Log24

Wednesday, January 24, 2018

The Pentagram Papers

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 12:40 PM

(Continued)

From a Log24 post of March 4, 2008 —

SINGER, ISAAC:
"Are Children the Ultimate Literary Critics?"
— Top of the News 29 (Nov. 1972): 32-36.

"Sets forth his own aims in writing for children and laments
'slice of life' and chaos in children's literature. Maintains that
children like good plots, logic, and clarity, and that they
have a concern for 'so-called eternal questions.'"

— An Annotated Listing of Criticism
by Linnea Hendrickson

"She returned the smile, then looked across the room to
her youngest brother, Charles Wallace, and to their father,
who were deep in concentration, bent over the model
they were building of a tesseract: the square squared,
and squared again: a construction of the dimension of time."

— A Swiftly Tilting Planet,
by Madeleine L'Engle

Cover of 'A Swiftly Tilting Planet' and picture of tesseract

For "the dimension of time," see A Fold in TimeTime Fold,
and Diamond Theory in 1937

A Swiftly Tilting Planet  is a fantasy for children 
set partly in Vespugia, a fictional country bordered by
Chile and Argentina.

Ibid.

The pen's point:

Wm. F. Buckley as Archimedes, moving the world with a giant pen as lever. The pen's point is applied to southern South America.
John Trever, Albuquerque Journal, 2/29/08

Note the figure on the cover of National Review  above —

A related figure from Pentagram Design

See, more generally,  Isaac Singer  in this  journal.

Saturday, September 6, 2014

Plato Thanks the Academy

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:00 PM

(Continued)

Plato at Stanford:
Lacan and the Matheme of Fantasy

“… [in] the matheme of fantasy ($ ◊ ),
the diamond-shaped “lozenge” (poinçon )
can be read as a condensation of four symbols:
one, (the logical symbol for conjunction [“and”]);
two, (the logical symbol for disjunction [“or”]);
three, > (the mathematical symbol for “greater than”); and,
four, < (the mathematical symbol for “less than”). As per
Lacan’s matheme, the subject’s desires are scripted and
orchestrated by an unconscious fundamental fantasy
in which the desiring subject ($) is positioned in relation to
its corresponding object-cause of desire ( ).”

— plato.stanford.edu, Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Plato.stanford.edu on Lacan, and Halle Berry in 'Frankie and Alice'

The Stanford author: 

The author is a professor in Albuquerque.
For other perspectives, see that city in this journal.

For the film  authors, see IMDb.

Thursday, July 3, 2014

Gates and Windows:

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:00 PM

The Los Alamos Vision

“Gates said his foundation is an advocate for the Common Core State Standards
that are part of the national curriculum and focus on mathematics and language
arts. He said learning ‘needs to be on the edge’ where it is challenging but not
too challenging, and that students receive the basics through Common Core.

‘It’s great to teach other things, but you need that foundation,’ he said.”

— T. S. Last in the Albuquerque Journal , 12:05 AM Tuesday, July 1, 2014

See also the previous post (Core Mathematics: Arrays) and, elsewhere
in this journal,

“Eight is a Gate.” — Mnemonic rhyme:

Thursday, October 21, 2010

Line

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 3:57 AM

The NY Times recently discussed "Longing for the Lines That Had Us at Hello"

and  “We land in Albuquerque at 4 a.m. That’s strictly a 9 o’clock town.”

And so…

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101021-AlbuquerqueMathSm.jpg

Click to enlarge.

"How much story do you want?" — George Balanchine

Tuesday, March 4, 2008

Tuesday March 4, 2008

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 1:00 PM
… And for a
    Swiftly Tilting
       Shadowed Planet …

Wm. F. Buckley as Archimedes, moving the world with a giant pen as lever. The pen's point is applied to southern South America.
John Trever, Albuquerque Journal, 2/29/08

The pen's point:

Log24, Dec. 11, 2006

SINGER, ISAAC:
"Are Children the
Ultimate Literary Critics?"
— Top of the News 29
(Nov. 1972): 32-36.

"Sets forth his own aims in writing for children and laments 'slice of life' and chaos in children's literature. Maintains that children like good plots, logic, and clarity, and that they have a concern for 'so-called eternal questions.'"

An Annotated Listing
of Criticism
by Linnea Hendrickson

"She returned the smile, then looked across the room to her youngest brother, Charles Wallace, and to their father, who were deep in concentration, bent over the model they were building of a tesseract: the square squared, and squared again: a construction of the dimension of time."

A Swiftly Tilting Planet,
by Madeleine L'Engle

Cover of 'A Swiftly Tilting Planet' and picture of tesseract

For "the dimension of time,"
see A Fold in Time,
Time Fold, and
Diamond Theory in 1937
 
A Swiftly Tilting Planet  is a fantasy for children set partly in Vespugia, a fictional country bordered by Chile and Argentina.

Sunday, December 14, 2003

Sunday December 14, 2003

Filed under: General — m759 @ 3:43 PM

Hell to Heaven

From Hotel Point:

On a novel, Dow Mossman‘s
The Stones of Summer

Evidence of Malcolm Lowry’s Under the Volcano. The Dow Mossman character (Dawes Williams) sitting in the Rio Grande tearing pages out of his notebooks. (We get the pages, reproduced somewhat tediously in near-agate type.) Somewhere the ex-Consul Geoffrey Firmin gets mention. Mythic drinking and death in Mexico, vaguely “Jungian.”…

“The first time he had noticed it, language, was in the fourth grade when Miss Norma Jean Thompson, his teacher, turned against the whole class and said:

‘All Americans eventually go to heaven.’

‘By sweet Jesus,’ Ronnie Crown had said that afternoon, sitting on Dunchee’s wall, waiting for Dawes Williams to come tell him about it, ‘that’s about the God Damn dumbest thing I ever heard.’

Dawes Williams had agreed immediately that the message was insipid, but he thought for years that the syntax was inspired. In fact, the first time Norma Jean Thompson had said, ALL AMERICANS EVENTUALLY GO TO HEAVEN, was also the first time Dawes Williams had ever noticed the English sentence.”

From Norma Jean Thompson:

“… the Town House Restaurant on Central and Morningside [in Albuquerque]:  ‘It’s like going backwards in time to the late 1950s; you’d think you’d meet Frank Sinatra in there.  You can drown in the big red leather booths, and if you’re lucky, they’ll take out their private family stock of brandy.  Wonderful Greek salads, steaks and potatoes for lunch or dinner.  Time stops in there, right off Route 66.’ “

From wcities.com:

On the Town House Lounge & Restaurant in Albuquerque:

“Try the three-inch Baklava and feel like you have died and gone to heaven…”

AMEN.

See, too, the film “Stone Reader
and the previous Log24 entry.

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