 5, 2013 —

The object most closely resembling a "philosophers' stone"
that I know of is the eightfold cube .

For some related philosophical remarks that may appeal 
to a general Internet audience, see (for instance) a website
by I Ching  enthusiast Andreas Schöter that displays a labeled
eightfold cube in the form of a lattice diagram —

Related material by Schöter —

A 20-page PDF, "Boolean Algebra and the Yi Jing."
(First published in The Oracle: The Journal of Yijing Studies ,
Vol 2, No 7, Summer 1998, pp. 19–34.)

I differ with Schöter's emphasis on Boolean algebra.
The appropriate mathematics for I Ching  studies is,
I maintain, not Boolean algebra  but rather Galois geometry.

See last Saturday's post Two Views of Finite Space.
Unfortunately, that post is, unlike Schöter's work, not  
suitable for a general Internet audience.

Sunday, September 6, 2015

Elementally, My Dear Watson

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 9:45 AM

Sarah Larson in the online New Yorker  on Sept. 3, 2015,
discussed Google's new parent company, "Alphabet"—

"… Alphabet takes our most elementally wonderful
general-use word—the name of the components of
language itself*—and reassigns it, like the words
tweet, twitter, vine, facebook, friend, and so on,
into a branded realm."

Emma Watson in "The Bling Ring"

This journal, also on September 3 —

Thursday, September 3, 2015

Rings of August

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 7:20 AM

For the title, see posts from August 2007
tagged Gyges.

Related theological remarks:

Boolean  spaces (old)  vs. Galois  spaces (new)  in 
"The Quality Without a Name" . . . .

* Actually, Sarah, that would be "phonemes."

Thursday, September 3, 2015

Rings of August

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 7:20 AM

For the title, see posts from August 2007 tagged Gyges.

Related theological remarks:

Boolean  spaces (old) vs. Galois  spaces  (new) in 
"The Quality Without a Name"
(a post from August 26, 2015) and the

Related literature:  A search for Borogoves in this journal will yield
remarks on the 1943 tale underlying the above film.

Wednesday, August 26, 2015

“The Quality Without a Name”

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 8:00 AM

The title phrase, paraphrased without quotes in
the previous post, is from Christopher Alexander's book
The Timeless Way of Building  (Oxford University Press, 1979).

A quote from the publisher:

"Now, at last, there is a coherent theory
which describes in modern terms
an architecture as ancient as
human society itself."

Three paragraphs from the book (pp. xiii-xiv):

19. Within this process, every individual act
of building is a process in which space gets
differentiated. It is not a process of addition,
in which preformed parts are combined to
create a whole, but a process of unfolding,
like the evolution of an embryo, in which
the whole precedes the parts, and actualy
gives birth to then, by splitting.

20. The process of unfolding goes step by step,
one pattern at a time. Each step brings just one
pattern to life; and the intensity of the result
depends on the intensity of each one of these
individual steps.

21. From a sequence of these individual patterns,
whole buildings with the character of nature
will form themselves within your thoughts,
as easily as sentences.

Compare to, and contrast with, these illustrations of "Boolean space":

(See also similar illustrations from Berkeley and Purdue.)

Detail of the above image —

Note the "unfolding," as Christopher Alexander would have it.

These "Boolean" spaces of 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 points
are also Galois  spaces.  See the diamond theorem —

Sunday, July 19, 2015

Lying Rhyme

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 6:45 PM
 

Tom Stoppard, Jumpers —

“Heaven, how can I believe in Heaven?” 
she sings at the finale.
“Just a lying rhyme for seven!”

“To begin at the beginning: Is God?…”
[very long pause]

Leave a space.”

See as well a search for "Heaven.gif" in this journal.

For the more literate among us —

     … and the modulation from algebra to space.

Wednesday, June 17, 2015

Slow Art, Continued

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 10:01 AM

The title of the previous post, "Slow Art," is a phrase
of the late art critic Robert Hughes.

Example from mathematics:

  • Göpel tetrads as subsets of a 4×4 square in the classic
    1905 book Kummer's Quartic Surface  by R. W. H. T. Hudson.
    These subsets were constructed as helpful schematic diagrams,
    without any reference to the concept of finite  geometry they
    were later to embody.
     
  • Göpel tetrads (not named as such), again as subsets of
    a 4×4 square, that form the 15 isotropic projective lines of the
    finite projective 3-space PG(3,2) in a note on finite geometry
    from 1986 —

    Göpel tetrads in an inscape, April 1986

  • Göpel tetrads as these figures of finite  geometry in a 1990
    foreword to the reissued 1905 book of Hudson:

IMAGE- Galois geometry in Wolf Barth's 1990 foreword to Hudson's 1905 'Kummer's Quartic Surface'

Click the Barth passage to see it with its surrounding text.

Related material:

Monday, June 15, 2015

Omega Matrix

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:00 PM

See that phrase in this journal.

See also last night's post.

The Greek letter Ω is customarily used to
denote a set that is acted upon by a group.
If the group is the affine group of 322,560
transformations of the four-dimensional
affine space over the two-element Galois
field, the appropriate Ω is the 4×4 grid above.

See the Cullinane diamond theorem.

Thursday, June 11, 2015

Omega

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Omega is a Greek letter, Ω , used in mathematics to denote
a set on which a group acts. 

For instance, the affine group AGL(3,2) is a group of 1,344
actions on the eight elements of the vector 3-space over the
two-element Galois field GF(2), or, if you prefer, on the Galois
field  Ω = GF(8).

Related fiction:  The Eight , by Katherine Neville.

Related non-fiction:  A remark by Werner Heisenberg
in this journal on Saturday, June 6, 2015, the eightfold cube ,
and the illustrations below —

Mathematics

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11A/110505-WikipediaFanoPlane.jpg

The Fano plane block design

Magic

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11A/110505-DeathlyHallows.jpg

The Deathly Hallows symbol—
Two blocks short of  a design.

Tuesday, June 9, 2015

Colorful Song

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 8:40 PM

For geeks* —

Domain, Domain on the Range , "

where Domain = the Galois tesseract  and
Range = the four-element Galois field.

This post was suggested by the previous post,
by a Log24 search for Knight + Move, and by
the phrase "discouraging words" found in that search.

* A term from the 1947 film "Nightmare Alley."

Saturday, May 23, 2015

Group

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:30 PM

On the artist Hilma af Klint (1862-1944):

"She belonged to a group called 'The Five'…."

Related material — Real Life (Log24, May 20, 2015).

From that post:

IMAGE- Immersion in a fictional vision of resurrection within a tesseract

Wednesday, May 20, 2015

Real Life

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:12 AM

From Amazon.com —

From the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel  Tuesday afternoon —

A 46-year-old Jesuit priest who was a Marquette University
assistant professor of theology collapsed on campus
Tuesday morning and died, President Michael Lovell
announced to the campus community in an email.

"Rev. Lúcás (Yiu Sing Luke) Chan, S.J., died after
collapsing this morning in Marquette Hall. Just last Sunday,
Father Chan offered the invocation at the Klingler College
of Arts and Sciences graduation ceremony."

Synchronicity check

From this journal on the above publication date of
Chan's book — Sept. 20, 2012 —

IMAGE- Immersion in a fictional vision of resurrection within a tesseract

From a Log24 post on the preceding day, Sept. 19, 2012 —

The Game in the Ship cannot be approached as a job,
a vocation, a career, or a recreation. To the contrary,
it is Life and Death itself at work there. In the Inner Game,
we call the Game Dhum Welur , the Mind of God."

 — The Gameplayers of Zan

Wednesday, April 22, 2015

Purely Aesthetic

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 11:00 AM

G. H. Hardy in A Mathematician's Apology —

What ‘purely aesthetic’ qualities can we distinguish in such theorems as Euclid’s or Pythagoras’s?

I will not risk more than a few disjointed remarks. In both theorems (and in the theorems, of course, I include the proofs) there is a very high degree of unexpectedness, combined with inevitability and economy. The arguments take so odd and surprising a form; the weapons used seem so childishly simple when compared with the far-reaching results; but there is no escape from the conclusions. There are no complications of detail—one line of attack is enough in each case; and this is true too of the proofs of many much more difficult theorems, the full appreciation of which demands quite a high degree of technical proficiency. We do not want many ‘variations’ in the proof of a mathematical theorem: ‘enumeration of cases’, indeed, is one of the duller forms of mathematical argument. A mathematical proof should resemble a simple and clear-cut constellation, not a scattered cluster in the Milky Way. 

Related material:

Thursday, March 26, 2015

The Möbius Hypercube

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:31 AM

The incidences of points and planes in the
Möbius 8 configuration (8 points and 8 planes,
with 4 points on each plane and 4 planes on each point),
were described by Coxeter in a 1950 paper.* 
A table from Monday's post summarizes Coxeter's
remarks, which described the incidences in
spatial terms, with the points and planes as the vertices
and face-planes of two mutually inscribed tetrahedra —

Monday's post, "Gallucci's Möbius Configuration,"
may not be completely intelligible unless one notices
that Coxeter has drawn some of the intersections in his 
Fig. 24, a schematic representation of the point-plane
incidences, as dotless, and some as hollow dots.  The figure,
"Gallucci's version of Möbius's 84," is shown below.
The hollow dots, representing the 8 points  (as opposed
to the 8 planes ) of the configuration, are highlighted in blue.

Here a plane  (represented by a dotless intersection) contains
the four points  that are represented in the square array as lying
in the same row or same column as the plane. 

The above Möbius incidences appear also much earlier in
Coxeter's paper, in figures 6 and 5, where they are shown
as describing the structure of a hypercube. 

In figures 6 and 5, the dotless intersections representing
planes have been replaced by solid dots. The hollow dots
have again been highlighted in blue.

Figures 6 and 5 demonstrate the fact that adjacency in the set of
16 vertices of a hypercube is isomorphic to adjacency in the set
of 16 subsquares of a square 4×4 array, provided that opposite
sides of the array are identified, as in Fig. 6. The digits in 
Coxeter's labels above may be viewed as naming the positions 
of the 1's in (0,1) vectors (x4, x3, x2, x1) over the two-element
Galois field.  In that context, the 4×4 array may be called, instead
of a Möbius hypercube , a Galois tesseract .

*  "Self-Dual Configurations and Regular Graphs," 
    Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society,
    Vol. 56 (1950), pp. 413-455

The subscripts' usual 1-2-3-4 order is reversed as a reminder
    that such a vector may be viewed as labeling a binary number 
    from 0  through 15, or alternately as labeling a polynomial in
    the 16-element Galois field GF(24).  See the Log24 post
     Vector Addition in a Finite Field (Jan. 5, 2013).

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